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Conclusion: Making a business case for human capital management (HCM) solutions can be undervalued by senior leadership who do not share the same perspective as the teams involved in the proposal. Securing their commitment through highlighting pain points and respective solutions can build momentum for digital transformation.


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Conclusion: The rise in the number of employees working remotely has transitioned security implementations in favour of zero trust architecture to replace traditional, static security perimeters. But while the extensive set of current technologies and processes in a zero trust model are designed to prioritise real-time visibility into every user’s behaviour, no solution is perfect. As such, integrating a combination of security solutions is necessary since no tool or method is enough on its own. By combining technological assets, security teams can create a cohesive strategy that provides real-time intelligence across multiple networks that enables organisations to respond more quickly to internal attacks.


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The Latest

30 November 2021: Microsoft recently announced the release of Windows 11 SE in 2022, which is designed to support K-8 students’ blended learning needs in the classroom. The operating system (OS) will only be available on low-cost devices sold exclusively to educational institutions. Windows 11 SE was developed after consulting with teachers and students for 18 months, which resulted in removing the widgets section, adding an automatic backup of files to OneDrive, and launching apps in full screen mode. The new Surface Laptop SE for students as well as upcoming devices from Acer, ASUS, Dell, Dynabook, Fujitsu, HP, JK-IP, Lenovo and Positivo will carry the OS.

Why it’s Important

With the launch of Windows 11 SE, Microsoft hopes to influence educational technology teams to shy away from Chrome OS. Microsoft claims with this product, IT admins can take advantage of the simplified backend as well as bundled Microsoft and non-MS apps such as Minecraft for Education.

IBRS recently conducted a major study of the Australian education sector to explore issues relating to the transition to remote learning during the pandemic. IBRS discovered that it is not the OS, nor the device, that is the primary challenge. Rather, it is the identity, access and administration concerns safeguarding students' privacy that were the single biggest issue.

Microsoft Windows 11 SE markets itself as a student-friendly version to compete against Google Chrome OS. In Australia and New Zealand, it is unlikely to impact the relatively low (in comparison to international market) presence of Chrome OS.

Who’s impacted

  • Educational policymakers
  • CIOs
  • Educational ICT strategy leads 
  • Principals and senior leadership of higher education institutions
  • Digital workspace teams

What’s Next?

Based on IBRS’s series of consultations with the education sector, the group recommends educational institutions decide on robust or streamlined solutions based on their learners’ needs and not on the premise of fear of missing out (FOMO). Developers must continue to collaborate with their target market, allowing students to be exposed to professional tools that provide a headwind in accelerated learning. Likewise, stakeholders must constantly assess their technological devices and platforms and how these impact the learning styles of users.

Related IBRS Advisory

  1. Dr Sweeney on the Post-COVID Lessons for Education (Video Interview)
  2. Kids, Education and The Future of Work with Dr Joseph Sweeney - Potential Psychology - 25 July 2018
  3. Higher Education Technology Future State Vision
  4. BYOD in Education: A report for Australia and New Zealand

The Latest

30 November 2021: Enterprise automation software firm UiPath collaborates with business schools to support student training on robotic process automation (RPA). This is part of their program to develop students’ skills in automation technologies, especially for business and finance majors. The strategy is aimed at growing future demand for RPA among business (as opposed to technical) staff.

Why it’s Important

Microsoft successfully transformed MS Excel into a standard spreadsheet software program in universities and enterprises, and edged out Lotus 1-2-3 and Quattro Pro in the ‘80s. Having Excel built into the curriculum of most schools at that time solidified Excel’s adoption.

