Main
Log in

Guy Cranswick

info@ibrs.com.au

Guy Cranswick was an IBRS advisor between 2002 - 2017 who covered Google (Apps and Search), broadband/NBN, Web 2.0 technology, government and channel strategy, including areas of business productivity. Guy had worked in the UK and France as Strategy Manager for Initiative Media and director of European operations for Modem Media (Poppe Tyson), the first online marketing and development company. In Australia, Guy was Senior Analyst at both Jupiter Communications and GartnerG2 covering online technologies and strategy in Asia-Pacific. He has published analytical articles in business and technology media, including the AFR, and was the winner of the Australian Institute of Management 2003 essay prize on the topic of corporate communications.

Conclusion: The technology adoption cycle and its cousin, the hype cycle, are familiar concepts. While the theory is instructive, there are acknowledged gaps in its explanatory power, and consequently in practical application, although many organisations and vendors implicitly subscribe to the general thrust of the concept.

The steady stream of new technology – including innovations and upgrades - means potential buyers are evaluating products almost continuously; whether as consumers or for businesses. From both sides of the equation, can buyers and sellers make a better bargain with the idea of the adoption cycle? Could buyers be better informed and rational or is there a portion of emotion involved in buying technology? And how does a business adapt the technology adoption cycle to be successful?


Register to read more...


Conclusion: Networking has been a vital element of the Internet, and in organisations it has been formalised on the Web through sites such as Ryze or MySpace. Much of it involves business and technology professionals, and even people with specific political interests. Networks support and stimulate each member, and if harnessed with an agenda, even one as normal as bulk-buying discounts, they can exercise considerable influence.

Networking cannot fulfil all the communications and commercial demands of an organisation; however organisations could be using online networking to their advantage if it fits in with their communication aims.

Networking can be utilised by organisations in two ways:

  1. To generate new contacts or leads

  2. To gain a better understanding of a group or target market.

Initiatives in this area should be tested where possible on sites and through online networks. Adding networking as part of their Web communications can offer organisations a valuable means of working with customers and users and is a means of learning what users and consumers think.


Register to read more...


Marketing is a sometimes crude means of meeting new people and businesses must invest in it, or they wither. For instance there are many brands that have loyal customers, who have used the brand for up to 40 years; but customers don’t live for ever, and the brands inevitably suffer declining sales.


Register to read more...


Conclusion: Marketing can seem the very opposite of IT: lots of look and feel and rather intangible when compared with systems that must deliver on time. Yet IT can inject ideas and methods into marketing across an organisation, and an organisation that harnesses the expertise of its distinct and specialised divisions can realise positive results.

The product of greater cooperation may be several and various in the role of marketing. IT specialists may offer knowledge and expertise with practical effect for marketing strategies. Many marketing solutions involve technology solutions, and coupled with a thorough understanding of processes and the implementation of technologies, an IT manager can play an influential role to a marketing team.


Register to read more...


Conclusion: Five years ago portals were essential to any worthy online strategy; without one, an organisation was not serious about the Web. That sentiment dissipated as portals were seen as symptomatic of the cyber land grab that failed. In the last two years they have quietly reasserted themselves – or perhaps never went away: Which begs the question: How does an organisation plot a course for its portal?

A portal ought to be created with a business objective, not because it’s fashionable, or competitors have one, or it’s possible with a large amount of content that is underutilised elsewhere in the organisation. From inception the portal should be planned to provide value to users, and in this context focusing on their requirements will produce a portal users keep using.


Register to read more...


Conclusion: The emphasis on marketing eGovernment has dropped in priority. There was a Community of Practice on Marketing E-government run by Australian Government Information Management Office (AGIMO) but that government-only group is no longer meeting. In addition there is no specific area in AGIMO responsible for marketing e-government, yet marketing activity is critical to building usage, adoption and education of a product or service.

As the government is committed to delivering services on the Web, it should, as a business would, create the necessary structures for professionals to market the services. To ignore marketing wastes investments in the websites. Currently, the so-called 'operational' areas have some marketing inbuilt into their projects but there is no overall responsibility to oversee standards and market online services.

In addition a complete review of all government website usability should be undertaken to assess weaknesses and client usage. Such a review may entail revising sites. Thirdly the definition and application of “access’’ through the sites ought to be clarified: is it published information; transaction for payment, or email contact with government officers. The fulfilment of any one of these actions should be measured to report if the objective of access has been successful.


