The topic of Big Data has been propelled from the engine room of theWeb 2.0 giants into the mainstream press. Over the last decade, the volume of data that governments and financial institutions collect from citizens has been eclipsed by the data produced by individuals in terms of photos, videos, messages, as well as geolocation data on online social platforms and mobile phones, and also the data produced by large scale networks of sensors that monitor traffic,weather, and industrial systems.

IBRS has always recognised data as the key to value creation, and has built up an extensive body of research on the latest trends and the shift from enterprise data to “big data” that is currently unfolding. This white paper addresses the scale and the businessimplications of this shift.

Register to read more...

With financial and economic commentators warning of difficulttimes ahead, CIOs must be prepared and have arguments at their fingertips to justify continued IT investment in corridor conversations or at the Executive (or Board) when all operating budgets arelikely to be under the microscope.

It might be argued that business managers should present the casefor increased IT investment in their business systems, that is as owners or sponsors. However the reality is an increasing numberof information systems cross organisational boundaries and the CIO is often the only manager able to grasp the ramifications of and need for enterprise-wide investment in IT.

Register to read more...

IBRS, along with many other organisations, has written extensively about “the cloud”. Every organisation selling a product and/or service puts its own spin on what the cloud actually is.

The appeal of cloud computing cannot be denied,and the buzz in the market for the last few years is evidence of the desire of IT organisations to find ways to deliver IT services that are: better,cheaper, more resilient, more secure, and moreuser friendly.

Cloud services are not similar to a highly virtualised internal IT operating environment, although cloud vendors may use virtualisation extensively. Nor are they similar to the tightly controlled experience of time-sharing on a mainframe back in the 1970s, although cloud vendors may price their services in a similar user-pays model. Even though webmail, a form of Software as a Service,has been available to consumers since the 90s, cloud vendors have moved well beyond that simple offering.

While there are excellent and crisp definitions of what the cloud should be, for example the definition provided by the National Institute of Standardsand Technology1 (NIST), what really makes cloud new is how the term itself has become both all encompassing, and yet completely useless at defining the nature of the service!

Register to read more...

The Cloud is a significant long-term trend that should not be ignored.Like the introduction of the PC and Open Systems in the ‘80s/‘90s,an IT organisation can either selectively embrace the Cloud, orfind itself bypassed by the business units who will introduce Cloudbased solutions to suit their needs.

Organisations that do not embrace the cloud risk losing control ofthe IT Architecture, which leads to an overly complex, cost andineffective environment. Even worse, while individual business unitsmay gain some temporary benefits, the overall organisational agilitywill decrease and the alignment of IT to strategy breaks down,creating longer-term problems for the organisation as a whole.

On the other hand, if the Cloud is selectively embraced as yetanother IT sourcing strategy, and if best practice IT managementfunctions are retained and expanded to provide appropriate governance,the Cloud can be a positive agent for change that increasesagility and creates greater transparency in cost.

Register to read more...

Many organisations are seeing growing demandand discussion around mobility and mobile ap-plications, in particular in the Networks Group.In theory, mobility can enable significant businessinnovation and optimisation of business process-es. However, few organisations have been able toclarify the benefits of mobility in terms that arealigned to their organisational goals and visionsstatements. This challenge is exacerbated by therapid innovation and changes underway in themobility market.

What is needed to address these problems is aconsistent, repeatable process that embeds mo-bility into the organisation’s overall IT Strategy.At the same time, mobility needs to be treatedslightly differently to many traditional projectsof work, as most mobility initiatives are smaller,with shorter deliver times, than large system de-ployments, but of often intimately interconnectedwith, and enabled by, the traditional larger backend systems.

To meet this challenge, IBRS developed its Mobil-ity Strategy Methodology, which provides a formalframework and process.

Register to read more...