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Peter Hall

Peter Hall was an IBRS advisor between 2016 and 2020 who covered enterprise infrastructure, management, managing vendor and customer relationships, vendor capabilities and vendor offerings. Peter is experienced in Start-Up’s and Mergers and Acquisitions. Peter had over 37 years of experience working in the IT sector in ANZ and Asia Pacific, gaining invaluable insights into vendor offerings and strategies, relationship management, and channel strategies. Peter’s an experienced executive having worked for Hewlett-Packard, Blade Network Technologies (acquired by IBM in 2010), IBM and Lenovo. Peter is also an accredited Tony Buzan Licensed Instructor in Mind Mapping.

Conclusion: Strategic thinking, planning and problem solving often involve bringing together a team of knowledgeable contributors who need to analyse, debate, discuss and decide on key issues around the topic they are trying to address. Mind mapping can be a powerful technique for helping to stimulate the ideas, plan actions, and even communicate the output of the thinking.


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Related Articles:

"Digital transformation: More than a technology project" IBRS, 2018-06-01 04:04:24

"Mind Mapping Practitioners Course" IBRS, 2018-03-04 05:45:02

"Mind mapping at work Part 1: Core business skills" IBRS, 2018-07-05 03:15:19

"Mind mapping software: Going beyond pen and paper" IBRS, 2017-11-02 04:20:45

Conclusion: Mind mapping is a tool that facilitates “whole-brain” thinking. It is a technique that can be applied to all forms of the thought process, particularly to memory, creativity and learning. Within an organisation, the use of mind mapping as a visual and graphic thinking tool can help improve business processes and practices, solve problems, improve decision making, rethink strategies, set goals or simply improve the day-to-day efficiency of working within the organisation.

By encouraging and training individuals and teams within organisations to utilise mind mapping, organisations can benefit by improving thinking processes and developing daily habits that improve productivity and outcomes.


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Related Articles:

"Mind Mapping Practitioners Course" IBRS, 2018-03-04 05:45:02

"Mind mapping as a tool for collaboration" IBRS, 2017-10-02 22:48:29

"Mind mapping software: Going beyond pen and paper" IBRS, 2017-11-02 04:20:45

Conclusion: A requirement of the European Union’s (EU) General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) is the concept of “data portability”, which provides a right to receive personal data an individual has provided in a “structured, commonly used, machine-readable format”, and to transmit that data to another organisation.

Underlying data portability is an assumption that data standards exist and are widely used across all public and private sector organisations, especially in specific vertical industries, such as Financial Services, Health or Utilities. In many cases in Australia, no such standards exist and there is no framework to encourage industry cooperation.

Australian organisations needing to comply with GDPR will have to develop an approach and strategy to how they will provide data portability when requested to do so.


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Related Articles:

"GDPR potentially benefiting organisations" IBRS, 2018-02-01 10:19:45

"GDPR – A European standard impacting Australian organisations" IBRS, 2017-04-04 03:01:53

"GDPR: Who needs a Data Protection Officer?" IBRS, 2017-09-02 02:16:34

"Understanding GDPR requirements – Part 3" IBRS, 2018-05-04 18:57:12

"Understanding GDPR requirements: Part 2" IBRS, 2018-03-31 07:03:46

"Understanding General Data Protection Regulation requirements Part 1" IBRS, 2018-03-06 06:57:37

Conclusion: The forthcoming General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) legislation is being introduced by the European Union (EU), which has ramifications to organisations worldwide.

Key aspects of GDPR relate specifically to what data exactly an organisation should be able to legally keep and for how long. The underlying principle is that less is best in terms of data collected and kept. For the data to have been legally collected, an individual has to have explicitly given their consent to the organisation to collect, keep and process their personal data.


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Related Articles:

"GDPR potentially benefiting organisations" IBRS, 2018-02-01 10:19:45

"GDPR – A European standard impacting Australian organisations" IBRS, 2017-04-04 03:01:53

"GDPR: Who needs a Data Protection Officer?" IBRS, 2017-09-02 02:16:34

"Understanding GDPR requirements Part 4: Data portability" IBRS, 2018-06-01 04:21:44

"Understanding GDPR requirements: Part 2" IBRS, 2018-03-31 07:03:46

"Understanding General Data Protection Regulation requirements Part 1" IBRS, 2018-03-06 06:57:37

Conclusion: The General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) legislation being introduced by the European Union (EU) in May has ramifications to organisations worldwide.

Australian organisations that have already invested in ensuring that they comply with the Australian Privacy Act 1988, and have a robust privacy management framework in place, may find that they already comply with aspects of the EU’s GDPR. However, GDPR does have more stringent requirements including requirements that are not within the Australian requirements, so effort and investment will be required by organisations that need to comply with GDPR.

When considering an organisation’s position and defensibility in terms of whether they complied or not, organisations will need to develop an understanding of the specific requirements, and how exactly they have implemented “technical and organisational measures to show that they have considered and integrated data protection into their processing activities”1.


