Joseph Sweeney

Joseph Sweeney

Dr. Joseph Sweeney is an IBRS advisor specialising in the areas of workforce transformation and the future of work, including; workplace strategies, end-user computing, collaboration, workflow and low code development, data-driven strategies, policy, and organisational cultural change. He is the author of IBRS’s Digital Workspaces methodology. Dr Sweeney has a particular focus on Microsoft, Google, AWS, VMWare, and Citrix. He often assists organisations in rationalising their licensing spend while increasing workforce engagement. He is also deeply engaged in the education sector. Joseph was awarded the University of Newcastle Medal in 2007 for his studies in Education, and his doctorate, granted in 2015, was based on research into Australia’s educational ICT policies for student device deployments.

Read latest work...

Connect with Joseph

Have a specific question for Joseph Sweeney?

Email

Conclusion: Microsoft Office 365 represents the biggest change in Microsoft since the departure of Bill Gates. While Microsoft’s evolution of its Business Productivity Online Suite to Office 365 is interesting from a technology perspective, the most important aspect of this announcement is Office 365’s licensing: Microsoft will finally offer its Office suite on a per-user basis. We now have an entirely new Microsoft licensing landscape to work with. The new licensing and deployment possibilities provided by Office 365 should be examined as part of new SOE (Standard Operating Environment) initiatives.


Read more


Conclusion: Over the past two decades, management of the Student Information Systems (SIS) was generally in the domain of each school’s Administration. However, recent investments from the Digital Education Revolution, coupled with increasing State and Federal demands for ‘accountability’ in education, have promoted the SIS to centre stage. Essential SIS functionality now goes well beyond basic student records as it contains comparable functionality to that found in an ERP (Enterprise Resource Planning) solution, along with the complexities and extent of customisations required.


Read more


Conclusion: IBRS will be delivering research series covering the ramifications of new mobility and "consumerisation" of technology. In this first note, we provide an overview of current trends and make predictions on the shape of things to come.

While the introduction of the iPhone represented a milestone in consumer devices impacting IT decision-making within organisations, many strategic planners have been struggling to predict where trends in consumer technology will take us. Recent market shifts in Europe, the USA and even in Australia now provide a clear path as to how, where and why consumer devices will drive change in organisational IT. The ramifications for how enterprise solutions are developed and deployed are profound and should be top of mind for any CIO… and the COO, CFO and CEO.


Read more


Conclusion: Organisations planning a migration from earlier versions of Office to Office 2007 or Office 2010 need to conduct an 'Office Readiness Assessment' prior to the migration - or risk significant business disruption. Rather than developing in-house assessments skills , a short term engagement with consultants experienced in Office file scanning tools and migration technologies is likely to be the most cost-effective, timely and lowest risk approach to safeguarding business continuity during Office migrations.


Read more


Conclusion: Microsoft’s Windows Mobile platform has a long heritage in the enterprise, but in the past five years its market share has decayed as a tsunami of consumer-oriented smartphones hit the market. Microsoft’s latest offering, Windows Phone 7, is a big step up from its previous mobile offering, but it is unlikely that it will be able to bury the iPhone, as Microsoft attempted to imply recently1. However, the platform has a strong story to tell with regards to enterprise mobility.


Read more


Conclusion:  For many organisations, the issue is not if, but when and how they will move to Windows 7. IBRS has identified three key phases that must be worked through prior to making the move to Windows 7 (or indeed an alternative desktop environment).


Read more


Conclusion: Creation of an enterprise strategy for printing services and printing often revolves around the issue of shared (or centralised) printing resources versus local (desktop) printers. The common approach is to use a TCO model to identify which approach is most suitable. However, simplistic TCO models miss important secondary financial and workplace benefits. When creating an enterprise printing strategy, one must look deeper into the TCO model.


Read more


My dog is cloud computing and I think you should invest in him. For a start, he’s a total mongrel and everyone has a different opinion about what he actually is. No one will ever be able to clearly define him because they all look at him and see what they want. In that respect he’s exactly like cloud computing. Some people see him as infrastructure, others as a platform for applications and others see something between. One thing is certain though, no matter what you think my dog is, he’s fuzzy.


Read more


Conclusion: Electronic documents and records management solutions (EDRMS) from yesteryear are failing to provide the flexibility and collaborative experiences that today’s organisations require. In most organisations, less than 10% of content has been placed in existing EDRMSs. However, investing in a new EDRMS will not result in greater satisfaction levels if new principles are not first adopted.


Read more


Conclusion: Traditional approaches to web application performance optimisation have focused on the physical network infrastructure, WAN optimisation, and to a lesser extent application development. As web applications become mainstream, the complex issue of ensuring they remain responsive has received increased attention.

Web application performance is impacted by physical infrastructure, application design, software, specialised services and WAN optimisation. This begs the question, who is actually responsible for a web application’s performance? IBRS recommends that a single person, or team, be responsible for end-to-end web application performance, with direct governance of the physical infrastructure, software and services needed.


Read more


Conclusion: Organisations that have fleets of Windows XP desktops will soon find themselves squeezed to either embark on a rushed migration to Windows 7 or pushed into purchasing additional licensing from Microsoft. IT Professionals managing the transition to a new Managed Operating Environment (MOE) must factor in Microsoft’s convoluted licensing options or run the risk of encountering higher than expected costs.


Read more


Conclusion: Organisations that still have Windows XP as their Standard Operating Environments (SOE), and those that have plans to stay with XP for near term, need to tread carefully with regards to Microsoft’s licensing. While remaining compliant with Microsoft’s licensing will not necessarily incur significant costs, falling out of compliance will be costly. Organisations without Software Assurance and those without an active Microsoft Volume Licensing Agreement at risk with regards to falling out of compliance, especially if purchasing desktops with Windows 7 pre-installed.


Read more


Conclusion: In the short-term, the soon to be launched Windows Azure platform is likely to be misunderstood by IT enterprise architects and under-estimated by in-house software developers. The notion of "cloud computing" has become ill-defined and confused. In order to understand where Azure and other cloud based solutions can benefit an enterprise, it is vital to have clear definition of the different classes of cloud computing and the trend of clouds towards greater simplicity at the expense of flexibility.


Read more


Conclusion: Public sector IT departments are facing greater financial scrutiny as a result of both the GFC and the Gershon Report. There is a broad mandate to reduce ‘business as usual’ costs. In order to prioritise projects, manage expectations and drive down IT costs, IT professionals need to understand the key technology trends in the public sector.


Read more