Main
Log in

Applications

Conclusion: Opposition to workplace change stemming from the organisation’s digital strategy agenda1 is inevitable. Astute IT managers expect it and identify initiatives to minimise opposition.

Digital strategy (or transformation) initiatives typically generate both overt and covert workplace resistance. Its sources may vary from situations such as:

  • Senior managers who fear that failure could adversely impact their career
  • Overworked middle managers claiming they cannot cope with more workplace change
  • IT professionals maintaining legacy systems not prepared to learn new skills.

Managers responsible for driving digital strategy agenda must identify where resistance is likely and determine how to minimise it. Assuming no resistance to it is unwise. Alternately, continually questioning the agenda may not reflect opposition but an indication staff are determining how to best implement it.

Conclusion: The options for processing ERP (Enterprise Resource Planning) range from on premises to managed services to public Cloud to SaaS (Software as a Service). The attributes of all the solutions, including the risks, costs and benefits, can appear overwhelming and may persuade risk averse senior management to make an expedient decision and keep the status quo.

IT managers must engage their risk averse peers and force them to think through the issues and make a strategic, rather than an expedient, decision as whatever they decide will have long-term ramifications.

Conclusion: Just as every marketable motor vehicle needs skilful designers and a proficient driver to reach its destination, an organisation needs visionary leaders and skilled staff to digitally transform its business model.

Technology, whilst important, represents just one wheel of the motor vehicle. Overstating technology’s value is simplistic. Vendors who promote technology, and their solution, as the cornerstone of the digital transformation strategy do themselves a disservice.

Conclusion: In a rapidly changing business environment driven by demand for enhanced client services and immediate access to business data, CIOs who can deliver what is needed will thrive. Conversely CIOs unable to meet the CEO’s and Board’s transformation objectives and leverage service providers could quickly find themselves redundant.

Conclusion: Astute managers know that once a project is completed, skilled staff will be reassigned and their recall of the lessons learned and what worked and what did not is quickly lost. This is because corporate memory dissipates the longer the recall is delayed.

Apart from determining whether the objectives of the project were or were not achieved, an open and frank conversation needs to occur regarding the project’s outcomes and stakeholders need to be:

  • Brave enough to admit failures and shortcomings
  • Modest when highlighting successes
  • Generous in giving credit to all who contributed to the project’s success
  • Prepared to adopt practices and approaches that worked well
  • Comfortable in disseminating the review’s findings to all who need to know.

Conclusion: To facilitate business and IT transformation PMOs must be given a role that puts them at the forefront of advising management where best to invest scarce resources in business and IT-related projects whilst ensuring business systems are successfully implemented.

To be successful PMO staff need:

  • People management skills to help project managers reach their potential
  • Business acumen to assess competing claims for funds for business systems projects
  • To be able to shape management’s expectations of what IT can and cannot deliver.

Conclusion: Office 365, like Google Apps, holds the potential to impact workplace practices through new collaboration capabilities such as real-time co-authorship. However, this potential may only be realised if activities for the Office 365 environment go beyond the traditional post-implementation review plan. Instead, organisations wishing to see genuine changes must create a post-implementation review plan which must assess the extent to which business benefits have been delivered over the long-term.

Related Articles:

"The Journey to Office 365" IBRS, 2015-05-01 14:58:56

"The journey to Office 365: A guiding framework Part 1" IBRS, 2016-03-01 04:23:10

"The journey to Office 365: A guiding framework Part 2 migration" IBRS, 2016-04-01 04:43:19

"The journey to Office 365: Part 4 – Skills" IBRS, 2016-06-02 00:26:00

Conclusion: Organisations that fail to develop the skills of their BAs, or give them intellectually challenging roles, are in danger of losing them and their corporate memory. BAs used wisely are often the glue holding complex projects together.

Use them to elicit and simplify business requirements, develop compelling business cases and redesign business processes and the investment will reap dividends. Allocating them mundane tasks and failing to involve them in critical decision making meetings will demotivate them and give them a reason to move on.

Conclusion: Deployment of Office 365 as a pure Cloud solution has lagged the sales of Office 365 licences. This is partly due to lack of formal migration strategies, confusion over the licensing and user options1, although non-technical issues play a bigger role. To assist in the move to Office 365, IBRS has identified a framework that will assist organisations in their journey.

Related Articles:

"The Journey to Office 365" IBRS, 2015-05-01 14:58:56

"The journey of Office 365: A guiding framework Part 3: Post-implementation" IBRS, 2016-05-05 00:21:00

"The journey to Office 365: A guiding framework Part 1" IBRS, 2016-03-01 04:23:10

"The journey to Office 365: Part 4 – Skills" IBRS, 2016-06-02 00:26:00

Conclusion: CIOs continually wrestle with how to replace or modify failing core systems and having to convince management to invest in modernising them. They also know that ignoring a bad situation will probably cost the organisation more to fix the longer they postpone the replacement decision.

In the News

Managed security: a big gamble for Aussie IT providers - CRN - 02 August 2018

TechSci Research estimates the Australian managed security services (MSS) market will grow at a CAGR of more than 15 percent from 2018-23 as a result of the increased uptake of cloud computing and...
Read More...

Kids, Education and The Future of Work with Dr Joseph Sweeney - Potential Psychology - 25 July 2018

What is the future of work and how do we prepare our kids for it? Are schools and universities setting kids up for future success? Does technology in the classroom improve outcomes for kids? Should...
Read More...

PageUp starts rebuilding and looks to learn lessons after data breach nightmare - AFR - 27 June 2018

The timing couldn't have been worse for PageUp; two days before Europe's new data protection regime came into force the Melbourne-based online recruitment specialist's security systems detected...
Read More...

Australia is still in the cyber security dark ages - AFR - 28 June 2018

In terms of cyber security years, Australia is still in the dark ages, a period typified by a lack of records, and diminished understanding and learning. We're only a few months into practising...
Read More...

AMP does maths on infosec shortage - ITnews - 18th June 2018

Cyber security and risk advisor at analyst firm IBRS, James Turner, said the cyber skills shortage was prompting a wider rethink around the domain in terms of resourcing for the last few years....
Read More...

Subscribe to IBRS Updates

Invalid Input
Invalid Input
Please enter a valid email address
Please enter your mobile phone number
Invalid Input

Get in-context advice from our experts about your most pressing issues or areas of interest

Make an Inquiry

Sitemap

Already a subscriber?

Login to read your premium content.

        Forgot your password?
Recently Viewed Articles
Related Articles