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Conclusion: The instincts of greed and ambition can sometime blindside the architects of IT Shared Services (ITSS) initiatives. Thinking too grandiosely and without sufficient regard for the consequences of ITSS can doom such ventures from the outset. Conversely, taking more level-headed approaches, tempered by the honest counsel of those that aren’t necessarily management sycophants, can have the opposite effect.

Conclusion: The seemingly growing deployment of enterprise social media may add another layer to organisational communications and collaborative suites; or it may replace them altogether. At this stage definite judgement is not possible, given the varying feedback on usage, value and overall benefits.

Ostensibly these tools are being introduced to improve collaboration and productivity. Yet the evidence is not conclusive on those criteria. Nevertheless, it is not necessary to rationalise such deployments on efficacy criteria alone.

Conclusion: There is a perception that public sector organisations experience higher failure rates with IT Shared Services (ITSS) ventures than their private sector counterparts. While no definitive studies have confirmed this, it remains true that both sectors have a chequered history of success with ITSS. However, perceptions are skewed by the sometimes massive and very public ITSS failures that have occurred locally in the public sector. Curiously, many of these failures could have been averted by following some simple steps.

Conclusion: Crafting a durable social media strategy is a challenge. How social media tools and behaviour will mature, and the lessons taken from the early phase, will define how it will be implemented later. To manage the social evolution, adequate guidelines can serve as a strategic path.

The two key elements to have in creating a social media strategy are: 1) a robust view of how users and user behaviour is evolving and 2) practical and tactical techniques and tools to deploy and measure in order to produce the information to grow competence.

Conclusion: Just as the influx of personally owned mobile devices is reaching a peak in enterprises, there are new options for mobile device management (MDM) which are being driven by three factors. The three factors are: HTML5, Exchange ActiveSync, and carriers moving up the value chain in an IP-centric world. Ultimately, all three options will have appeal to different types of organisations, and different applications. Due to the rate of maturation of these factors, CIOs should expect that an MDM platform deployment will have a shelf life of less than two years.

Conclusion: The IPv6 day in June attracted significant media attention and raised the profile of IPv6 again. As is typical, the media latched on to the “bad news” and ran headlines stating that the Internet is running out of addresses! While this is correct, most ANZ organisations will not experience any significant impact and the burden of supporting IPv6 will largely fall to the telecommunications vendors, or other organisations that run large public networks.

IT executives need to check that their organisation has a strategy for dealing with IPv6, largely at their gateways systems, and ensure that this strategy does not get blown out of proportion.

Conclusion: For outsourced IT or business processes, innovation that is measurable and practical must be managed and aligned with your outsourcing provider. The further up the business value chain you engage in offshoring and outsourcing, the more critical this development and integration of innovation becomes. Unfortunately in practice this has proven more difficult. As a result, innovation in outsourcing contracts has been lacking. This lack of success has led to questions around the actual potential for outsourcing to provide innovation. of the actual capability for outsourcing and innovation.

Conclusion: Recent events1 have shown that IT shared services initiatives do not always live up to their promises. When benefits fail to materialise, emotional rather than logical thinking predominates. Naysayers engage in the fallacy of faulty generalisation, asserting that if one IT shared services venture is deemed to have failed, then the very notion of IT shared services is questionable.

Conclusion: Investment in meeting room management systems is becoming increasingly important for organisations looking to modernise and optimise their facilities. It is however a complex investment. The investment will fail if appropriate stakeholders’ perspectives are not included in the process and if an objective analysis of user requirements fails to occur. When executed correctly, the definition of a meeting room can be expanded, ensuring efficient use of assets such as car parks, lockers and technology.

Conclusion: With most organisations now completely dependent on IT systems for their day-to-day operations, and ongoing viability, ensuring the availability and recoverability of these systems is one of the IT organisation’s most important responsibilities. However, like many other forms of insurance, disaster recovery planning is not seen to be urgent by IT or the business, and often fails to meet the requirements of the business.

IT executives need to look for the early warning signs that their disaster recovery plan is compromised, and if found, take action to defuse this ticking time-bomb that could blow up their career.

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