In a one-on-one executive interview with IBRS, UiPath’s executive revealed that while it is a relatively young vendor, it has donated millions of dollars to business schools as part of the company’s Academic Alliance partnerships. In the ANZ region, this includes:

  • University of Melbourne
  • Deakin University
  • Tower Australian College
  • University of Tasmania
  • Swinburne University of Technology
  • University of Wollongong
  • University of Auckland
  • Auckland University of Technology

UiPath’s goal is to train students early in using personal software robots to support the automation of manual processes, build smarter assistants, and create their startup similar to how Microsoft influenced developing spreadsheet skills in the ‘80s and ‘90s. In other words, the company is developing a new type of use case in the business and finance department where the launch of a non-IT version of the RPA will mean creating a domain for business majors, and not just for the IT department.

IBRS predicts that since RPA is rapidly becoming merged within the low-code everything ecosystem, it will play a vital role in business and finance even if it will take some more time for the technology to provide insights, predict outcomes and exercise self-healing. 

Who’s impacted

  • Educational policymakers
  • CIOs
  • Educational ICT strategy leads 
  • Principals and senior leadership of higher education institutions
  • Digital workspace teams

What’s Next?

IBRS recommends CIOs prepare for RPA to become a standard business staff tool over the next three to 10 years. Its accelerated adoption in universities will expand its scope of automating rule-based digital processes and advanced cognitive automation on unstructured data sources across industries. Furthermore, organisations need to recognise the shift in management approaches and process discovery by adopting more sophisticated solutions that will leverage no-code tools and AI-driven technology to achieve their target ROI.

Related IBRS Advisory

  1. Dr Sweeney on the Post-COVID Lessons for Education (Video Interview)
  2. Higher Education Technology Future State Vision
  3. Trends for 2021-2026: No new normal and preparing for the fourth-wave of ICT

The Latest

23 November 2021: SoftIron is developing an Australian facility to manufacture it’s high-performance data processing appliance. This is the company’s second facility after its California factory and they have plans to develop another centre in Berlin in the coming years. The planned edge manufacturing facility is expected to be the first component level computer manufacturing hub in Australia for several decades.

SoftIron’s New South Wales manufacturing facility is supported by a AU$1.5 million grant from the Department of Defence. The hardware provided by SoftIron will include open-source appliances for high performance data processing.

The vendor will leverage smaller-scale, automated ‘edge manufacturing’ systems and effectively side-step global supply chain bottlenecks.  

SoftIron claims that security-minded clients, such as the Australian Government, are increasingly concerned about the risks of supply chains that include foriegn entities suspected to have inserted spyware. Governments are already applying bans on foreign providers of communications and data processing hardware that power modern data centres. SoftIron claims the ability for clients to verify every aspect of a product - from the open source code to the supply chain of components and manufacturing cycle - is critical for trust in data centre appliance.

Why it’s Important

SoftIron’s entry into Australian tech manufacturing is welcome. Australia’s technology tech manufacturing was decimated by large-scale overseas production capabilities in the mid to late 80s, despite having some extraordinary world-leading products. For example, the world’s first battery-powered laptop, the Dulmont Magnum (aka the Kookaburra) designed and manufactured in Australia in 1984. Hartley Computers developed hardware and software locally in the same decade, before concentrating on supporting imported Wang minicomputers.

The SoftIron announcement raises several important considerations:

Supply Chain Risk

Procuring hardware from an foriegn manufacturing plants (such as POS and telecommunication systems) is now being flagged as a possible point of exposure to business espionage and spying. The complexity of international supply chains combined with the opaqueness of the firmware and code running on tech products, opens up many avenues for criminal and state actors to inject malware into products sold overseas. While China is a target of US suspicions, it should be noted that Australia's allies have engaged in similar activities in the past: in particular the US and Germany with encryption technologies, and the recent use of the ANoM phone app used to ensnare criminals.  

For Australian enterprises, the lack of visibility into the supply chain should be a growing concern. The only way to address this concern is to adopt a risk assessment policy that includes verifiability of the supply chain, and the firmware and code of products.

Support Chain

Edge manufacturing (aka micro-manufacturing) leverages the ever lowering costs of robotic manufacturing systems and (importantly) the lowering cost of programming such robots, to compete against the cost-efficiencies of huge factories in lower labor-cost countries. 

