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Conclusion: CRM technology is capable of being put to several discrete purposes. The added complexity of the tools is necessary in the more complex digital communications environment. Even though CRM systems are more adaptable and extensible than before, there are still four central questions to CRM activities.

The central business questions that drive the sales and marketing effort are about communications channels and the use of data. Organisations should be clear about how they answer those four questions as that will assist in the way they manage CRM and its associated capabilities.

Conclusion: The recent enhancements to CRM suites offer deeper and more useful insights into organisational processes. The second and possibly more profound aspect to CRM suites is that they provide the means to evaluate organisational productivity.

Productivity can be seen in ratio terms across the enterprise and therefore the management of assets which can be handled with greater clarity. If organisations chose to use CRM as a productivity management tool, they would need to organise a management team that oversaw such a designated use. It is not a sales or a marketing role but it is a function that finance and those connected with the executive may choose to accept.

Conclusion: Given previous uncertainties regarding the future of TRIM, and dissatisfaction with what is perceived to be onerous knowledge management, IBRS has noted that many organisations are considering replacing TRIM with SharePoint. Simply migrating to SharePoint will not alleviate the perceived problems associated with TRIM, nor indeed traditional EDRMS in general. Organisations should recognise that while knowledge management is more important than ever, it will not be met with a single solution. Instead, multiple repositories for different types of knowledge, at different stages of the knowledge lifecycle will be required.

Conclusion: Customer Relationship Management (CRM) is undergoing major changes. The addition of features, analytics, and high quality data measurement gives users more options than ever to explore how their various customers interact with their organisation.

The substantial enhancements in CRM technologies should encourage organisations to lift their own skills in order to use the power of these tools. To use the CRM tools effectively it may be necessary for people within each department to coordinate their work across different areas of the organisation.

Conclusion: Application portfolio rationalisation offers the promise of reduced ICT maintenance costs while improving data quality, process support and usability for end users, and increasing organisation effectiveness and efficiency.

An effective approach to application portfolio rationalisation involves five steps: 1. understand your business architecture; 2. understand your applications portfolio; 3. develop principles for rationalisation; 4. assess opportunities for rationalisation; and 5. rationalise.

Conclusion: Organisations looking at building enterprise mobile applications too often put the device selection and coding tools selection as their primary concerns. Instead, organisations should be focusing on identifying the mobility architectures need to support business strategy. Technological priorities then become identification of broad mobile service platforms, integration infrastructure and abstraction of the client.

Conclusion: Most organisations that use enterprise resource planning (ERP) software have a need to integrate the ERP system with other enterprise software. It is common for ERP systems to be integrated with customer relationship management software (CRM) and with all the bespoke applications that operate at the core of the business. Some organisations strive to simplify the system integration challenge with a single silver-bullet system integration technology, but this approach only works in the simplest scenarios, when the number of system interfaces is small. Instead, aiming for maintainable integration code leads to better results.

Conclusion: Many organisations in Australia rely on SAP software for enterprise resource planning (ERP) software. To get the best results out of their data, a significant number of organisations have implemented a data warehouse alongside operational systems, and are combining SAP software with best-of-breed technologies for customer relationship management and system integration. Whilst SAP software continues to provide important functionality, it pays to understand to what extent standardisation of ERP functionality makes economic sense, and from what point onwards standardisation reduces the organisation’s ability to deliver unique and valuable services. Standardisation is desirable only if it leads to a system landscape that is simpler and sufficiently resilient.

Conclusion: As outlined in a previous research note1, CIOs need to ensure that external-facing websites support an appropriate range of browsers. This is to ensure websites can be accessed by the largest possible percentage of users per dollar spent on development and testing.

The very public nature of the issue means that it is wide open to criticism. Many CIOs have been called on to explain their position. Astute CIOs will have a clearly defensible support policy that can stand the test of public scrutiny.

Conclusion: Rather than building specific solutions for individual, mobile form and workflow applications, organisations should look towards identifying the most appropriate overarching mobile forms architecture from which many different forms-oriented solutions can be realised.

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