Nintex

The Latest

7 June 2022: Nintex added more than 50 new pre-built process maps, automation templates, workflows, and connectors to its Nintex Gallery that are designed to accelerate the digitisation of workflows across private and public sector organisations. This comes after acquiring online process management library Promapp in 2018, to expand the company’s range of end-to-end automated business templates such as employee onboarding and invoice processing.

Why it’s Important

Since its acquisition of Promapp, Nintex has introduced a wider range of Cloud-based workflow solutions to help various enterprises realise digitalisation and automation much more easily through visual process maps. Customers find value in integrating the templates in a more cost-efficient approach, which encourages teams to find more solutions to streamline and digitise their internal functions within the organisation.

In addition, even with more low-code platforms being leveraged by citizen developers, the process still requires investment in time and effort to digitise all-too-common manual processes. However, the Nintex Gallery evolves such concepts by providing digital processes that can be adopted 'out of the box', customised to meet specific needs, and integrated with different organisational systems according to an organisation’s needs. 

Finally, templated processes are about more than simply speeding up low-code development with cookie-cutter approaches, since they can also be used to obtain 'better practices' (or even just standardised practices) across industries. This is particularly useful in compliance-heavy  sectors, such as local government and healthcare. 

Who’s impacted

  • CEO
  • Procurement teams
  • Managers

What’s Next?

  • When reviewing low-code platforms, consider the availability and applicability of process templates that promote faster compliance and prevent handover risks.
  • Use process templates not only as an opportunity for quick-wins, but also as an avenue to assist with training and change
  • When procuring a digital business process automation solution, pay attention to local support channels and the costs associated with gaining experienced, local implementation partners.

Related IBRS Advisory

  1. Aussie vendor radar: Nintex joins the mainstream business process automation vendor landscape
  2. VENDORiQ: ServiceNow Introduces ServiceNow Impact

The Latest

22 February 2022: Process intelligence and automation company Nintex announced its acquisition of robotic process automation (RPA) developer Kryon. Australian low-code vendor Nintex, plans to improve its intelligent process automation (IPA) features through Kryon’s process discovery technology capabilities and full cycle RPA with artificial intelligence (AI).

As a process management and automation software builder, Nintex offers low-code design platforms for IT teams, operations experts and business analysts. Some of its largest clients in Australia include Naylor Love, Toyota Australia, Arab Bank Australia, RICOH, Auswide Bank, Port Stephens Council in New South Wales, Auto & General Holdings, and Allegis Group who have benefitted from its low-code development tools to help employees, regardless of their programming expertise, create applications that solve unique enterprise challenges.

Why it’s Important

Nintex’s move to acquire Kryon is yet another example of the merging of all low-code tools (i.e., process singularity) and how mid-tier low-code vendors are pushing up the low-code spectrum. This broad ecosystem of solutions, each with unique traits and features that fit specific organisational structures, should have specific modern low-code platforms that match an organisation’s ecosystem to help better streamline operational processes. In addition, constantly ensuring governance features to avoid the chaos that can ensue from unfettered development when acquiring low-code platforms is crucial in the long-term for better return on investment (ROI) whatever low-code solution is selected.

Nintex is also one of the many Australian companies that have exhibited fast-growing performances in the international market recently through acquisitions and mergers. However, as previously noted by IBRS, most local enterprises and the national government have lower regard for smaller Australian vendors making a name abroad. In many cases, smaller local vendors offer better value and generally have positive project outcomes as a result of their vested interest in meeting their clients’ expectations.

Who’s impacted

  • COO, CIO, CTO
  • Business analysts

What’s Next?

IBRS recently conducted a market scan on low-code vendor trends and found out that large vendors will continue acquiring today’s most successful low-code platform companies until 2025. This will help expand their product portfolios to secure a majority of market share. In this regard, when looking at low-code platforms, organisations must consider the greater ecosystem of low-code tools that will meet their long-term needs. For instance, vendors that can offer a more robust platform that caters to internet of things (IoT) solutions can help organisations focus on IoT devices and controllers instead of hardware and software development integrations.

Related IBRS Advisory

  1. Low-Code Mythbusting
  2. Hammering Low-Code into Place Takes Time
  3. Low-Code Platform Feature Checklist
  4. VENDORiQ: What Marketplacer Shows Us About Buying Aussie Tech