Technology manufacturing firms have traditionally driven costs down through economies of scale and labor savings. However, the global supply chain crunch due to the pandemic and slow-moving trade wars, coupled with rising labor costs globally, is causing a change in the equilibrium of manufacturing. 

Edge manufacturing employs robotic technologies and short-run production automation to deliver specialised products at a faster rate, at costs that are within the realm of those offered by large scale manufacturing, when transport, warehousing and related global supply chain costs are considered.  Edge manufacturing is less susceptible (though not immune) to global supply chain disruptions. 

Most importantly, edge manufacturing is highly agile and their entire manufacturing process is verifiable, making the model attractive for security conscious buyers. Finally, firms that locate their facilities here are covered by Australian laws and are therefore required to be certified to a compliance standard to ensure the level of data security is being met.

Who’s impacted

  • CIO
  • CFO
  • Procurement managers

What’s Next?

IBRS believes that the national economy has a solid potential to benefit from edge manufacturing.  Recent economic modelling by IBRS and Insight Economics noted a 10% increase in organisations buying Australian software (as opposed to US and European solutions) would return close to a $1.5 billion uplift in the economy within a decade. This economic benefit would be significantly magnified if hardware was added.

Organisations can examine the premium put on closer collaboration with suppliers and vendors through this business model by:

  • Running a hypothetical stress tests on their current supply chain to understand how it affects their financial standing
  • Utilising local vendors while considering a third party risk assessment and compliance program that will fit their cyber security strategy
  • Assessing a vendor’s governance framework using the IBRS Vendor Governance Maturity Model

Related IBRS Advisory

  1. How does your organisation manage cyber supply chain risk?
  2. Vendor governance framework (VGF): Evaluate maturity to manage growth and risks
  3. Strategic vendor management in government
  4. Challenges when conducting business impact analysis

IBRSiQ is a database of client inquiries and is designed to get you talking to our advisors about these topics in the context of your organisation in order to provide tailored advice for your needs.


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The Latest

16 November 2021: Oracle recently launched the Oracle Industries Innovation Lab as part of its commitment to supporting the 2021 UN Climate Change Conference’s (COP26) climate goal of lowering global temperature by 1.5 degrees. The facility, located in Reading, UK, is set to open in the spring of 2022 and will become a sustainable town centre dedicated to creating solutions to fight against climate change. It will feature wind turbines, electric vehicles and a simulated train station with a railcar made from repurposed materials. Oracle’s first innovation lab was built in Chicago in 2018 to host tools and technology for testing in simulated worksite environments.  

Why it’s Important

Other new tech initiatives that were introduced during the conference include:

  • Salesforce announced its US$300 million investment in reforestation and ecosystem restoration over the next ten years. It will donate technology through its nonprofit program and commit 2.5 million volunteer hours to organisations that work on climate change initiatives.
  • Amazon pledged US$2 billion to transform inadequate food systems and restore landscapes. Its aviation unit, Amazon Air, which operates exclusively to cater to the business’s cargo operations, also vowed to use sustainable aviation fuels (SAF) together with other major US airlines.
  • Rolls Royce secured the backing of the British government to develop the country’s first small modular nuclear reactor to deploy low carbon energy and replace its aging nuclear plants.

In 2008, an IBRS study found that the majority (25% rating it as a high priority, 59% rating it as somewhat of a priority) of ANZ organisations had a strong mandate for the executive to reduce the environmental impact of IT. However, interest in sustainable computing has plummeted year on year, and by 2019, less than 5% of CIOs rated sustainable ICT as a high priority. 

Recent climate events, and shifting public opinions are now seeing the trend reverse sharply. Initial data from a 2020-2021 study (not yet complete) suggests that once again most private and public organisations are joining the call for immediate action on climate change, with 24% of respondents stating it is a high priority.

