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4 January 2022: RingCentral recently announced that it is expanding its telephony solutions through the Message Video Phone™ (MVP™) platform via a ‘bring your own carrier’ (BYOC) offering. The vendor will also enhance its service to enterprise call centre solutions by allowing Microsoft Teams clients in Australia to integrate the RingCentral app for embedded dialler integration, direct routing solution and fax, call-to-web and voicemail capabilities.

Why it’s Important

IBRS has observed a rise in the number of call centres integrating apps such as Microsoft Teams and Zoom in their operations for embedded phone features. In March 2021, MaxContact, a vendor of a Cloud-based call-centre solution, announced it is supporting integration of Microsoft Teams clients. 

The increased interest in integration of popular video collaboration solutions is a direct result of customers’ recent experiences with video calling. The pandemic has raised expectations for digital service delivery and omnichannel experiences.

IBRS predicts that within the next three to five years, video call centres will be common, and supplement existing in-house facilities. This will coincide with the majority of call centres adopting real-time agent solutions to off-load common service requests and free up operators to offer a deeper, hyper-personalised care that will increasingly include video. These companies will also leverage advanced real-time analytics and artificial intelligence that will accurately detect client sentiment and reaction in every digital interaction.

However, while white-glove service is ideal and will be the norm in the coming years, two challenges will arise. First, even if the technology is already available, it is too early to determine which industries will lead the way and what impact it will have on traditional call-centre outsourcing models. For instance, Australian banks have relocated their call centre operations back to Australia to streamline communications and quickly resolve issues firsthand.

Second, will be the value of outsourced call centres, especially in Asia Pacific where millions of business process outsourcing (BPO) workers in the Philippines cater to telecommunication, banking and insurance customers in the United States, Australia, Europe, Canada and Japan. Video calls will require more than just accent training to make it appear that the servicing company is based locally. The entire user experience - including the call centre environment - will need to be ‘localised’ for different markets.

Who’s impacted

  • CIO
  • Development team leads
  • User experience/customer journey teams
  • Customer service teams
  • Call centre teams

What’s Next?

Call centre managers must invest time in exploring new modes of communication with the aim of enhancing customer relationship management (CRM) tools. However, given that it is highly profitable for vendors to take advantage of this trend in the next five years, call centre solution vendors will be looking for ways to differentiate themselves, while also supporting a wide range of common integrations.

Related IBRS Advisory

  1. VENDORiQ: Why is Zoom Pivoting? Do You Need to Be on Top of the Fourth-Wave of Unified Comms?
  2. Better Practice Special Report: Microsoft Teams Governance
  3. VENDORiQ: CommsChoice becomes Australia's first vendor of Contact Centre for Microsoft Teams Direct Routing

The Latest

December 2021: Data centre and colocation service provider NEXTDC announced it will buy 20 per cent (AU$35m of equity) in Infrastructure-as-a-Service (IaaS) provider AUCloud to support the latter's Cloud platform zone expansion in Brisbane, Melbourne and Adelaide. These centres will be operational as early as the fourth quarter of 2022.

Why it’s Important

NEXTDC is a major data centre provider in Australia with strong contracts in the public and private sectors. By buying into AUCloud, the firm is preparing its position for what is expected to be a wave of 're-localisation' of Cloud services, bringing Cloud workloads back from geographically spread environments to smaller, Australian-based sites.

With re-localisation, enterprises can benefit from highly responsive support from regional Cloud providers that do not just ride the trend of introducing solutions based on US or European requirements and enforce it for local enterprises.

Who’s impacted

  • CIO
  • Development team leads

What’s Next?

Organisations must consider the advantages of working with localised Cloud service providers, especially those with a strong reputation in the industry. They have to look into the benefits that it can bring to their platform in terms of service and technology, delivering geographic redundancy while taking advantage of the proximity to their facilities. These localised services can help with latency and meet data security and compliance requirements demanded by some industries.

Related IBRS Advisory

  1. The Industrialised Web Economy - Part 1: Cloud Computing
  2. VENDORiQ: Google Next: Distributed Cloud is More Than Hybrid and Multi-Cloud

Cloud migration is increasingly becoming one of the most important parts of business processes. When migrating to the Cloud, organisations must find a balance between cost, risks and benefits. It is also vital to create an effective roadmap. IBRS lead a webinar with our advisor Mark Unwin, where we discussed a recent Cloud migration case study, Mark further gives an overview of IBRS's Cloud migration roadmap framework and addresses the next steps you need to consider to successfully migrate to the Cloud.

The COVID-19 pandemic has brought a much sharper focus on digital transformation efforts which have been underway in many organisations. This focus has also highlighted not only the opportunities and benefits of digital investments but also the need to accelerate the pace and delivery of outcomes.

Conclusion: The rise in the number of employees working remotely has transitioned security implementations in favour of zero trust architecture to replace traditional, static security perimeters. But while the extensive set of current technologies and processes in a zero trust model are designed to prioritise real-time visibility into every user’s behaviour, no solution is perfect. As such, integrating a combination of security solutions is necessary since no tool or method is enough on its own. By combining technological assets, security teams can create a cohesive strategy that provides real-time intelligence across multiple networks that enables organisations to respond more quickly to internal attacks.

Conclusion: One of the immediate effects of the COVID-19 pandemic was the closure of offices and the move to remote working conditions. Some businesses were able to immediately execute this as part of their business continuity plan (BCP). Now that the crisis has become the business-as-usual state, challenges have also begun to appear and BCPs need revising to adapt to this new situation.

The employer’s ability to provide the right set of tools goes back to technology and infrastructure investments made prior to the crisis. With a huge percentage of the population online, not just businesses but also schools, government agencies, and communities, there may be a need to update systems and invest in more infrastructure. However, it will not be as easy as purchasing products. It requires understanding workforce behaviour, emerging needs, and trends. As with any change, it will be crucial to maintain organisational culture and connection.