Strategy & Transformation

Flourishing in the modern marketplace relies on an organisation’s ability to make the right choices.

To avoid being left behind in an evolving world it is critical for organisations to jump at opportunities for transformational growth. However, acting without sufficient planning is fraught with risk. 

Transformation can only happen when an organisation is aligned on its strategic intent, and IT leaders need the resources to drive great choice-making across their organisation.

From planning to delivery, IBRS can cut through the confusion and guide your organisation all the way through its transformational journey. Our advisors have first-hand experience delivering digital transformation projects and can develop a tailored roadmap to deliver the outcomes you want. 

Conclusion: On 16 May 2019, IBRS conducted a peer roundtable on issues related to data, analytics and business value. The focus of the roundtable was to allow senior IT executives to explore how different organisations are leveraging data to achieve tangible business benefits.

IBRS conducted the Domo-sponsored event, under the Chatham House rule. Participants included senior IT executives from a broad range of Australian organisations both in the public and private sector.

This paper provides a summary of the key learnings from the event.

Read more ...

Related Articles:

"Data: An Asset and a Liability" IBRS, 2016-12-03 02:41:05

"Machine learning will displace “extract, transform and load” in business intelligence and data integration" IBRS, 2018-02-01 10:03:37

"Prepare to manage the “evolution” of AI-based solutions with “DataOps”" IBRS, 2018-03-31 06:43:42

"Reframing Business Intelligence as Critical Business Imperatives" IBRS, 2015-10-03 00:03:12

Organisations that are resisting the shift to Cloud computing are often basing their decisions on common misconceptions around security, price and integration.

That’s a key finding in a recent report conducted by IBRS, The State of Enterprise Software Report 2019.

The Security Myth

Many of the organisations surveyed declared security as the primary reason for not moving to Cloud services.

Concern over the security of systems — and, critically, of the data they hold — was common in the early days of Cloud computing and it seems at least some of that legacy remains. But it’s a myth.

Dr Joe Sweeney, author of the report said cloud service providers exceed most organisations’ budget and capacity to manage complex cyber security risks.

That’s certainly the view of the Commonwealth Government, which is moving to Cloud-delivered enterprise solutions aggressively.

Full Story

Conclusion: External Cloud services can realise cost reduction up to 50 % p. a. and promise no set-up or exit fees. While the ongoing cost reduction is realistic, there are significant other costs related to third-party services that should be considered to calculate the overall cost saving of Cloud migration. They are:

  • Transition-in cost due to the use of external consulting services to set up the new environment (up to $2.5 million for 7,000 users), as well as procurement cost to prepare tenders, select vendors and negotiate contracts (up to $300,000)
  • Transition-out fees to migrate the current service to another service provider (similar to transition-in cost)
  • Hardware depreciation related to private Cloud exit
  • Governance fees to ensure Cloud consumption remains within budget and the desired service levels are tracked and met (up to 7 % of the annual cost)
  • Risk mitigation strategies to ensure the Cloud service remains secure.

The purpose of this research note is to provide a step-by-step approach to determine the ongoing cost-saving opportunities needed for Cloud migration business case1 preparation.

Read more ...

Conclusion: Many strategic planning activities that are meant to set the future direction for the organisation fail to meet that objective. Current success, a high level of incumbent expertise or even passion can prevent an organisation from considering red flags or other indicators that will impact on future success. At worst, it can result in significant failure; at best, it limits the activities of the organisation to do more of the same with a tactical work plan. Overcoming this myopia is critical to ensuring that strategic planning i.e.fective and provides a useful compass for the organisation.

Read more ...

Conclusion: Business executives in different business units are bypassing ICT with enterprise Software-as-a-Service. Two early leaders in this trend – marketing and human resources departments – are now rediscovering age-old challenges of uncoordinated software selection. CIOs must transform the ICT group to run IT-as-a-Service to help the organisation avoid information and process fragmentation, as well as reposition their teams as consultative partners. There is no time to wait.

Read more ...

