Joseph Sweeney

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Dr. Joseph Sweeney is an IBRS advisor specialising in the areas of end user computing, including: mobility, future workplace strategies, enterprise solutions, collaboration, policy, organisational cultural change, and software deployment and licensing.  He is the author of IBRS’s Mobility Strategy Framework. He has a particular focus on Microsoft products, and often assists organisations in rationalising their Microsoft licensing spend and helping to identify budget for end user computing innovation. Dr. Sweeney is an accomplished business strategist and pioneer of Asia’s internet industry. He was a cofounder and Vice President, of Asia Online, where he headed up product development  and assisted the start-up grow into one of Asia’s leading Internet and on-line services. He is also deeply engaged in the education sector. He was awarded the University of Newcastle Medial in 2007 for his studies in Education, and his doctorate, granted in 2015, was based on research into Australia’s educational ICT policies for student device deployments.

Conclusion: IBRS’s Business Priorities Atlas presents the highest-level view of Australian business priorities and the likely technological landmarks for 2017. While the Atlas is largely unchanged from 2016, there is a far greater focus on delivering IT “as a service” and security. The move from the desktop-era work environment to a more flexible “digital workspace” is well underway. Use the Atlas to stimulate discussion between senior IT and non-IT executives as to what, where and when to invest in 2017 through to 2018.

Conclusion: Serverless programming is a new paradigm for developing and running Cloud-native solutions. It holds the promise of creating far more scalable solutions that ‘stitch together’ other Cloud services, making it the much-needed ‘programmatic underpinning’ for the Cloud. It is as significant a shift in software development as object orientation was from procedural programming in the 1980s.

However, serverless programming is immature, and its use cases not well understood. The timing for development teams to engage with serverless programming is largely dependent upon an organisation’s appetite for adopting bleeding-edge, Cloud-based services. The more services being adopted, the sooner the team should begin to learn this new programming paradigm. Even when used, care should be taken to limit the scope of deployment of serverless programs.


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Conclusion: On 1st October, Microsoft introduced a number of changes to its licensing regime, changed the names of several products, added two new packages under the new Secure Productive Enterprise (SPE) portfolio and introduced new licensing rights1.

The new licensing packages are aimed at taking organisations on a journey off Cap-Ex (persistent) licensing for devices, toward Op-Ex (subscription) licensing for users.

Understanding the new Secure Productive Enterprise licensing packages is essential for organisations embarking on a move to digital workspaces, and those renegotiating Enterprise Agreements (EAs) within the next nine months.


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Workforce transformation embraces far more than just mobility: it embraces not only where work gets done, but how, when and by whom. Much has been written about the fact that many jobs will cease to exist, while many others will transform beyond all recognition. And the impact these workforce changes will have on hiring practices and the structure of business is significant.


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IBRS iQ is a database of Client inquiries and is designed to get you talking to our Advisors about these topics in the context of your organisation in order to provide tailored advice for your needs.


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Conclusion: Even though stakeholders may support ‘Digital’ initiatives – due in no small part to the all-encompassing nature of the term ‘Digital’ in today’s market – many of these initiatives will fail to deliver on the original intent. This is because the term ‘Digital’ enables stakeholders to reinterpret the intent of an initiative in a number of different ways. This can cause stakeholders – both within ICT groups and within the organisation more broadly – to take actions that deviate from the original intent, or that resist attempts to change. Even when organisations have put in place governance and processes to reconfirm stakeholders’ understanding of the initiative’s intentions, reinterpretations and misaligned actions can still occur.

By understanding the types of ‘mutation’ that stem from the use of ‘Digital’, and by appreciating the limitations of traditional methods of checking stakeholder alignment, policy and program leads can minimise the risk of projects being implemented in unexpected ways.


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All too often mobility solutions are developed or procured in isolation to address narrow business needs, without consideration of how such solutions will scale-up into production or fit within the larger ICT ecosystem. Over time this hinders ICT’s agility in providing mobile solutions and increases the risks of project failures.

A Mobility Solution Delivery Framework can help maintain agility in mobility solution delivery and reduces risks. Moreover, it ensures a close alignment between business needs and investments in mobility.


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Conclusion: All too often mobility solutions are developed or procured in isolation to address narrow business needs, without consideration of how such solutions will scale-up into production or fit within the larger ICT ecosystem. Over time this hinders ICT’s agility in providing mobile solutions and increases the risks of project failures.

A Mobility Solution Delivery Framework can help maintain agility in mobility solution delivery and reduces risks. Moreover, it ensures a close alignment between business needs and investments in mobility. This paper outlines the essential components of a Mobility Solution Delivery Framework.


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You have probably already started some mobility initiatives for your organisation, and that is a good thing, because mobility has the potential to be truly transformative to many, many industries.

Not only does it change where work gets done, but in many cases it can change how work gets done, and even who does the work. It can actually alter the structure of your workplace. So mobility clearly is something that you want to look for, if you're striving for innovation.

But one of the things that we've noticed with many, many organisations that we have dealt with and many, many case studies we have been involved with, is that over about two or three years tops, many mobility initiatives start to bog down. It starts getting harder and harder and harder for organisations to really keep up that speed of development, to maintain that rate of innovation.

This is so common that we have a term for it: we call it the Burning Rabbit syndrome,


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Conclusion: The use of the term ‘Digital’ as an adjective plays a particular role in both public and private sector initiatives. Like similar terms of the past, it creates a space for agreement among multiple stakeholders, even when there is a lack of universal understanding. This is useful when an initiative includes an interplay of technology and culture. It allows advocates to collapse a multitude of complex issues into a simple catch-all phrase to which everyone already agrees. However, understanding the benefit of using ‘Digital’ to gain agreement for an initiative needs to be weighed up against the potential of seeing well-intentioned initiatives implemented in unexpected ways.


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