All hyperscale Cloud vendors are promoting their carbon footprint and energy consumption credentials.. 

CIOs should expect increased demand to balance success in terms of investment returns and the impact on the environment, especially when pledging their support for man-made carbon capture innovations. Transparency and clarity through specifics in planning and execution of net zero transitions are the keys to speeding up the progress of such initiatives.

Who’s impacted

  • CIO
  • CFO
  • Data centre leads
  • Infrastructure architects

What’s Next?

CIOs must revisit their Green IT strategies and consider revising areas that do not meet proactive and incremental operational eco-efficiencies as well as cleaner processes. This includes focusing on infrastructure efficiencies and implementing energy management that takes action out of boardroom discussions and into actual practice.

In addition, more gains will be realised in the coming years through cleantech, with Cloud computing being a major contributor to carbon emission reductions, as we concluded in our 2021 study. CIOs must consider benefits such as this when designing their Green IT strategy.

Related IBRS Advisory

  1. VENDORiQ: Cloud Vendors will Push New Wave of Sustainable ICT Strategies
  2. Building your Green IT strategy
  3. VENDORiQ: More Evidence for Cloud Leading Sustainable ICT Charge

The Latest

16 November 2021: BlackLine launched its new accounts receivable (AR) tool, which it claims is the first unified platform for end-to-end cash flow optimisation in the industry. The software features intelligent optical character recognition (OCR) to eliminate manual work and reduce process errors. It also allows the predictability of customer payments when building cash flow forecasts. 

Why it’s Important

More organisations are adopting e-invoicing to take advantage of automation features, reduced printing costs, shorter payment delays and faster delivery times. As noted in our previous advisory The ERP: A critical IT application for the business, more Australian organisations are joining the trend of transforming their finance processes by replacing their ERP finance systems with a scalable Cloud-based ERP system that offers seamless integration to other business applications and streamlines backend business processes. 

Recently, IBRS conducted a study into the economics of ERP and Cloud solutions to find out the best ROI on their tech investments. A common answer among mid-size organisations and government agencies is the value of financial automation in relation to labour hours. On average, they reported productivity savings of between 0.5 and 3 full-time equivalent (FTE) roles when they switched to e-invoicing. Interestingly, the same benefit was cited by respondents in our 2019-2020 study on local governments in the country.

There are challenges to e-invoicing adoption, however. Apart from the perceived complexity and difficulty of most organisations in getting up to speed in their transition, employees worry about the threat of being made redundant in the near future.

IBRS discovered, however, that senior leadership teams transfer employees impacted by the reduction in labour hours to other roles where their skills are applicable. Organisations that go down this path gain more control in carefully managing their employee concerns. E-invoicing has become a foundational solution for better process management to establish digital relationships with their partners and internal staff.

Who’s impacted

  • CFO
  • CIO

What’s Next?

Before upgrading the financial platform, review the context of your current organisational and ICT strategy. Consider how the platform supports full ‘end-to-end’ processes that are integrated with other business software systems so that appropriate touchpoints are captured and understood. By doing so, the platform can meet its expected impact on your financial metrics and process requirements.

Related IBRS Advisory

  1. A review of ERP finance systems
  2. The ERP: A critical IT application for the business
  3. Replace or reinvigorate today's ERP Solution now
  4. Turning data analysis from an art to a science

The Latest

09 November 2021: Amazon Web Services (AWS) announced the availability of Babelfish for Amazon Aurora. Babelfish enables its hyperscale Aurora relational database service to understand Microsoft SQL Server and PostgreSQL commands. This allows customers to run applications written for Microsoft SQL Server directly on Amazon Aurora with minimal modifications in the code. 

Why it’s Important.