Conclusion: New digital services introduce new challenges and opportunities to traditional performance measurement. Start with simple, repeatable metrics and recognise the imperfections in the initial stages of implementation. It is more important to capture data consistently and identify trends than it is to achieve precision. As the new services bed down and the organisation matures digitally, more sophisticated measures will emerge.

Measurement alone will not lead to digital success. Reliable data capture and critical analysis will yield valuable insights. Acting on these insights can lead to further investment in digital programs and be used to fine-tune existing digital services.

Read more ...

Demand for chatbots – automated conversational agents that may be deployed across multiple digital channels, including websites, social media feeds, instant messaging, voice assistants etc. – is growing. As outlined in Chatbots Part 1, organisations should take an evolutional approach to develop an understanding of chatbots, and the skills and capabilities needed to harness them.

Read more ...

Conclusion: The ubiquitous availability of smartphone and wearable technology has opened up opportunities for a wide range of new applications that take advantage of knowing the location and proximity of these devices.

One of the newer underlying technologies that enable these new apps are low-cost small beacons that provide regular transmissions, usually to Bluetooth-enabled devices. When working on digital transformation projects or opportunities to innovate, these technologies should be included in the developer’s tool bag.

Read more ...

Conducted by Australia’s Intelligent Business Research Services (IBRS) and commissioned by TechnologyOne, the survey of 261 business leaders in ANZ has shown that business functions are having more sway about technology decisions and are increasingly opting for Cloud-based applications.

But it is not always a case of “shadow IT” in the traditional sense where a business unit goes behind the technology department’s back to buy a product or service.

Instead, it is “enterprise shadow IT” selected with the blessings of IT, said Joe Sweeney, principal analyst at IBRS, adding that in some organisations, CIOs have transformed and are more supportive and consultative.

Conclusion: Chatbots have become a hot topic among senior executives, especially in HR, customer services, citizen service, marketing and sales groups. Chatbots, powered by the increasingly accurate natural language processing capabilities, hold the potential to radically change the way people interact with an organisation without human intervention.

Separating chatbots into two aspects – clients and engines – provides a basis for very low-cost proof of concepts, while also protecting investments in the most valuable asset of the bot: the training data.

Read more ...

Conclusion: Globally, organisations are dealing with the challenges of “digital transformations” and the need to “innovate”. Chief information officers (CIOs) need to support their organisations in these initiatives, but the ownership in defining what is required rests with the business managers, and the key executives such as the chief marketing officers, chief supply chain officers, chief human resources officers and chief executive officers. If the organisation has one, chief technology officers would be a contributor in terms of how technology can be included in innovation initiatives.

CIOs need to be valued as trusted advisors to the business leaders in terms of what technology solutions will support their businesses’ initiatives.

Read more ...

IBRSiQ is a database of Client inquiries and is designed to get you talking to our Advisors about these topics in the context of your organisation in order to provide tailored advice for your needs.

Read more ...

Conclusion: Media played up the impact of Artificial Intelligence (AI) and Digital Transformation in 2018. However, the potential AI remains underestimated and its limitations misunderstood. In short, AI is reaching peak hype with investments sporadic and confused. In contrast, Digital Transformation remains a primary driver for investment, though it means very different things to different organisations and even different stakeholders within organisations.

Australia’s CIOs remain focused on tactical issues: upgrades of core systems, adoption of hybrid Cloud (as opposed to simply Cloud migration, which was a dominant theme in early 2018) and changing the culture and structure of the ICT group to support “as-a-Service” operational models entity

It is important to note that these tactical priorities of CIOs all have one thing in common: they are aimed at providing a technological infrastructure for the organisation to adopt “Digital Transformation”. In this sense, Digital Transformation is being used as a way to secure agreement and investment in more fluid, responsive and modern tech infrastructure and operations, rather than a specific, measurable business outcome.

In 2019, Digital Transformation is a rallying call, more than a discrete program of work with measurable outcomes. This rallying call will be heard by all stakeholders, but interpreted differently. The challenge for senior ICT executives will be to leverage the short opportunity the Digital Transformation call has to deliver genuine long-term benefits and update infrastructure and operating models to be more flexible and responsive to changing business needs.

