Peter Grant

Peter Grant

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Conclusion: When architecting a payroll environment it is best to align to employment types not to departments. The payrolls are simpler to establish and run, cost less, and are in a form that can be outsourced to specialist payroll BPaaS providers.


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Conclusion: Failure to understand the nuances present in clinical environments can lead to experienced ICT professionals making fundamental errors. These errors can impact patient safety.


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Related Articles:

"Why Health ICT is failing Patients" IBRS, 2014-10-31 18:11:44

Conclusion: Over the years, many ICT professionals have moved from roles in commerce to roles in Health without recognising the unique challenges presented by clinical environments. The result is an underperforming, expensive and misaligned ICT service that soaks up hundreds of millions of dollars annually for minimal patient benefit.


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Related Articles:

"Why Health ICT is failing Patients (Part 2)" IBRS, 2014-12-03 16:44:03

Conclusion: In most vendor-client relationships power shifts from the client to the vendor as soon as the deal is signed. As the SMACC (Social, Mobile, Analytics, Cloud and Consumerisation) ecosystem evolves, strategies are emerging that enable power to remain with the client for the duration of the vendor-client relationship. However, this shift in power will only happen if the client actively works to eliminate vendor lock-in strategies.


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Conclusion: Failure to embrace the SMACC stack (Social, Mobile, Analytics, Cloud and Consumerisation) will result in the wider organisation working around the internal ICT provider. Job losses in the ICT team and a reduction in wider corporate capability will result.


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Conclusion: When it comes to balancing the demands of stakeholders, CIOs are often left with Hobson’s choice1 – give in to demands from their enterprise customers. The alternative (saying no) risks the CIO being labelled a ‘Blocker’.

Elite CIOs deal with individual stakeholder demands within an ecosystem of five distinct stakeholder forces, and in doing so drive extraordinary enterprise benefits. Less effective CIOs remain bogged down in a tactical debate focusing on one demand at a time – never really satisfying anyone.

Success as a CIO will be defined by how well an agreed balance by these five stake-holder forces will be achieved.


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Conclusion: Much of the work undertaken by IT Departments (systems development, maintenance, systems upgrades, selection of new technologies, etc) could well be managed under a project framework. Instead many organisations choose to manage this work using permanent teams under a hierarchical structure. This is serious mistake that inevitably drives higher than necessary IT costs.


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Over the last few years I have grown to learn that there is this thing called ‘Real Work’. I haven’t been able to identify what ‘Real Work’ is but I can tell you this, ‘Real Work’ must be very very important.


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Conclusion: Amazingly some senior business executives still proudly state, ‘I don't understand anything about information technology'. One can see how an executive might have thought this way in the 1970s but now some 30 years later and with ICT fundamental to day to day operations of every organisation such a view is just simply unacceptable.

In today's environment senior ICT executives should take every opportunity to make the CEO and board members aware of the business opportunities and risks associated with effective ICT investments. CIO's should also make sure ICT governance processes involve senior business executives in strategic not operational decision making.

CIO's need to encourage their CEO and other members of the Executive to start saying ‘I need to understand the impacts of information technology on our business'.


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Conclusion: IT executives are often held accountable for the non-delivery of business benefits when in most cases they are not in a position to ensure the appropriate business process and behavioural changes are made to realise the benefits. To avoid being blamed for someone else’s non-delivery IT executives need to have the governance owners in their organisations introduce a benefits management regime. One useful approach was developed by Cranfield University in the late 1990s.


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Conclusion: Organisations should not use old style systems development methodologies when implementing off-the-shelf packages. Package implementations need to tailor business processes to meet the operational characteristics of the selected package. Old style systems development methodologies assume a green field approach where the objective is to tailor the system to meet exact business requirements.

Heavily tailoring an off-the-shelf package will significantly increase ownership costs (by up to 10 times), while reducing the organisation’s ability to adopt future offerings that have been designed to work with the standard package.

Implementing a new package creates an opportunity to improve the way the organisation operates. Trying to fit a new package into old ways of working is an expensive exercise that invariably fails to take advantage of new business opportunities.

Business professionals must be involved in redesigning / changing business processes. As obvious as this sounds it is not hard to find example after example where it isn’t done.


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Conclusion: Too often project managers embark on programs of work without sufficient analysis on whether the organisation has the capability or capacity to implement the initiatives. When initiatives inevitably run late most internal observers cite poor project management as the cause of the problem.

Some programs cannot be implemented on time no matter how well they are project managed. These programs go wrong at the planning stage when people fail to identify the work that needs to be done before the proposed project can actually begin.

To avoid inevitable project management failures strategic planners must firstly determine what can actually be achieved in year 1, year 2 and year 3 of the ICT strategic plan. When implementation constraints are known planners can develop a base program of work that is achievable. Once this is done planners should then fine tune the priority of each initiative based on its contribution to business value.


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Conclusion: Recently I was at a Christmas party with several 30 year IT Veterans. As usual a few war stories were shared. This paper contains two of the more bizarre stories. Unfortunately neither of these stories would exist if a formal peer review process had been in place in the organisations concerned.

IT departments should have some form of peer review for all initiatives and this should include operations, systems development, purchasing, communications, etc. Failure to implement a peer review process may result in your actions being recounted in war stories some time in the future.


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Conclusion: Cross-agency initiatives are high-risk endeavours that can deliver significant community and financial benefits. They are extremely challenging because they require a coordinated approach across Agencies as well as high levels of business and technical capability.

Failure to establish high Capability Maturity Level (CMM) processes and to acquire / develop key skills is a major reason why managers involved in many cross-agency initiatives encounter problems.

Before work on an initiative begins program directors should review the capability of each participating Agency in the areas of: project management; risk management; financial management; strategic planning; and, benefits management. If the capability of participating Agencies is not up to the level required, then a capability development program must be undertaken before major work can begin.


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