Joseph Sweeney

Joseph Sweeney

Dr. Joseph Sweeney is an IBRS advisor specialising in the areas of workforce transformation and the future of work, including; workplace strategies, end-user computing, collaboration, workflow and low code development, data-driven strategies, policy, and organisational cultural change. He is the author of IBRS’s Digital Workspaces methodology. Dr Sweeney has a particular focus on Microsoft, Google, AWS, VMWare, and Citrix. He often assists organisations in rationalising their licensing spend while increasing workforce engagement. He is also deeply engaged in the education sector. Joseph was awarded the University of Newcastle Medal in 2007 for his studies in Education, and his doctorate, granted in 2015, was based on research into Australia’s educational ICT policies for student device deployments.

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Conclusion: Software Asset Management (SAM) is a widely overlooked and misunderstood practice. Over the last five years IBRS has seen a marked rise in organisations finding themselves out of compliance due to immature SAM practices, and this is resulting in licensing exposure ranging from hundreds of thousands, to millions of dollars. This rise is partly due to the more aggressive stance of software vendors, namely Microsoft, Adobe and Autodesk. However, it is mainly due to a lack of awareness among IT professionals of the financial risks of not having SAM, and the potential benefits of getting SAM right. IT executives should determine the benefits SAM brings to their organisation, and articulate these to senior business executives.


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Conclusion: Given previous uncertainties regarding the future of TRIM, and dissatisfaction with what is perceived to be onerous knowledge management, IBRS has noted that many organisations are considering replacing TRIM with SharePoint. Simply migrating to SharePoint will not alleviate the perceived problems associated with TRIM, nor indeed traditional EDRMS in general. Organisations should recognise that while knowledge management is more important than ever, it will not be met with a single solution. Instead, multiple repositories for different types of knowledge, at different stages of the knowledge lifecycle will be required.


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Conclusion: Microsoft’s licensing for its end user products (Windows, Office) attempts to straddle the old desktop-bound paradigm and the new user-centric paradigm brought to the fore by mobility, cloud services and consumerisation of end points. This has resulted in a fragmented and complex set of intertwined usage rights that can confound even the most astute procurement specialist. The only workable approach is to prepare long-term scenarios that deal with specific end-user situations and have Microsoft develop and confirm the licensing requirement in writing prior to deployment: plan for more dynamic application deployment, but externalise the effort, time, costs and risk of the licensing decision back to Microsoft.


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Conclusion: A new category of service provider is emerging in the cloud ecosystem: ‘Cloud Integration Services’. Cloud Integration Services will have significant implications for IT planning, investments, and the extent to which IT can maintain control over architecture and standards. Understanding the role of Cloud Integration Services, their strengths, their limitations, and the likely impact on traditional IT groups is essential for any organisation that is engaged with, or considering being engaged with cloud services – which is everyone.


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Conclusion: The concept of work context provides a framework to examine how staff interact with technology, information and their environment when performing different tasks. Without considering work context, mobility strategies can become overly focused on a single delivery channel for mobility – usually handheld devices such as tablets and smartphones – and miss other opportunities.


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Related Articles:

"Coping with Mobility - Part 3: aligning generic use cases to application development approaches" IBRS, 2012-04-30 00:00:00

"Coping with Mobility - part 1: mobile architecture and the enterprise" IBRS, 2012-02-28 00:00:00

"Coping with Mobility - Part 2: First steps towards a holistic mobility strategy" IBRS, 2012-03-29 00:00:00

"Coping with mobility - part 4: governance" IBRS, 2012-05-31 00:00:00

"Coping with mobility - part 5: developing the strategy" IBRS, 2012-10-28 00:00:00

Conclusion: Organisations looking at building enterprise mobile applications too often put the device selection and coding tools selection as their primary concerns. Instead, organisations should be focusing on identifying the mobility architectures need to support business strategy. Technological priorities then become identification of broad mobile service platforms, integration infrastructure and abstraction of the client.


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As the market ecosystem changes, so too do the dominant species. The introduction of Internet and – more importantly – wireless Internet, has changed the IT landscape to such a degree that new dominant species are emerging rapidly: IBM is something of a dinosaur now, shrunk to a stroppy old crocodile; Apple kept its DNA of excellence in branding, evolving from a tasty Macintosh, into a Venus flytrap; and Google is a clever and adaptive monkey; and then there is the mammoth in the room, Microsoft.


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Conclusion: IT managers and purchasing officers need to be aware of recent changes in Microsoft’s licensing and evolving interpretations of licensing terms, or face surprises during true up and licensing negotiations that Microsoft will use to its advantage.


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Conclusion: Rather than building specific solutions for individual, mobile form and workflow applications, organisations should look towards identifying the most appropriate overarching mobile forms architecture from which many different forms-oriented solutions can be realised.


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Conclusion: The Mobile Document Library is one of the three most common generalised use cases. It provides an enterprise answer to the growing ‘drop box’ problem where users are utilising unmanaged public cloud services to gain mobile access to corporate documentation. While unchecked distribution of enterprise documents should be addressed, any solution put forward by IT must have a user experience that is at least as good as cloud-based, consumer-oriented solutions. In addition, the cost savings of automating mobile document distribution can often pay for a fleet of mobile devices: and therefore mobile document libraries can be used to introduce the foundations for a larger mobility initiative.


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Conclusion: Based on recent survey data and interviews conducted by IBRS, the position of Windows 8 in Australian enterprises is likely to be limited to specific use-cases and tablets / hybrid devices, or those with security policies that mandate N-2 versions of the desktop OS. As predicted, Windows 7 will dominate the enterprise and it is our prediction that Windows 7 is set to be the next Windows XP.


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Many organisations are seeing growing demandand discussion around mobility and mobile ap-plications, in particular in the Networks Group.In theory, mobility can enable significant businessinnovation and optimisation of business process-es. However, few organisations have been able toclarify the benefits of mobility in terms that arealigned to their organisational goals and visionsstatements. This challenge is exacerbated by therapid innovation and changes underway in themobility market.

What is needed to address these problems is aconsistent, repeatable process that embeds mo-bility into the organisation’s overall IT Strategy.At the same time, mobility needs to be treatedslightly differently to many traditional projectsof work, as most mobility initiatives are smaller,with shorter deliver times, than large system de-ployments, but of often intimately interconnectedwith, and enabled by, the traditional larger backend systems.

To meet this challenge, IBRS developed its Mobil-ity Strategy Methodology, which provides a formalframework and process.


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Conclusion: Windows 8 desktops are being largely sidestepped by IT managersresponsible for desktop deployments in the enterprise, with many desktop managers suggesting Windows 7 will reign supreme for at least the next 5-7 years. However, many of these managers do see a role for Windows 8 as a solution for enterprise mobility. Windows 8 tablets address most desktop manager’s concerns: manageable, secure, support for existing software and software deployment methods. But users have a very different set of concerns. Desktop managers need to base future solutions on the users’ concerns first and foremost, which means that Windows 8 tablets, or any device for that matter, will not be a panacea for mobility.


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Sometimes IT managers feel like Santa: lots of kiddies storming their armchair, sitting on their laps, demanding the latest must-have toys. But unlike Santa, IT managers don’t have a secret ice bunker full of unpaid yet highly-skilled elves, nor can they deploy their gifts faster than the speed of light via magic flying reindeer. No. Instead, they’re lumbered with the financial constraints of The Grinch.

The only hope for them is to figure out the most popular gift and give it to all the kids. This year’s must have gift is mobility. No question about it, it’s the hands-down favourite toy of screaming kiddies and frustrated executives the world over.


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