Read more ...

Conclusion: There are two broad groups of digital strategies – bold and defensive. Companies that choose bolder strategies tend to be more successful. However, there are good reasons why certain enterprises should consider choosing more conservative defensive digital strategies as there are still benefits to be gained from this approach. Strategy selection depends on a variety of factors, including industry forces and other factors which make each enterprise unique. It is important not to be half-hearted about digital ambition – defensive strategies are not sufficient in the long run. Strong and committed leadership at the top and throughout the organisation is still crucial to the successful implementation of digital initiatives.

Read more ...

Conclusion: Innovation is a growing key competency for organisations in the public sector and seemingly an imperative for the commercial and not-for-profit sectors to grow or maintain market share and relevance in a continuously dynamic marketplace. Although innovation is included in nearly all current strategic plans, both business and technology, organisations still struggle to actually adopt innovation in practice. Only by recognising how not to innovate can organisations ensure that change to their actions and behaviours supports innovation and does not kill it.

Read more ...

Conclusion: The IT organisation in most enterprises suffers from the “Cobbler’s Children” syndrome – they give great advice but do not practise what they preach. A prime example is when IT does not apply Enterprise Architecture approaches and capabilities to the business of IT itself1 and yet expects other departments to apply such principles. Sadly, a new deficiency is emerging in IT as increasingly the role of analytics is democratised across the business – leading to the lack of data analytics capability for IT itself.

As organisations embrace data science, artificial intelligence and machine learning to generate increasingly sophisticated insights for performance improvement, IT must not let itself be left behind. This means ensuring that within a contemporary IT-as-a-Service operating model, space is created for the role of IT Data Analyst. This should be an inward-facing function with primary responsibility for the generation and curation of the IT organisation’s own core information assets in the form of data relating to the portfolio of IT assets, services and initiatives, including curation of operating data from Cloud providers and other partners.

Read more ...

Conclusion: Some ICT strategies are technology-centric while others are business-centric. The technology-centric strategies are usually developed without business stakeholders’ involvement resulting in limited business buy-in. Business-centric strategies are based on business strategies but have a short life-span. This is because market forces require business strategies to change frequently. IBRS recommends that ICT strategies be derived from business and IT guiding principles.
The rationale is that guiding principles have a longer life-span than business strategies and can deliver the desired outcome such as:

  • leveraging new technology
  • involving business stakeholders in the development process
  • realising business value in a timely and cost-effective manner.

Read more ...

Conclusion: Public Cloud is not the solution to all IT organisations’ technology and services problems. This is because most IT organisations use a portfolio of environments such as legacy systems, in-house and outsourced services, customised IT service management tools and standard applications (e. g. email) that cannot be all retrofitted in a public Cloud architecture without major rework. As a result, hybrid Cloud has become the preferred direction because it allows the multiple environments to co-exist in a cost-effective manner. However, a convincing business case is needed to gain business and IT senior executives’ sponsorship to adopt hybrid Cloud. While Cloud migration benefits and risk mitigation are critical success factors, the deployment-hidden cost is a major contributor to failure. The objectives of this research note are to provide a framework1 to develop the business case and to ensure its cost includes the following:

  • Hybrid Cloud strategy development,
  • Risks identification and mitigation,
  • Go-to-market strategy, providers’ selection and contract negotiation, and
  • Ongoing governance to realise the desired business benefits. This can reach up to 7 % of the yearly cost.

Read more ...

Conclusion: Agility has been introduced into organisations as part of their approach to increase the cadence, or velocity, of design, development and implementation cycles for project delivery. Increased levels of activity and visibility are also integral to many social media solutions and their approach to online presence. However, strategic planning processes evolve slowly and for many organisations this critical business and technology planning activity is lagging behind and no longer supports the business objectives in the digital era. 

Read more ...

Conclusion: Digital transformation is top of the agenda for most companies in 2019. Many organisations have initiated digital transformation programs and are seeing success with small-scale pilots. However, these activities do not easily scale across the enterprise or ecosystem, limiting an organisation’s capacity to fully realise the benefits of their digital transformation investment.

