Joseph Sweeney

Joseph Sweeney

Dr. Joseph Sweeney is an IBRS advisor specialising in the areas of workforce transformation and the future of work, including; workplace strategies, end-user computing, collaboration, workflow and low code development, data-driven strategies, policy, and organisational cultural change. He is the author of IBRS’s Digital Workspaces methodology. Dr Sweeney has a particular focus on Microsoft, Google, AWS, VMWare, and Citrix. He often assists organisations in rationalising their licensing spend while increasing workforce engagement. He is also deeply engaged in the education sector. Joseph was awarded the University of Newcastle Medal in 2007 for his studies in Education, and his doctorate, granted in 2015, was based on research into Australia’s educational ICT policies for student device deployments.

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Conclusion:

There are many low-code myths in the market, some promoted by vendors and others touted by development teams that are resisting the trend. IBRS explores and debunks these myths.


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Conclusion:

Organisations must evolve practical and sustainable governance when incorporating low-code platforms into their enterprise architecture (EA). The majority of organisations will use more than one low code platform on their digital transformation journey. As a result, governance will need to encompass tenets that determine which tools (and thus skills and teams) are most appropriate for which types of applications and workflows.


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Too often, information communications technology (ICT) and business analytics groups focus on business intelligence and analytics architectures and do not explore the organisational behaviours that are required to take full advantage of such solutions. There is a growing recognition that data literacy (a subset of digital workforce maturity) is just as important, if not more important, than the solutions being deployed. This is especially true for organisations embracing self-service analytics.

The trend is to give self-service analytics platforms to management that are making critical business decisions. However, this trend also requires managers to be trained in not just the tools and platforms, but in understanding how to ask meaningful questions, select appropriate data (avoiding bias and cherry-picking), and how to apply the principles of scientific thinking to analysis.

Log in and click the PDF above to download the IBRS presentation kit to kickstart your journey. 


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Conclusion:

Virtual Desktop Infrastructure (VDI) implementation involves identifying whether VDI can be done internally or outsourced through a third party, seeking out and engaging a supplier, and finally, determining the cost-effective and efficient way to deploy the service.


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Conclusion:

Employee empowerment is the basic principle behind activity-based working (ABW). In order to make ABW work, a company’s culture needs to shift from command and control to trust, responsibility, and empowerment. As organisations plan their return-to-office strategy, an opportunity exists to decide if workplace defaults will continue, or the lessons learned from working through a pandemic will be incorporated to accommodate a more holistic approach to getting work done.


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IBRSiQ is a database of Client inquiries and is designed to get you talking to our advisors about these topics in the context of your organisation in order to provide tailored advice for your needs.


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Contract management can be more than just record keeping. When done well, it can enable organisations to explore the best ways to optimise their investments when conditions change.

This capability proved essential for the Australian government when COVID-19 hit, with investments in all manner of services and infrastructure being needed almost overnight.

IBRS interviews ZEN Enterprise, an Australian niche contract management solution vendor, and the contract manager from a large Australian agency to tease out the benefits and challenges of advanced contract management in an age of rapid change.

IBRS interviews Dr Kevin McIsaac, a data scientist who frequently works with board-level executives to identify and prototype powerful data-driven decision support solutions.

Dr McIsaac discusses why so may 'big data' efforts fail, the role ICT plays (or rather, should not play) and the business-first data mindset.

IBRSiQ is a database of Client inquiries and is designed to get you talking to our advisors about these topics in the context of your organisation in order to provide tailored advice for your needs.


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The government’s new tax incentives making it easier to depreciate software will help big businesses invest in their own software development but will do “bugger all” for Australian software companies and small and medium businesses, and may even create perverse incentives for large companies to invest in the wrong type of software, industry experts say.

IBRS advisor Joseph Sweeney, who works with numerous large organisations on their technology strategies said the policy was a positive step in recognising the need to increase development of a local digital services economy, but would do little to raise productivity in the small- and medium-sized business market, which accounts for half of Australia’s workforce. Dr Sweeney is midway through conducting a study into national productivity gains from Cloud services, and said the early data showed that introducing Software-as-a-Service solutions to small and mid-sized organisations was the quickest way to get tangible productivity gains.as
 
“By only allowing for offset in assets like CapEx in IT infrastructure and software, this policy has the potential to skew the market back towards on-premises solutions. It will certainly make the ‘total cost of operation’ calculations for moving to the Cloud less attractive,” Dr Sweeney said.
 

Conclusion

The growing maturity of data handling and analytics is driving interest in data catalogues. Over the past two years, most of the major vendors in the data analytics field have either introduced or are rapidly evolving their products to include data cataloguing.

Data catalogues help data users identify and manage their data for processing and analytics. Leading data cataloguing tools leverage machine learning (ML) and other search techniques to expose and link data sets in a manner that improves access and consumability.

However, a data catalogue is only beneficial when the organisation already has a sufficient level of maturity in how it manages data and analytics. Data literacy (the skills and core concepts that support data analytics) must also be established in the organisation’s user base to leverage full benefits from the proposed data catalogue.

Organisations considering data catalogues must have a clear picture of how to use this new architecture, and be realistic in how ready they are to leverage the technology. Furthermore, different organisations have unique and dynamic data attributes, so there is no one-type-fits-all data catalogue in the marketplace.


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Conclusion

Low-code solutions expand the entry-level for application development by enabling non-developers (a.k.a. citizen developers) and developers alike to create applications visually. Low-code platform solutions allow citizen developers to develop applications using WYSIWYG tools to create functional prototypes of applications that digitise special – often narrowly defined – business processes. This can be highly disruptive without clear policies (see ‘Non-techies Are Taking Over Your Developers’ Jobs – Dealing with the Fallout’). In addition, to avoid the Microsoft access problem of creating fragmented applications and processes, the ICT group needs to be involved in the selection of a low-code platform that provides not only eforms and workflow capabilities, but also governance features to avoid the chaos that can ensue from unfettered development.

Low-code platforms can be viewed as offering a spectrum of capabilities, as detailed in ‘How to Succeed with Eforms Part 1: Understand the Need'. To provide a smooth transition along the spectrum of development capabilities, organisations may either:

  • introduce a second developer-focused low-code platform, since many citizen-developer-focused solutions have insufficient capabilities for developers.
  • adopt a single, low-code platform that provides both the simplicity needed for citizen developers and the power needed for developers.

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Conclusion

Virtual desktop infrastructure (VDI) is suitable for addressing a range of business challenges. As VDI has evolved over the past decade, understanding of use-cases for where is best applied has also matured. In this paper, we explore the use-cases where VDI has been most successful.


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Conclusion:

While some bots may be benign, many are engaged in unscrupulous behaviour, such as stealing valuable commercial data or attempting to obtain access illegitimately. At best, bots are a drain on an organisation's resources, increase demands on infrastructure and causing the expenditure of resources, pushing up costs. In the worst case, they represent a significant cyber threat.

IBRS interviewed experts in the field of bot defence: Craig Templeton, CISO and GM Tech Platforms with REA Group and Sam Crowther, developer of the Kasada bot defence platform.


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