Operations & Service Delivery

Conclusion: Crafting a durable social media strategy is a challenge. How social media tools and behaviour will mature, and the lessons taken from the early phase, will define how it will be implemented later. To manage the social evolution, adequate guidelines can serve as a strategic path.

The two key elements to have in creating a social media strategy are: 1) a robust view of how users and user behaviour is evolving and 2) practical and tactical techniques and tools to deploy and measure in order to produce the information to grow competence.

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Conclusion: Just as the influx of personally owned mobile devices is reaching a peak in enterprises, there are new options for mobile device management (MDM) which are being driven by three factors. The three factors are: HTML5, Exchange ActiveSync, and carriers moving up the value chain in an IP-centric world. Ultimately, all three options will have appeal to different types of organisations, and different applications. Due to the rate of maturation of these factors, CIOs should expect that an MDM platform deployment will have a shelf life of less than two years.

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Conclusion: The IPv6 day in June attracted significant media attention and raised the profile of IPv6 again. As is typical, the media latched on to the “bad news” and ran headlines stating that the Internet is running out of addresses! While this is correct, most ANZ organisations will not experience any significant impact and the burden of supporting IPv6 will largely fall to the telecommunications vendors, or other organisations that run large public networks.

IT executives need to check that their organisation has a strategy for dealing with IPv6, largely at their gateways systems, and ensure that this strategy does not get blown out of proportion.

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Conclusion: For outsourced IT or business processes, innovation that is measurable and practical must be managed and aligned with your outsourcing provider. The further up the business value chain you engage in offshoring and outsourcing, the more critical this development and integration of innovation becomes. Unfortunately in practice this has proven more difficult. As a result, innovation in outsourcing contracts has been lacking. This lack of success has led to questions around the actual potential for outsourcing to provide innovation. of the actual capability for outsourcing and innovation.

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Conclusion: Recent events1 have shown that IT shared services initiatives do not always live up to their promises. When benefits fail to materialise, emotional rather than logical thinking predominates. Naysayers engage in the fallacy of faulty generalisation, asserting that if one IT shared services venture is deemed to have failed, then the very notion of IT shared services is questionable.

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Conclusion: Investment in meeting room management systems is becoming increasingly important for organisations looking to modernise and optimise their facilities. It is however a complex investment. The investment will fail if appropriate stakeholders’ perspectives are not included in the process and if an objective analysis of user requirements fails to occur. When executed correctly, the definition of a meeting room can be expanded, ensuring efficient use of assets such as car parks, lockers and technology.

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Conclusion: With most organisations now completely dependent on IT systems for their day-to-day operations, and ongoing viability, ensuring the availability and recoverability of these systems is one of the IT organisation’s most important responsibilities. However, like many other forms of insurance, disaster recovery planning is not seen to be urgent by IT or the business, and often fails to meet the requirements of the business.

IT executives need to look for the early warning signs that their disaster recovery plan is compromised, and if found, take action to defuse this ticking time-bomb that could blow up their career.

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Conclusion: RFTs (Requests for Tender) increasingly contain NFRs (Non Functional Requirements) describing the desired attributes of the systems solution or services being sought. Attributes sought vary from those directly related to products and services such as scalability and high availability to strategic management capabilities.

NFRs are needed to help differentiate tenderers due to the commoditisation of products and services. Astute tenderers know they have to submit a compelling value proposition complemented by initiatives to convince clients they can deliver what is required. Clients likewise need to define fine achievable NFRS, be discerning assessors of responses, and be able to hold the tenderers accountable.

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Successful IT architecture is largely about choosing the optimum systems and technologies that enable organisations to achieve their strategic objectives. The right way to choose between architecture options is through an open, timely, visible process that incorporates key stakeholder input, is based on credible evidence and is measured against alignment with organisational needs and priorities. Poor architecture decision making leads to confusion, waste and delay.

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Conclusion: Demand for storage capacity continues to grow at 60%+ per annum, requiring ongoing capital investments in incremental capacity upgrades, or worse, a capital intensive rip and replace upgrade every 3-4 years. Since “cloud” is the current IT buzzword, IT organisations are being asked to look at how the use of cloud storage can reduce cost and transform lumpy capital expenditure into a more uniform “pay as you go” operational cost.

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