The biggest barrier to scaling is not technology. It is culture. The established culture in a stable and successful organisation is likely to resist disruption. Existing remuneration and recognition frameworks tend to reward existing behaviours. Individuals and groups will resist change if they do not believe the “digital vision”. A clear, compelling narrative is needed.

Effective scaling of digital initiatives must be led with a commitment from the top, intense communication at all levels and a clearly articulated vision of the future. Organisations that recognise this and can source the right capabilities to deliver large-scale digital transformations will have higher success rates than those which do not.

Read more ...

Conclusion: Developing a digital strategy or embarking on a digital transformation program is now a common business narrative. For some organisations it is a process of recasting existing IT strategy and continuing in more or less the same manner. For others it involves initiating a technology project as a way to learn new processes and update platforms and skills. Understanding the business readiness of the organisation is a critical element for any change but is key to digital transformation.

Read more ...

Related Articles:

"Digital transformation – get strategy and people right first" IBRS, 2016-08-03 08:01:16

"Digital transformation: More than a technology project" IBRS, 2018-06-01 04:04:24

"Digital transformation: Top 4 lessons" IBRS, 2018-10-04 13:03:00

Conclusion: While the current artificial intelligence (AI) initiatives are data-driven, there are instances whereby the current data is insufficient to predict the future. For example, answering the following questions might be challenging if the available data is only of a historical nature irrelevant for forecasting purposes:

  • Q1: What will be the effect on sales if the price is increased by 10 % as of the next quarter?
  • Q2: What would have happened to sales had we increased the price by 10 % six months ago?

The purpose of this note is to provide a framework that can be used to derive sales principles to answer the above questions. The same approach can be used to derive other business processes principles such as procurement, customer service and client complaints tracking.

Read more ...

Related Articles:

"Acknowledging the limits of machine learning during AI-enabled transformation" IBRS, 2019-01-06 22:29:52

"Analytics artificial intelligence maturity model" IBRS, 2018-12-03 09:44:43

"Machine learning will displace “extract, transform and load” in business intelligence and data integration" IBRS, 2018-02-01 10:03:37

Conclusion: Increasingly, leaders in the field of AI adoption are calling out the limitations of the current machine learning techniques as they relate to knowledge representation and predictive analysis.

Organisations seeking to adopt machine learning as part of their AI-enabled transformation programs should ensure they fully understand these limitations to avoid unproductive investments driven by hype rather than reality by expanding their definitions of machine learning to include the use of graph networks and social physics solutions.

Read more ...

Related Articles:

"Machine learning will displace “extract, transform and load” in business intelligence and data integration" IBRS, 2018-02-01 10:03:37

"Prepare to manage the “evolution” of AI-based solutions with “DataOps”" IBRS, 2018-03-31 06:43:42

"Preparing for the shift from digital to AI-enabled transformation" IBRS, 2018-06-01 04:10:21

Conclusion: As self-service data analytics and visualisation becomes mainstream – due in no small part to Microsoft’s Power BI strategy – traditional data teams within IT groups need to reconsider traditional business intelligence architectures and plan a migration to a new environment. Underpinning the new architecture must be a sharper focus on tools and practices to support data governance, which is not a strength of Microsoft’s portfolio.

Read more ...

 

Conclusion: Artificial intelligence technologies are available in various places such as robotic process automation (RPA), virtual agents and analytics. The purpose of this paper is to provide an AI maturity model in the analytics space. The proposed maturity model can be applied to any type of industry. It provides a roadmap to help improve business performance in the following areas:

  • Running the business (RTB): Provide executives with sufficient information to make informed decisions about running the business and staying competitive.
  • Growing the business (GTB): Provides information about growing the business in various geographies without changing the current services and products.
  • Transforming the business (TTB): Provides information to develop and release new products and services ahead of competitors.

Read more ...