This new feature in Amazon Aurora, means enterprises with legacy applications can migrate to the Cloud without the time, effort and huge costs involved in rewriting application codes. In addition, using Babelfish benefits organisations through:

  • Reduced migration costs and no expensive lock-in licensing terms, unlike in commercial-grade databases
  • No interruption in existing Microsoft SQL Server database use since Babelfish can handle the TDS network protocol
  • Availability of the open-source version of Babelfish for PostgreSQL on GitHub under the permissive Apache 2.0 and PostgreSQL licenses 

Who’s impacted

  • CIO
  • Development team leads
  • Business analysts

What’s Next?

More general availability of hyperscale Cloud computing to support scalability and high-performance needs is expected in the coming months from major vendors. The most successful ones will require minimal changes in enterprises' existing SQL Server application code, speed of migration, and ease of switching to other tools post-migration.

Related IBRS Advisory

  1. VENDORiQ: Google Next: Data - PostgreSQL Spanning the Globe
  2. VENDORiQ: Google introduces Database Migration Service

The Latest

28 October 2021: The US Senate voted unanimously to deny Huawei and ZTE from supplying equipment to US enterprises due to national security threats that would violate the Secure Equipment Act. Once approved by Pres. Joe Biden, the companies will not be granted equipment licenses by the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) under its ‘Covered Equipment or Services List’. A few days before, the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) raided PAX Technology's Jacksonville warehouse after reports of alleged transmission of malware through the Chinese manufacturer's point-of-sale (PoS) terminals.

Why it’s Important.

As a member of Five Eyes (FVEY), an alliance of countries including Canada, New Zealand, the UK and the US, for joint cooperation in signals, military and human intelligence, Australia has previously followed the US in cutting off suspicious foreign tech companies' domestic presence due to national security concerns.

  • Australia blacklisted Huawei and ZTE in 2018 from selling 5G equipment. The two firms vehemently dismissed accusations over high-speed mobile network espionage, citing discriminatory tactics even with a no-backdoor agreement. 
  • In the same year, the Australian Defence Department banned messaging and payment app WeChat for failing to meet the organisation's standards for use on networks and mobile devices but not necessarily because of security and privacy issues.
  • In late October 2021, PoS terminals from PAX were detected sending anomalous network traffic, which has seen formal requests to replace the equipment due to security concerns. 

The fundamental issue here is supply chain security - the ability of nation state actors to inject spyware (or other malware) into equipment that is broadly used globally. Even where the security risks are not validated, the potential remains. It must also be noted that in the recent past, allies of Australia have engaged in such activities.

With the current geopolitics on global telecommunications being influenced by the US, sweeping impacts on the global supply chain and reduced competition in the market are likely.  

IBRS expects this technology supply spat will expand into areas outside of telecommunications, such as industrial control systems and PoS. Any widespread technology that can be used to impact or monitor aspects of national economies are likely targets.

Who’s impacted

  • Telecommunications procurement

What’s Next?

For organisations considering foreign-manufactured tech products and services, look more closely at the implications of selecting such equipment or platforms. While there is still no public evidence on the credibility of allegations against specific state actors, senior leaders must take security concerns in their organisation and assess the risks they are willing to take when selecting any vendor.

In addition to the security risks, there are also reputational risks, and risks associated with having to replace key solutions, such as is the case with the PAX PoS hardware.

Related IBRS Advisory

  1. Choosing Huawei could be risky - but not why you think
  2. Are you FRUSTRATED with procurement? Why procurement often goes off the rails

Conclusion: A zero trust posture is critical as the global workforce has transitioned to remote work at scale brought about by COVID-19. The need to evolve from perimeter-based cyber security measures emphasises the crucial role of least privilege in Cloud environment access and micro-segmentation in digital networks.

The slow adoption of zero trust among enterprises is in part due to the difficulty in implementing key technologies and the associated security skills and practices. It is also because security teams do not engage with the C-suite to explain and sell the importance of zero trust for the modern workplace.

In this paper, IBRS provides a high-level overview of zero trust aimed at educating executive stakeholders to the needs, benefits and challenges. Ensuring senior business stakeholders understand the drivers for zero trust is essential, as the model is more than just technology – it demands a change in the mindset of how to approach cyber risk.


