Data Security

We all know data is important and its usage is often the difference in highly competitive markets and behind efficient business operations. Regardless of the importance, many organisations struggle to get started using their data holdings, either due to the overwhelming complexity of the environment or the security concerns that come with the data domain and discipline.

Following on from his 'Data Management Maturity Framework' advisory paper, IBRS advisor David Beal conducted a webinar where he shares his approach to the data journey across six data streams:

  • Systems and resources
  • Governance and compliance
  • Master data
  • Data security
  • Data quality
  • Data visualisation and BI

In the webinar, David takes a practical and informative look at data management. Please find below a full video of the webinar. 

Conclusion:

While some bots may be benign, many are engaged in unscrupulous behaviour, such as stealing valuable commercial data or attempting to obtain access illegitimately. At best, bots are a drain on an organisation's resources, increase demands on infrastructure and causing the expenditure of resources, pushing up costs. In the worst case, they represent a significant cyber threat.

IBRS interviewed experts in the field of bot defence: Craig Templeton, CISO and GM Tech Platforms with REA Group and Sam Crowther, developer of the Kasada bot defence platform.

Conclusion: Current network and security deployments make many assumptions about the threat environment and which controls are effective. Many of these assumptions are predicated on an older security architecture that emphasised the perimeter. This perimeter then segregated the outside from the inside with an associated perception that inside was good or trustworthy and outside was bad and untrustworthy.

It is easy to see that for many, if not most organisations, the perimeter is no longer just considered a solid demarcation point between outside and inside. The internal network hosts contractors and consultants as well as integrates external services as if they are native to the network. Staff operate from partner and customer locations as well as from public networks via wi-fi hotspots in cafes, airport lounges and hotels.

This evolution requires a fresh security architecture to assist organisations to operate in the evolving network and service paradigms. The zero trust network (ZTN) philosophy lays out an architectural approach to deploying services, enabling staff and supporting customers. ZTN should be assessed by any organisation looking to move to an internet-driven, Cloud-supported and secure operating schema.