Dr. Philip Nesci

Dr. Philip Nesci

Dr. Philip Nesci is an IBRS advisor specialising in digital transformation, Cloud strategy and analytics, cyber resilience and risk management, and large scale program management. Philip has an extensive track record as a CIO and an Executive in global commercial organisations such as Shell, Orica and China Light and Power, where he has orchestrated and delivered major organisational transformations enabled by technology. More recently as CIO of Monash Health and the Australian Red Cross Blood Service, Philip has focused on the Health sector and in Government leading a number of programs which have significantly reshaped the customer experience and engagement, underpinned by cyber resilience. Philip’s approach to strategy development and implementation is achieved through strong leadership and extensive engagement with Boards and Executives. Philip’s blend of business and technology experience across a wide range of industries and enhanced by working extensively in Australia, Europe, Asia and the USA, provides him with unique understanding in successfully planning and executing digital strategies to reshape business.

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Philip Nesci, IBRS adviser and former CIO, has warned that agencies will need to get their information management sorted out to capitalise on the new rules.

‘‘Agencies need to identify their high-value data sets and where they are located.’’ 

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Conclusion: Many organisations have implemented collaboration and in particular video-conferencing facilities to support critical business operations in response to managing the COVID-19 pandemic. While remote workers have embraced these platforms with enthusiasm, organisations have had little opportunity to govern the use of these platforms due to the need to roll them out quickly. As end-users push forward with sharing confidential data and video across many teams, issues of data access rights, data confidentiality and employee confusion will emerge. Unless organisations put in place appropriate governance on their collaboration platform, the full benefits of the platform will not be realised.


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Conclusion: Many organisations have now contained the COVID-19 crisis and stabilised their operations. The focus is now rapidly shifting towards the recovery phase. While the full implications of the 'new normal' are yet to be fully understood, it clear that industry sectors will be impacted very differently. What are the three mega trends emerging in the post COVID-19 world.


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Conclusion: The COVID-19 pandemic crisis is sweeping across the globe and is being felt by every individual and every organisation. By its very nature, the COVID-19 crisis is global in scope, indefinite in its duration and unknown in its long-term impact. Given the reliance of organisations on their ICT services, particularly at this point in time, CIOs have a unique opportunity to make a significant contribution, showcase their leadership capability and enhance the long-term brand of their ICT teams. All too often under the pressure of a crisis, CIOs will focus on tasks as opposed to the softer elements of leadership. The opportunities this crisis presents should not be wasted. Your leadership is on show.


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Conclusion: With an ever-increasing number of cyber-related incidents, cyber security risk has evolved from a technical risk to a strategic enterprise risk. While many organisations have enterprise crisis management and business continuity plans, specific plans to deal with various types of cyberattacks are much less common, even though many of the attack scenarios are well known. Every organisation should have an incident response plan in place and should regularly review and test it. Having a plan in place can dramatically limit damage, improve recovery time and improve the resilience of your business.


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Conclusion: With cases of the novel coronavirus (COVID-19) emerging across Australia, many businesses are or should bewell into pandemic planning to ensure they maintain essential services. Teleworking, remote working, or working from home, is a centrepiece of those efforts and will increasingly be implemented by organisations. Cybercrime activity is rising rapidly with actors seeking to exploit the fear and uncertainty in the community. The use of remote working technologies presents additional cyber security challenges that can be different from the more secure on-premise environments. Below is a list of considerations to help guide businesses through these challenges.


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Conclusion: Covid-19 has already had severe global impacts even though the total impact is yet to be fully dimensioned. Further restrictions are foreseen in Australia. Its implications will be long term and disrupt the way we conduct business in future and the way we interact socially and a ‘new normal’ will emerge. No business will be immune and during this dislocation both challenges and opportunities will arise.

At IBRS we believe that it is critical to take the long view on how the crisis will evolve and be prepared for the waves of change which will follow.

Download your COVID-19 Survival Kit Covid-19-Survival-Kit.pdf

Conclusion: Cyber security is now one of the top priorities in many organisations. With an ever-increasing number of cyber-related incidents, cyber security risk has evolved from a technical risk to being regarded as a strategic enterprise risk. The role of the Chief Information Security Officer (CISO) has traditionally required strong technology skills to protect the organisation from security incidents. With boards and executives now requiring executive-level cyber leadership and accountability, the role of the CISO must evolve beyond the traditional technology domain to also encompass strategy, stewardship and compliance as well as being a trusted business advisor.


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Conclusion: Cyber security and data privacy are currently hot topics at both executive and board levels and security incidents feature in the media on an almost weekly basis. CIOs and executive teams will face increasing scrutiny from their boards with a focus on accountability, risk assessment, reporting and organisational resilience to cyber incidents. Boards are genuinely grappling with how to assess risks and how to ensure that the organisation is sufficiently well prepared to protect and respond appropriately to security incidents, within budget and resource constraints. CIOs and CISOs have a unique opportunity to engage with boards and provide the leadership that is expected, as the move to digital accelerates. In this note we highlight the recent trends and outline some of the key recommendations to practical steps to strengthen your organisation’s ability to protect itself holistically from cyber and data loss risks.


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Conclusion: Cloud services have now been around for over a decade and since that time many of the services available have evolved in both scope and maturity. Most organisations now have a range of services in the Cloud and many have adopted a ‘Cloud first’ strategy for new solutions to business problems. However, this reactive approach runs the risk of not leveraging the full potential of Cloud services and creating fragmented infrastructure and applications which inhibit the rapid response to business problems and increase costs in the longer term. What is required is a deliberate strategy which maps out the transition to Cloud at infrastructure, platform and application levels and is integrated with enterprise IT. Given the scale, scope and risks of the strategy, executive and board alignment is critical as is the implementation of appropriate governance.


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