Mike Mitchelmore

Mike Mitchelmore

Mike Mitchelmore is an IBRS advisor specialising in the areas of ICT strategy, program and project management, ICT service delivery and telecommunications. Mike has more than 40 years of experience in the ICT industry during which he has successfully led engagements in the design and deployment of a global telecommunications networks and IT platforms, negotiated managed telecommunications services, introduced new capabilities for call centres and consolidated ICT systems to focus on service delivery for citizen facing services. Mike has also assisted clients in ICT strategy, support planning, system design and architecture, and procurement strategies. Mike is a graduate of the Australian Army Command and Staff College, and the Royal Military College of Science (UK). He holds a degree in Social Science (human resource development), and graduate diplomas in Management Studies and Telecommunications Systems Management. Mike is a certified PRINCE 2 Practitioner and an ITIL (V2) Manager.

Read latest work...

Connect with Mike

Have a specific question Mike Mitchelmore?

Email

Conclusion: The Agency Head/CEO is responsible to accredit the ICT system for use at the PROTECTED level. The accreditation process is specific to the services being delivered for the organisation. The Australian Signals Directorate (ASD) certification process is a generic process that assesses the Cloud Service Provider’s (CSP) level of security only.

The Agency Head/CEO remains responsible as the Accreditation Authority (AA) to accredit the security readiness for the services to be delivered for their organisation. In practice the CIO/CISO will lead the accreditation process on behalf of the CEO.

ASD’s role as the Certifying Authority (CA) for PROTECTED Cloud services provides the agency/organisation using the CSP with independent assurance that the services offered meet government Information Security Registered Assessors Program (IRAP) requirements and vulnerability assessment requirements at the PROTECTED level. The certification process provides a consistent approach to the cyber risk assessment of the CSP’s environment only. The PROTECTED Cloud certification does not cover security assessment related to the design and maintenance of the customers’ services and/or software to be run on the PROTECTED Cloud platform.

The adoption of a PROTECTED Cloud solution will still require a regular review of the security posture. ASD will conduct regular reviews of their processes as the certifying authority (CA), and the Agency Head/CEO will be required to regularly review the accreditation of the service as a whole.


Read more


Related Articles:

"Running IT-as-a-Service Part 38: Successful hybrid Cloud requires multi-provider governance framework" IBRS, 2018-02-01 10:08:33

"Running IT-as-a-Service Part 49: The case for hybrid Cloud migration" IBRS, 2019-02-03 01:26:59

"Should elements of your IT environments and data holdings be classified PROTECTED? Why and what to consider" IBRS, 2019-01-06 22:27:44

"The value proposition for PROTECTED Cloud" IBRS, 2019-02-03 01:32:06

Conclusion: What to monitor and how you respond to the data is often poorly documented and not fully understood until after a failure occurs. In this world of “no surprises”, effective monitoring is a key success factor. If an organisation’s ICT monitoring strategy is to be successful it must be structured around the organisation’s business outcomes. The monitoring strategy framework is achieved through the alignment of the organisation’s critical-business functions, the ICT high-level design, the ICT architecture and the priorities set out in the organisation’s disaster recovery plan (DRP) as the primary influencing factors.
Key to an effective DRP is a clear understanding of the system architecture and design, with sound knowledge of the risks and weaknesses it brings in support of critical business functions. When the ICT monitoring strategy is based on this framework it will deliver a near real-time health status of the organisation’s ICT environment, allow for planning future capacity, and in the investigation of incidents when they occur. An effective monitoring strategy will be business-focused and not monitoring for monitoring’s sake.


Read more


Conclusion: Cloud offerings are now commercially available, allowing CIOs to engage the technology offerings with a high degree of trust that the service is secure and responsive at reduced cost to in-house solutions.

CEOs have an obligation to ensure their organisation’s IT systems are cost-effective and meet the security accreditation defined by government (or their Board). PROTECTED Cloud services can reduce cost of operations and meet many of the CEO’s obligations for accreditation (and review) of services, and therefore better manage risk, to meet government and best practice commercial security requirements.

All PROTECTED Cloud data centres certified by ASD are physically located in Australia. Depending on your needs, they all meet Australian Government data sovereignty requirements and offer low latency and in-country technical support teams to assist clients. Provision of PROTECTED Cloud services allows the CIO to restructure IT, moving to a more agile and potentially lower cost option to provide the appropriate security approach.


Read more


Conclusion: CIOs should consider the environments for their PROTECTED information, both when building new capability and/or when renewing older infrastructure and services. The need to have cost-effective infrastructure services (in-house or IaaS), accredited security of services and responsiveness for clients using the service are three key deliverables for any CIO.

The Australian Government has identified PROTECTED ratings be applied where systems and data are at risk and where the systems or data are critical to ensuring national interest, business continuity and integrity of an individual’s data. Critical business functions are a combination of the IT systems they run on and the data they consume.

Defining what should be afforded a PROTECTED rating and therefore adequately protected is an ongoing challenge. The Australian Government’s Information Security Manual (ISM) and recent legislation “Security of Critical Infrastructure Act 2018” detail the requirements and framework for reporting, on government-run IT systems and critical infrastructure. Using this framework as a base, organisations should assess whether the data or IT environments that support critical business functions should be treated as PROTECTED.


Read more


Related Articles:

"Canberra-based Azure is about much more than security" IBRS, 2018-04-14 13:43:57

"On-Premises Cloud: Real flexibility or just a finance plan?" IBRS, 2017-05-06 06:37:20

"Running IT-as-a-Service Part 33: How to transition to hybrid Cloud" IBRS, 2017-08-02 02:32:44