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IBRS advisor Joseph Sweeney said there was plenty of evidence that new entrants like ClickUp could make a splash in the “projects-oriented collaboration” space, where often there was a lack of standardisation of software used within individual organisations. Joseph Sweeney went onto say, Atlassian was relatively well entrenched with many customers across the different areas it served, and that ClickUp was more likely to be a threat to the raft of other smaller software players vying for the market.

Full Story.

Australian enterprise software-as-a-service (SaaS) platform TechnologyOne commissioned first of its kind analysis from IBRS and Insight Economics found that fast-tracking a shift away from legacy on-premise systems would deliver $224 billion in economic uplift.

The $224 billion in economic benefits that are outlined in the TechOne report – which was produced independently by IBRS and Insight Economics and commissioned by TechnologyOne – were validated using the Monash Multiregional Forecasting (MMRF) model, which is frequently used by federal and state governments in the evaluation of new policy proposals and investment.

Full Story.

The Latest

02 November 2021: Snowflake recently released the Snowflake Media Data Cloud that allows access to real-time, ready-to-query data products, and services from more than 175 data providers. The data-sharing company announced that its product can combine consumer data across sectors to reduce data latency and improve accuracy.

Why it’s Important.

More Australian organisations now recognise that access to external data enables enterprises to create one-to-one or one-to-many relationships for more reliable insights into data. Since it is difficult for businesses to make sense of data they don’t generate themselves, sharing information between internal business units inside the same company or between outside organisations, has narrowed insight gaps aside from lowering the cost of data collection and research. Some recent developments in this area include the following institutions that have extended their data sharing:

  • In 2014, Coles revealed that its online shoppers using Flybuys would have their personal information shared with 30 companies under the same Coles umbrella as well as with third parties in more than 23 countries.
  • Woolworths first started granting access to its consumer shopping behaviour data with all of its suppliers in 2017 to support collaborative decision-making with a customer-centric approach. However, it remains obstinate against disclosing all companies that handle its data when asked to submit comments during the Privacy Act review in 2021.
  • In June 2021, Bunnings announced an upgrade of its tech platform to capture customer information to improve buyer experience. Its privacy policy page explicitly discusses how information is shared with third party businesses such as financial searches, security providers, market research firms, and payment collectors.
  • Likewise, Target Australia discloses customer information to its service providers based overseas and to external call centres, recruitment companies and external fulfilment businesses. 

Ensuring the rights of consumers whose data is being shared can be an issue and apprehensions about maintaining privacy and confidentiality are often raised. The government introduced open banking across the country to provide consumers greater control of their personal data, and with whom it is shared, when applying for banking services.

Enterprises in the data-sharing environment must also find ways to ensure fair and equitable advantage of the information by accessing the same level of data insights as their competitors do. 

Who’s impacted

  • CIO
  • Development team leads
  • Business analysts

What’s Next?

Enterprises need to address the challenges of sharing large scale datasets, such as adherence to legislative and ethical frameworks, using personally identifiable information (PII) for testing, defining the critical role of service providers and their limitations, and improving the overall context of each shared data environment. This can be achieved if policies, procedures and standards on data privacy and security are aligned with data ethics that engender trust among the myriad direct and indirect actors involved in data sharing. Whatever goals such practice entails (such as developing innovative ancillary products with business partners or improving customer care by analysing real-time dashboards for rapid issue resolution), making the best use of opportunities in the field needs to be secure, lawful, just and ethical to ensure that collaboration leads to better decision making when building upon the work of others and fostering a culture of trust. 

Related IBRS Advisory

  1. Beyond privacy to trust: The need for enterprise data ethics
  2. Three ways to turn employee engagement results into actionable and achievable plans
  3. Data loss by the back door, slipping away unnoticed
  4. How Australia must use the PageUp data breach to become stronger - AFR - 18th June 2018