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Related Articles:

"GDPR potentially benefiting organisations" IBRS, 2018-02-01 10:19:45

"GDPR – A European standard impacting Australian organisations" IBRS, 2017-04-04 03:01:53

"GDPR: Who needs a Data Protection Officer?" IBRS, 2017-09-02 02:16:34

"Understanding GDPR requirements Part 4: Data portability" IBRS, 2018-06-01 04:21:44

"Understanding GDPR requirements – Part 3" IBRS, 2018-05-04 18:57:12

"Understanding General Data Protection Regulation requirements Part 1" IBRS, 2018-03-06 06:57:37

Conclusion: The forthcoming General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) is new legislation being introduced by the European Union, which does have ramifications for organisations worldwide.

Being new, there is still a lot to be learned about what exactly some of the specific requirements will mean in practice and how they will impact organisations in being able to show that they have understood and completely complied with the regulation.

When considering an organisation’s position and defensibility in terms of did they comply or not, organisations will need to develop an understanding on the specific requirements, and how exactly they have implemented “technical and organisational measures to show that they have considered and integrated data protection into their processing activities”1.


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Related Articles:

"Understanding GDPR requirements Part 4: Data portability" IBRS, 2018-06-01 04:21:44

"Understanding GDPR requirements – Part 3" IBRS, 2018-05-04 18:57:12

"Understanding GDPR requirements: Part 2" IBRS, 2018-03-31 07:03:46

Many organisations are wanting to drive innovation, encourage creative thinking skills and boost productivity. Mind
Mapping is a proven technique that helps individuals and teams improve their creative thinking skills.
 
This course will help you understand Mind Mapping Skills and how to apply them for work purposes. 

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Conclusion: Achieving the ability to comply with the new European General Data Protection Regulation is seen as a costly and burdensome overhead adding a new layer of complexity to how organisations will need to manage and secure Personally Identifiable Information (PII) records kept by them.

However, organisations should view the potential benefits of being able to use obtaining and maintaining the ability to comply with GDPR as an opportunity to justify investments in technologies, process improvements and people to deliver better overall outcomes for the organisation.

Rather than simply focusing on doing what is required to be able to comply, focus should be on using the opportunity to update tools and processes to improve organisational efficiencies, reduce costs, increase customer and employee loyalty, and improve productivity.


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Related Articles:

"GDPR – A European standard impacting Australian organisations" IBRS, 2017-04-04 03:01:53

"GDPR: Who needs a Data Protection Officer?" IBRS, 2017-09-02 02:16:34

"Understanding GDPR requirements Part 4: Data portability" IBRS, 2018-06-01 04:21:44

"Understanding GDPR requirements – Part 3" IBRS, 2018-05-04 18:57:12

"Understanding GDPR requirements: Part 2" IBRS, 2018-03-31 07:03:46

"Understanding General Data Protection Regulation requirements Part 1" IBRS, 2018-03-06 06:57:37

Conclusion: Organisations know that they have legal obligations in terms of record retention and privacy. The foundation of good information management governance is an effective record retention schedule (RRS). Organisations need to regularly review and audit their RRS not only in terms of it being current, but also in terms of it being effective and being complied with.

An effective schedule is one that is being complied with, is easy to understand, meets all legal and regulatory requirements and allows for effective record discovery or e-discovery if required.

Effective management of records is an organisational issue, not an IT issue. IT makes a contribution in provisioning solutions to assist in the management of digital records or helping convert non-digital records into digital records as appropriate. IT also needs to determine the best practices for managing data based on its value rather than its volume.1


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Conclusion: Managing large IT environments and provisioning IT services within an organisation is complex and complexity will always exist. However, not all complexity is “bad”. “Good” complexity is the complexity required to simplify, to reduce costs, create value, improve security and improve overall operations and results.

Focus needs to always be maintained on reducing “bad” complexity. “Bad” complexity is the complexity that makes it difficult to do things, difficult to secure, difficult to manage, difficult to innovate, or difficult to adapt to changes in the organisation. “Bad” complexity comes with high costs, including hidden costs in lost employee productivity and morale, potentially loss of new business opportunities, or higher staffing costs due to the limited availability of the skills needed.

Organisations need to maintain a mindset of constantly managing initiatives to drive towards simplification in their IT portfolio, understanding that achieving this will involve sophisticated and often complex planning and the successful execution of those plans.


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In the News

New cyber security rules reset $8b cloud marketplace - Financial Review - 26 July 2020

Philip Nesci, IBRS adviser and former CIO, has warned that agencies will need to get their information management sorted out to capitalise on the new rules. ‘‘Agencies need to identify their...
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Australia can build a culture of employee-led innovation - DropEverything - 24 July 2020

IBRS advisor Dr. Joseph Sweeney discusses why it falls to individuals to look at improving their work in a post-COVID world. Dr. Sweeney comments on the need to build a culture of innovation that...
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Outdated work from home policies bog down Aussie businesses - Computer Reseller News - 6 April 2020

IBRS analyst Dr. Joseph Sweeney provides best practice-advice on working from home in the current pandemic situation. Dr. Joseph Sweeney discusses current working from home policies which are...
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Centrelink crashes under demand for crisis payments - Australian Financial Review - 23 march 2020

IBRS workforce transformation advisor Joseph Sweeney said many government departments had to navigate difficult IT environments that were only part-way through their digital transformations, with...
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Inside EY's security work at ANZ - Australian Financial Review - 3 March 2020

"There is more security work to go round than there are resources. So I don't think the market is that crowded. It's important to remember that security is not something you buy and then it's done;...
Read More...

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