Conclusion: Digital transformation is happening everywhere. It is being included in organisational strategic plans for government service improvements and in commercial organisations to address market challenges and industry disruptors. Digital transformation efforts include a core group of domains including strategy, innovation, experience, automation and trust and these must be addressed in any digital transformation approach. However, a core element of digital transformation is people and the hardest part of digital transformation is the cultural piece.1 Understanding the people elements of digital transformation and appropriately addressing them can mean the difference between success and failure for organisations.

Read more ...

Related Articles:

"Digital transformation: Top 4 lessons" IBRS, 2018-10-04 13:03:00

"Digital: Use it to garner support for your next initiative, but avoid the risks!" IBRS, 2016-08-03 08:01:14

"Know how to sell ideas and support the digital strategy" IBRS, 2018-08-01 09:46:03

"Who should lead digital transformation?" IBRS, 2018-11-02 11:39:29

Conclusion: There are many strategies to consider as well as challenges to be aware of when migrating from a traditional waterfall development methodology to an agile methodology. Plan and prepare carefully and be patient during this transition and anticipated benefits will be realised.

Read more ...

Related Articles:

"Buying agility" IBRS, 2012-01-30 00:00:00

"SNAPSHOT: Agile services spectrum" IBRS, 2018-05-04 19:10:01

"When the Stars are Aligned use Agile" IBRS, 2016-04-22 23:15:40

"When to use Agile project management" IBRS, 2018-07-05 03:29:21

Conclusion: In IBRS’s 2018 Top Business Technology Trends Priorities Report, we noted that despite significant media attention on blockchain or distributed ledger technology (DLT) in 2017, the primary concerns of Australia’s Chief Information Officers (CIOs) in 2018 remains focused on the more pressing issues of migration to the Cloud, and its impact on IT operations and staffing.

However, ignoring DLT in the long term is no longer an option. After 10 years since the advent of blockchain, real world and production examples are now emerging from market-influencing players in Australia such as the Australian Securities Exchange (ASX) and Commonwealth Bank (CBA). This, combined with significant investment from credible vendors (both old and new), requires that CIOs and their Enterprise Architects review the implications of DLT becoming a mainstream means for secure, immutable data exchange to enable fully automated multi-party workflows.

Read more ...

Related Articles:

"Blockchain Principles and Cases" IBRS, 2016-03-31 23:14:46

"The Top Business Technology Priorities for 2016" IBRS, 2016-02-01 01:10:48

Conclusion: The CIO’s role has changed considerably over the past couple of decades, from “keeping the lights on” and working on cost-saving initiatives (automation) to expanding into embracing new technologies and enablers to transform the organisation. The importance of this has created additional roles like the Chief Digital Officer (CDO) to lead this critical activity.

Read more ...

Related Articles:

"Digital Strategy Part 1: What are the traits of digital leaders?" IBRS, 2018-02-01 10:26:23

"Innovation - The new core competency" IBRS, 2012-06-29 00:00:00

"Inspirational leadership core qualities and behaviours" IBRS, 2017-11-02 04:18:41

Conclusion: Microsoft’s portfolio of business intelligence (BI) products now places the vendor in a market-leading position. Over the next three to five years, IBRS expects Microsoft to continue to strengthen its market position in BI, largely through its ability to expose a large number of users to self-service data visualisation and storytelling via some of Power BI’s features being included in Office 365.

Exploring Microsoft’s strategy for Power BI provides several important issues for consideration.

Read more ...

Related Articles:

"Digital and AI-based transformation requires an evolution in business intelligence architectures" IBRS, 2018-05-04 19:06:41

"Return on Investment in Data and Analytics" IBRS, 2015-10-03 00:12:43

Conclusion: IT organisations wishing to create value should initiate selling processes to define business needs, establish SLAs for mission-critical systems and provide IT solutions to key business issues. This will result in boosting IT staff confidence and managing business lines’ expectations more effectively.

Read more ...

