Identity & Access Control

IBRSiQ is a database of Client inquiries and is designed to get you talking to our advisors about these topics in the context of your organisation in order to provide tailored advice for your needs.

The Latest

11 May 2021: Jamf is a market leader in Apple iOS device management, with a strong presence in education. It has announced its intention to acquire the zero-trust end-point security vendor Wandera. 

Why it’s Important

Vendors in the device management have two options for continued growth: add new services and grow horizontally within their market (as in VMWare), or specialise in increasingly niche areas. Jamf has remained firmly entrenched in providing Apple device management, so it is a niche (though important) player in device management. Its acquisition of Wandera, hot on the heels of its purchase of Mondad, will broaden its base and help cement its position against the broader players. 

Who’s impacted

  • End user computing/digital workspace teams
  • Security teams

What’s Next?

Globally, the move to working from home saw an uplift in Apple products being connected to enterprise (work) environments. Citing IDC, Jamf reports the penetration of macOS in 2019 was around 17%, and during 2020 this increased to 23%. In addition, globally 49% of smartphones connecting to work environments remain iOS, though this is slightly lower in Australia, where Android has gained small market share in a tight market last year. 

The challenge with supporting a mixed device ecosystem (Windows, Android, macOS, iOS, Chrome) is now more than just securing the end-point, but the entire information ecosystem. VPNs in particular proved difficult to scale and adapt to a myriad of end points. The need to patch reliability and manage software also becomes significantly difficult due to differing rates of change, patch cycles and tools needed. 

Jamf’s acquisition of Wandera will not eliminate these challenges completely, but will at least simplify the Apple slice of the situation. 

Related IBRS Advisory

  1. Requirements Check-List for Mobile Device Management Solutions
  2. Embracing security evolution with zero trust networking

The Latest

9 March 2021: The Australian Defence Department has inked a deal with Fujitsu, Leido and KBR to blitz its ageing network and end-user computing environment in a program of work thought to be worth around AU$200 million.

Why it’s Important

Fujitsu is not the first vendor that comes to mind when thinking about end-user computing overhauls. However, in the world of highly secure workplaces, vendors such as Fujitsu and Unisys have unique offerings and experiences. Even if not using these vendor’s capabilities, the critical components of the security architecture are worth noting by organisations that need to protect information assets with an increasingly mobile or distributed workforce. 

Who’s impacted

  • End-user computing / digital workspace architects
  • Security teams

What’s Next?

With remote working no longer a choice, but a business continuity issue, organisations need to rethink traditional approaches to securing information assets and people when planning for the next upgrade of end-user computing. Identity management, contextual access control and encryption of information assets are three essential pillars of a modern, secure digital workspace. Building upon these pillars, organisations can look towards zero trust approaches and adopt emerging new techniques for detecting issues and protecting the organisation, such as embodied in products for user, entity and behavioural analytics (UEBA).

Related IBRS Advisory

  1. Architecting identity and access management
  2. Embracing security evolution with zero trust networking
  3. Trends for 2021-2026: No new normal and preparing for the fourth-wave of ICT

Conclusion: Credential theft is still one of the prime means of attacking systems. Dictionaries of passwords are readily available (many with millions of passwords). These allow attackers to perform credential stuffing attacks – often successfully.

Eliminating passwords has been difficult in the past. However, the consensus amongst vendors of both software and hardware is to bring to market methods of achieving authentication without passwords. The ubiquity of mobile devices with touch or facial authentication is one prime element.

This is a necessary evolution of authentication.