Conclusion: This month has seen an increased focus on security threats posed by managed service providers and associated vendors. ICT service providers are attractive targets because they can provide access to a wide variety of customer networks, or can be used as a starting point for other malicious attacks. Compromised commercial or government data, or products which facilitate vendor service provision, can result in serious breaches and unexpected losses. More in-depth reviews of vendor security protocols, products and response measures to threats are required for customers to obtain the best possible protection against attacks launched through their managed service providers.


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Conclusion: The range of channel and customer engagement tools needs thorough and continuous evaluation. There are two challenges to this objective. Firstly, the initial impediment is to gather data from various sources. The second problem is to apply a coherent and durable methodology to all of it.

The greater complexity of technologies and increased channel support means organisations must have a path to understand how their technologies perform. The most common assessment of return on investment can be applied to all data sets but it lacks sophistication. Developing a use-case will help establish a secure methodology which will make clearer the real value of customer satisfaction.


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Conclusion: Chromebooks continue to be viewed mostly as a low-cost alternative to Windows devices. While it is true a Google G Suite/Chromebook only workspace is a considerably lower cost compared to a Microsoft workspace, a careful examination of Chromebooks in a mixed device workplace – which is the norm – reveals that some of the purported savings are overstated.

More significantly, the over-focus on the cost of devices hides the more nuanced reasons for considering Chromebooks and the role they can play in an organisation’s move towards workforce transformation.

In the first of two management advisory papers, IBRS examines the extent to which Chromebooks deliver cost savings.


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Conclusion: Mind mapping is a popular technique to assist with the thinking ability of an individual or team, and to help generate ideas and thoughts. Mind maps literally involve “mapping” out thoughts, using associations, connections and triggers to stimulate further ideas.

Whilst traditional mind maps have been drawn on paper, the availability of mind mapping software provides platforms that can be used within organisations to improve the productivity and creativity of individuals and teams. Additionally, it is possible to do things with digital mind maps that are not possible with a hand-drawn diagram, especially in the area of team collaboration, dynamic links and exporting to other formats such as presentations, websites or project plans.

Standardising on a particular mind mapping application can provide a powerful collaboration tool for all employees in the organisation1. With so many choices available, organisations should define their needs and select an application that best integrates with how they expect to deploy mind mapping.


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Conclusion: The ability to inspire as a leader is becoming more recognised as a core management and leadership skill. What does not change overnight are the most innermost core values of how an inspirational leader behaves. Through their leadership they inspire others to perform and succeed, making a positive difference not just internally within the organisation, but also with every employee who has been touched by their inspirational abilities.


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Conclusion: Cyber security is an area in which organisations do not compete. They each face similar risks and threats, and it is only through the development of trusted relationships and the resulting collaboration that Australian organisations can work together to sustain their own operations and maintain the economic wellbeing of the nation in the face of cyber threats.

There is still a way to go, and leading Chief Information Security Officers (CISOs) with international experience believe we are between six and nine years behind the US and the UK. Australia is coming off a low base, but we are getting better quickly.


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Conclusion: Despite repeated audits pointing to failures by IT to deliver expected outcomes, organisations continue to publish IT plans that do not adequately address the fundamental dimensions of IT planning, being the IT Business Plan, IT Strategies and IT Program of Work.

These elements are often developed as a single composite document, but this approach fails to recognise that each dimension:

  • requires a different method of creation
  • is owned by different stakeholder groups
  • has a different purpose and audience
  • requires renewal on different cycles.

Failure to ensure that all dimensions are addressed presents risks to implementation both in terms of effective up-front investment selection as well as ongoing IT governance arising from gaps in critical decision-making information.

To avoid these risks, organisations should maintain the content of each IT planning element as a separate deliverable even if the desire, or requirement, is to regularly produce an “annually” updated composite document.


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Conclusion: One strategy to implement IT-as-a-Service models is to outsource the IT delivery capability to multiple service providers. However, the IT organisation remains accountable for the success of the outsourced arrangements. This requires the IT organisation to have a mature procurement and service provider governance function. The rationale is to acquire services and negotiate contracts that go beyond meeting the traditional IT needs to provide business innovation, performance improvement, cost reduction and risks mitigation covering IT and business vulnerabilities.


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Conclusion: Australian governments at the federal and state levels have been implementing, modifying, discarding or persevering with shared services models for the better part of 15 years. Most of these initiatives were based on the premise that consolidating corporate service functions into a single entity and providing “shared services” back to the originating agencies would provide significant efficiencies and cost savings. While the concept of shared services does have considerable potential for value creation and efficiencies for government sectors, it is the execution that needs to be rethought.

Shared services operational units need to heed the learnings from other activities including:

  • the entrepreneurial sector
  • application of UCD
  • other service redesign techniques, and effectively generate a spin-off that everyone wants to receive services from.

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