Related Articles:

"Importance of a balanced ICT investment portfolio" IBRS, 2018-09-04 13:42:25

"Running IT-as-a-Service Part 47: IT value creation accelerated approach – phase 1" IBRS, 2018-10-04 13:01:03

Conclusion: Since CRM modernisation will impact many major functional areas of the organisation, developing a communication plan to ensure the strategy is developed and executed in a consistent and well-supported manner will involve many different roles and responsibilities. Gone are the days when the CRM was primarily the domain of sales and the IT departments.

Read more ...

Related Articles:

"CRM modernisation Part 1: Strategy, planning & selection" IBRS, 2018-09-04 05:20:15

"CRM modernisation Part 2A: Creating a public sector stakeholder experience strategy" IBRS, 2018-09-04 06:46:34

"CRM modernisation Part 2B: Creating a customer experience strategy" IBRS, 2018-09-04 06:47:58

Conclusion: Organisations either recognised early that digital transformation was essential to meet the competitive demands of their respective markets or accepted that general community expectations had increased where digital transformation of traditional business operations, processes and services was no longer expected and demanded. Digital transformation became the next big thing in organisations and initiatives were launched in earnest everywhere. While there are always success stories, many more have been less than successful and their stories have some very common themes. To make digital transformation work for the long term it is critical to avoid these mistakes.

Read more ...

Related Articles:

"Agile: The other considerations" IBRS, 2018-03-31 06:46:04

"Digital transformation will fail without capable leaders" IBRS, 2018-09-04 13:40:06

"Digital transformation: More than a technology project" IBRS, 2018-06-01 04:04:24

Conclusion: IT organisations wishing to create value are challenged by long implementation time-scales and inability to change the business perception of IT capability. To address these challenges, IT organisations should adopt an accelerated approach by deploying key processes within a six-month period, to demonstrate service quality and commitment to meet business needs in a rational fashion. Failure to do so will brand IT as a support function, and will make IT desire to earn strategic partner status virtually unachievable.

Read more ...

Related Articles:

"Benefits management: Keeping it real" IBRS, 2018-07-05 03:02:17

"Importance of a balanced ICT investment portfolio" IBRS, 2018-09-04 13:42:25

"SNAPSHOT: Agile services spectrum" IBRS, 2018-05-04 19:10:01

Conclusion: IT organisations revisiting their service contracts as a result of mergers and acquisitions should establish a federated vendor management arrangement. The rationale is to ensure central consistency while retaining local autonomy to address tactical matters. For example, the central consistency demands leveraging the economy of scale to reduce cost, whilst the local autonomy allows the extension of services scope to cover local requirements without the need to change the local vendor management arrangements. However, the local autonomy should be governed by verifiable policies.

Read more ...

Related Articles:

"Delivering IT-as-a-Service requires an Enterprise Architecture for IT" IBRS, 2017-09-02 01:42:22

"Mergers, Acquisitions and Divestitures: What does it mean to your business?" IBRS, 2017-01-01 10:35:33

"Running IT as a Service Part 1: Prerequisite Building Blocks" IBRS, 2014-10-01 18:33:12

"What to do when your vendor gets acquired" IBRS, 2003-07-28 00:00:00

Conclusion: Organisations undertake strategic planning activities on a regular basis, whether it be every three years or a rolling review every 12 months, to establish goals for the following three years. However, a review of many strategic plans and more specifically the resulting programs of work are often developed from the perspective of the project rather than the business benefits being sought. Understanding each investment and plotting that investment within an investment matrix will provide executives with a perspective about the balance of their ICT investment portfolio. Strategic investment goals such as planning an allocation for innovation will support execution of plans and achieving strategic goals.

Read more ...

Related Articles:

"Benefits management: Keeping it real" IBRS, 2018-07-05 03:02:17

"Is your organisation addressing the three dimensions of IT planning?" IBRS, 2017-11-02 04:14:17

"Project review: Active assurance" IBRS, 2018-03-06 07:02:37

"Tips for improving and monitoring ICT project governance" IBRS, 2018-07-05 03:12:50

Conclusion: The availability of modern, Cloud-based, omnichannel-focused stakeholder and customer relationship management (CRM) solutions is disrupting customer expectations. It is not just that new CRM solutions have additional features and modules when compared to more traditional CRM solutions with a history predating social media. The modern CRM paradigm is focused on automation and mass personalisation of customer experiences rather than stakeholder and sales management.

