Peter Bickerton

Peter Bickerton

Peter Bickerton is an IBRS advisor covering strategy, program and project governance, developing and critiquing business cases and reviews. Peter is an experienced program board executive in enterprise ICT transformations across business development and national infrastructure replacements.  Peter is an executive mentor and coach improving workplace environments and maximising productivity and improving key stakeholder relationships. Peter has held senior executive positions including CIO and Deputy CEO in both operational and service delivery roles in the Federal Government as well as twenty years of experience in law enforcement both overseas and in Australia.

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Conclusion: BYOD strategies need to be updated regularly to keep pace with the evolving nature of not just the devices themselves but also the increasing challenges and complexity to stay secure; all this needs to occur while offering increasingly flexible services to a 24/7 mobile workforce operating on-premises and offline. It is valuable to engage key stakeholders within the organisation’s leadership team, employee champions and also industry peers to ensure the BYOD strategies are as relevant and acceptable as initially reported in an earlier IBRS article in 20081 when personal electronic devices (PED) were being introduced into corporate networks.


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Conclusion: Growth in ICT remains strong in the foreseeable future in a very competitive market. Successful CIOs and ICT leaders responsible for staffing and sourcing need to adopt multiple strategies to successfully recruit, retain and plan for the resource challenges of tomorrow.


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Conclusion: Most change management processes focus on the traditional approach of identifying problems then analysing the causes of the problems, followed by the identification of possible solutions then arriving at the solution and implementing the same. APIQ focuses on what the organisation does well, then explores and identifies how those strengths and values can be further improved. The results can be dramatic in terms of improving quality of services and products produced, employee satisfaction/engagement and it is also sustainable.


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Conclusion: The initial gathering of momentum for change is difficult enough to generate, but letting that momentum lapse will make it even more challenging next time to generate the passion and endeavour to improve the modus operandi for the long haul.


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Conclusion: The ability to inspire as a leader is becoming more recognised as a core management and leadership skill. What does not change overnight are the most innermost core values of how an inspirational leader behaves. Through their leadership they inspire others to perform and succeed, making a positive difference not just internally within the organisation, but also with every employee who has been touched by their inspirational abilities.


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Conclusion: Effective risk management, whether it is for a change initiative or for ongoing business operations, will ameliorate harm or at the very least reduce the impact of harm. Leaders must understand risk management, and plan and engage with risks and mitigate the risks as appropriate on an ongoing basis.


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Conclusion: Effective ICT project managers are essential to the successful running of any ICT-led change initiative. They provide a necessary level of trust and confidence to the CIO and are a key resource for any effective CIO running a large mix of ongoing and change initiatives.


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Conclusion: The traditional Waterfall method of development delivery is now being increasingly challenged by Agile. The original decision to use Agile primarily based on speed of delivery of the coding and design functions was and still is just one factor. Other factors and characteristics still mean an informed decision must be made to maximise the chances of the project being implemented successfully.


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Conclusion: CTOs need to balance natural technical strengths with traditional leadership skills such as strategic thinking and empathy with others to be initially recruited and then remain as successful CTOs.


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Conclusion: It is not enough to just work hard and deliver results, although these are essential qualities to get noticed. To obtain that elusive CIO job and then keep it requires more ongoing effort and vigilance negotiating, monitoring and engaging at executive levels.


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Conclusion: Leaders play an integral role in setting the team or office culture which, if positive, improves the effectiveness and performance of that team. Be patient as it takes time to turn around a suffering team, even if they are recruited to transform and instil positive cultural change.


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Conclusion: Too often the CIO or program/project executive will focus on the more tangible aspects of developing a new ICT system, bunch of processes, environments and the like only to have the new initiative fail as a result of risk averse and increasingly change weary and cynical employees1. Successful leaders need to spend increasing time and effort on getting all stakeholders on-side at all levels to implement and make sustainable positive change.


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Conclusion: It is easier to assess the applicant against technical skills and experience than assessing against soft skills. The time to assess soft skills is at the interview. Ask behavioural questions and recruit the more Emotionally Intelligent candidate. This applies to every recruitment position no matter how technically important the skills are.


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IBRS iQ is a database of Client inquiries and is designed to get you talking to our Advisors about these topics in the context of your organisation in order to provide tailored advice for your needs. 


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