Data Analytics

The Latest

29 April 2021: Cloud-based analytics platform vendor Snowflake has received ‘PROTECTED’ status under IRAP (Australian Information Security Registered Assessors Program).  

Why it’s Important

As IBRS has previously reported, Cloud-based analytics has reached a point in cost of operation and sophistication that it should be considered the de facto choice for future investments in reporting and analytics. However, IBRS does call out that there are sensitive data sets that need to be governed and secured to a higher standard. Often, such data sets are the reasons why organisations decide to keep their analytics on-premises, even if the cost analysis does not stack up against IaaS or SaaS solutions.

The irony here is that IT professionals now accept that even without PROTECTED status, Cloud infrastructure provides a higher security benchmark than most organisations on-premises environments.

However, security must not be overlooked in the analytics space. Data lakes and data warehouses are incredibly valuable targets, especially as they can hold private information that is then contextualised with other data sets.

By demonstrating IRAP certification, Snowflake effectively opens the door to working with Australian Government agencies. But it also signals that hyper-scale Cloud-based analytics platforms can not only offer a bigger bang for your buck, but greatly improve an organisation's security stance.

Who’s impacted

  • CDO
  • Data architecture teams
  • Business intelligence/analytics teams
  • CISO
  • Public sector tech strategists

What’s Next?

Review the security certifications and stance of any Cloud-based analytics tools in use, including those embedded with core business systems, and those that have crept into the organisations via shadow IT (we are looking at you, Microsoft PowerBI!). Match these against compliance requirements for the datasets being used and determine if remediation is required.

When planning for an upgraded analytics platform, put security certification front and centre, but also recognise that like any Cloud storage, the most likely security breach will occur from poor configuration or excess permissions.

Related IBRS Advisory

  1. Key lessons from the executive roundtable on data, analytics and business value
  2. VENDORiQ: AWS Accelerates Cloud Analytics with Custom Hardware
  3. IBRSiQ: AIS and Power BI Initiatives
  4. VENDORiQ: Snowflakes New Services Flip The Analytics Model

IBRSiQ is a database of Client inquiries and is designed to get you talking to our advisors about these topics in the context of your organisation in order to provide tailored advice for your needs.

The Latest

09 April 2021: During its advisor business update, Fujitsu discussed its rationale for acquiring Versor, an Australian data and analytics specialist. Versor provides both managed services for data management, reporting and analytics. In addition, it provides consulting services, including data science, to help organisations deploy big data solutions.

Why it’s Important

Versor has 70 data and analytics specialists with strong multi-Cloud knowledge. Fujitsu’s interest in acquiring Versor is primarily tapping Versor’s consulting expertise in Edge Computing, Azure, AWS and Databricks. In addition, Versor’s staff have direct industry experience with some key Australian accounts, including public sector, utilities and retail, which are all target sectors for Fujitsu. Finally, Versor has expanded into Asia and is seeing strong growth. 

So from a Fujitsu perspective, the acquisition is a quick way to bolster its credentials in digital transformation and to open doors to new clients. 

This acquisition clearly demonstrates Fujitsu’s strategy to grow in the ANZ market by increasing investment in consulting and special industry verticals.  

Who’s impacted

  • CIO
  • Development team leads
  • Business analysts

What’s Next?

Given its experienced staff, Versor is expected to lead many of Fujitsu’s digital transformation engagements with prospects and clients. Fujitsu’s well-established ‘innovation design engagements’, are used to explore opportunities with clients and leverage concepts of user-centred design. Adding specialist big data skills to this mix makes for an attractive combination of pre-sales consulting.

Related IBRS Advisory

  1. The new CDO agenda
  2. Workforce transformation: The four operating models of business intelligence
  3. VENDORiQ: Defence Department Targets Fujitsu for Overhaul

Conclusion:

Too often, information communications technology (ICT) and business analytics groups focus on business intelligence and analytics architectures and do not explore the organisational behaviours that are required to take full advantage of such solutions. There is a growing recognition that data literacy (a subset of digital workforce maturity1) is just as important, if not more important, than the solutions being deployed. This is especially true for organisations embracing self-service analytics2.

The trend is to give self-service analytics platforms to management that are making critical business decisions. However, this trend also requires managers to be trained in not just the tools and platforms, but in understanding how to ask meaningful questions, select appropriate data (avoiding bias and cherry-picking), and how to apply the principles of scientific thinking to analysis.

Conclusion: Regardless of its digital strategy, many organisations have not been positioned to properly leverage the digital and data assets that are available to them. A Chief Data Officer (CDO) role can improve this situation by advancing an organisation’s data portfolio, curating and making appropriate data visible and actionable.

The CDO position is appropriate for all larger organisations, and small-to-large organisations focused on data-driven decision-making and innovation. These organisations benefit from a point person overseeing data management, data quality, and data strategy. CDOs are also responsible for developing a culture that supports data analytics and business intelligence, and the process of drawing valuable insights from data. In summary, they are responsible for improving data literacy within the organisation.