Register to read more...


Conclusion:Government websites are not reaching the public as effectively as they might. This phenomenon is common around the world and while some sites have functional value to the public, research shows that people are confused, ignorant or unable to find what they need from many government sites.

To improve their usability government should examine practical steps to reach citizens, firstly by marketing the sites in conjunction with improved navigation and, if required, re-designing sites for users to know what they can find on them.

Secondly, refine the execution of the sites, with special reference to improving the quality of sophisticated interaction that is possible between citizens and the administration. This process of should be conducted in the context of the strategic objectives of e-government policy if they are to achieve that particular policy target.


Register to read more...


Conclusion:A prerequisite of a business case is that all the variables are covered; the forecasts of likely outcomes along with the returns on investment and the processes to manage the venture are classified and described. In so doing, risk is averted or minimised, although there may be occasions when a proposed venture is so large a degree of faith in a business forecast is just as influential as the logic or rationale contained in the business case.

As News Corporation emerged became the third largest digital media player in the US in 2005, its approach to managing online strategic investments offer an interesting insight into its strategic direction. For instance the corporation is now committed to digital media to produce a new growth channel as its newspaper businesses suffer decline.

Few mangers will face the scale of what News has done but two useful messages emerge. Firstly, catching up with the early movers is prudent because the risks associated with catching up with them decrease over time. Secondly, management needs to take steps to ensure that a new initiative works across the entire organisation, that is, it produces benefits for most operating divisions. In the case of News, to take a military analogy: they have boosted their right flank and hoped the left can survive – for the time being.


Register to read more...


Conclusion: A website that is underperforming, certainly in terms of the expectations that an organisation may have had for it, could be called loss-making. Not all websites generate revenue in one way or another but many organisations want their sites to demonstrate returns, whether that is in contact with site users, public relations, or just awareness of the site itself.

There are many tools and techniques to measure, and thereby improve the performance of a site: one of these is usability. These techniques will deal with the execution of site structure and content. As valuable as these techniques may be, if a site is loss making it may be that the root cause lies in the initial planning i.e. that the site does not match the strategy or the expectations that were in place when it was developed.

Organisations with underperforming web site must adopt business process re-engineering principles and redesign it and redesign the aims of the site. Return to the strategic plan – if one exists – and reset objectives. Do this planning once the site has been measured and assessed to obtain a thorough overview of the site’s current performance.


Register to read more...


Conclusion:The mobile phone is entering a new phase in which it appears likely to become another medium, combining material from broadcast and print media. The mobile is not likely to become a pocket cinema - Apple’s iPod video is that – but according to a recent Australian research survey mobile users want more communication choices on their mobiles and to enjoy media content.

Current developments in technology and the growth of mobile content and increasingly mobile media content give organisations a powerful channel option in their communications suite.


Register to read more...


In the News

How Do You Choose The Best Application Environment For Your Business? - WHICH-50 - 8th October 2019

According to a new IBRS study, spend on enterprise solutions is set to increase in 2019-2020. Both IT and line of business buyers need to consider how they manage procurement of these new solutions...
Read More...

The pros and cons of shadow IT In today’s business world - WHICH-50 - 23 July 2019

Shadow IT sounds like a covert — quite possibly dark — force. And to some people it may well be. But the truth is both far simpler and more complex. According to Cisco, Shadow IT is the use of...
Read More...

Busting The Three Big Cloud Myths - WHICH-50 - 11 June 2019

Organisations that are resisting the shift to cloud computing are often basing their decisions on common misconceptions around security, price and integration. That’s a key finding in a recent...
Read More...

ANZ business users calling the shots in ICT decisions

Conducted by Australia’s Intelligent Business Research Services (IBRS) and commissioned by TechnologyOne, the survey of 261 business leaders in ANZ has shown that business functions are having more...
Read More...

Managed security: a big gamble for Aussie IT providers - CRN - 02 August 2018

TechSci Research estimates the Australian managed security services (MSS) market will grow at a CAGR of more than 15 percent from 2018-23 as a result of the increased uptake of cloud computing and...
Read More...

Subscribe to IBRS Updates

Invalid Input
Invalid Input
Please enter a valid email address
Please enter your mobile phone number
Invalid Input

Get in-context advice from our experts about your most pressing issues or areas of interest

Make an Inquiry

Sitemap