A CRM modernisation effort must, therefore, be based upon a firm understanding of the organisation’s most valuable customer experiences. One way to achieve this understanding is to develop a customer experience strategy.

Note: sister note on this topic for public sector organisations is available.

Read more ...

Related Articles:

"CRM modernisation Part 1: Strategy, planning & selection" IBRS, 2018-09-04 05:20:15

"CRM modernisation Part 2A: Creating a public sector stakeholder experience strategy" IBRS, 2018-09-04 06:46:34

"CRM modernisation Part 3: Roles & responsibilities" IBRS, 2018-10-04 13:09:21

"Design thinking – do not rush the empathy" IBRS, 2016-05-05 03:03:00

"User Centred Design or Design Thinking" IBRS, 2017-07-03 23:24:11

Conclusion: The availability of modern, Cloud-based, omnichannel-focused stakeholder and customer relationship management (CRM) solutions is disrupting expectations of how public sector organisations should interact with their stakeholders, be it citizens and constituents, the business community, research or other agencies.

It is not just that new CRM solutions have additional features and modules when compared to more traditional CRM solution with histories that predate social media. Rather, the emerging modern CRM paradigm is focused on automation and mass personalisation of stakeholder communication rather than sales management.

A public sector’s CRM modernisation effort must, therefore, be based upon a firm understanding of the organisation’s most valuable stakeholder experiences. One way to achieve this understanding is to develop a stakeholder experience strategy.

Note: A sister note on this topic for private sector organisations is available.

Read more ...

Related Articles:

"CRM modernisation Part 1: Strategy, planning & selection" IBRS, 2018-09-04 05:20:15

"CRM modernisation Part 2B: Creating a customer experience strategy" IBRS, 2018-09-04 06:47:58

"CRM modernisation Part 3: Roles & responsibilities" IBRS, 2018-10-04 13:09:21

"Design thinking – do not rush the empathy" IBRS, 2016-05-05 03:03:00

"User Centred Design or Design Thinking" IBRS, 2017-07-03 23:24:11

Conclusion: The potential, and corresponding increased expectations of, modern CRM is causing many organisations to re-evaluate their existing CRM solution (or multiple solutions) with a CRM migration.

The decision to migrate to a new CRM solution should not be taken lightly. Given that the management of contacts (e. g. customers, stakeholders, citizens, etc.) is central to every organisation, changing how an organisation communicates with and serves these contacts must be viewed as a strategic initiative.

Therefore, it is vital that each organisation create a strategy, and subsequent plan, for its modern CRM journey. In this paper, IBRS outlines the typical journey for an organisation creating a strategy, planning for, and finally selecting a next-generation CRM solution.

Read more ...

Conclusion: During the last two decades, service desks delivery had the following shortcomings:

  • The service desk voice communication channel was characterised by a long waiting time to connect with service desk staff.
  • Service desk staff with limited skills minimised the number of issues resolved at the first point of contact.
  • There was a lack of online channels and limited self-service offerings, e.g. password reset.
  • The service charges were based on the number of incidents that discouraged providers to reduce the number of incidents.

To address these shortcomings, IT organisations should transform to Service Desk-as-a-Service. It should be powered by self-service virtual agents that can identify most of the solutions without the need to connect with service desk officers. The charges should be based on the number of users instead of outages to encourage providers to address outages’ root causes. Online services covering reporting on issues and following up progress should be favoured over voice communication.

Read more ...

Related Articles:

"Can IBRS identify what Service Desk software is most prevalent in Australia?" IBRS, 2017-04-30 11:16:50

"Running IT-as-a-Service Part 25: Understanding the cost drivers of Application-as-a-Service" IBRS, 2016-12-03 02:41:03

"Running IT-as-a-Service Part 43: Service level penalties and incentives for hybrid Cloud" IBRS, 2018-07-05 03:11:03