AWS

The Latest

09 November 2021: Amazon Web Services (AWS) announced the availability of Babelfish for Amazon Aurora. Babelfish enables its hyperscale Aurora relational database service to understand Microsoft SQL Server and PostgreSQL commands. This allows customers to run applications written for Microsoft SQL Server directly on Amazon Aurora with minimal modifications in the code. 

Why it’s Important.

This new feature in Amazon Aurora, means enterprises with legacy applications can migrate to the Cloud without the time, effort and huge costs involved in rewriting application codes. In addition, using Babelfish benefits organisations through:

  • Reduced migration costs and no expensive lock-in licensing terms, unlike in commercial-grade databases
  • No interruption in existing Microsoft SQL Server database use since Babelfish can handle the TDS network protocol
  • Availability of the open-source version of Babelfish for PostgreSQL on GitHub under the permissive Apache 2.0 and PostgreSQL licenses 

Who’s impacted

  • CIO
  • Development team leads
  • Business analysts

What’s Next?

More general availability of hyperscale Cloud computing to support scalability and high-performance needs is expected in the coming months from major vendors. The most successful ones will require minimal changes in enterprises' existing SQL Server application code, speed of migration, and ease of switching to other tools post-migration.

Related IBRS Advisory

  1. VENDORiQ: Google Next: Data - PostgreSQL Spanning the Globe
  2. VENDORiQ: Google introduces Database Migration Service

The Latest

16 August 2021: VMware and AWS announced that VMware Cloud had been independently assessed by an Information Security Registered Assessors Program (IRAP) assessor against the Information Security Manual (ISM) PROTECTED controls.

Why it’s Important

IBRS has noted that VMware Cloud is becoming increasingly popular as a management platform for hybrid Cloud. Its main attraction is that it offers a smooth ‘lift-and-shift’ of on-premises vSphere environments to a hyperscale over time, with different aspects of the data centre ecosystem running in the Cloud and/or on-prem. The VMCloud approach is particularly attractive for heavily regulated organisations and agencies, since it supports Amazon Elastic Compute Cloud elastic, bare-metal infrastructure. 

By assessing the VMCloud service, public sector customers have the opportunity to accelerate their Cloud migration, moving more of the load from on-prem environments to Cloud, while retaining operational consistency with their on-prem data centre.

While VMware Cloud IRAP for PROTECTED status is very much welcome, there is also the risk that IRAP is treated more as a ‘check-box’ in a security policy, rather than a foundation on which to build robot security practices. Many Cloud breaches are not the result of zero day exploits or misconfigurations from vendors (despite recent issues with Azure) but rather weak configuration management. This is exacerbated by the ongoing skills shortage in Cloud engineers, plus the even more critical shortage of cyber security professionals.

VMware Cloud provides common approaches to managing the Cloud environment, but it is only as good as the attention to detail given to the configuration of the environment. Tools such as GorillaStack can assist, but operational security is ultimately a matter of practice.

Who’s impacted

  • CISO
  • Cloud teams

What’s Next?

When considering Cloud management tools, security certifications and IRAP assessments are a sign that the vendor has best practices in place, but are not a panacea for mitigating risk. Treat them accordingly. 

Related IBRS Advisory

  1. Cloud Security Considerations – Lessons from the Frontline
  2. PROTECTED Cloud: Cyber considerations
  3. The value proposition for PROTECTED Cloud
  4. Why Cloud Certified People Are in Hot Demand
  5. VENDORiQ: Microsoft Cloud Database Security Flaw - A Nightmare or a Wake-up Call?

The Latest

2 July 2021: Amazon released a video summary and report on its sustainability targets and performance. The key take outs are that Amazon is the largest corporate purchaser of renewable energy, with a shift of 42% from non-renewable within one year. The underlying message here is sustainability is no longer a political issue for the corporate sector, but a fiscal imperative.  

Why it’s Important

As outlined in previous IBRS research, all of the hyperscale cloud vendors - Google, AWS, Microsoft, Oracle and Alibaba - have well-documented strategies to reduce their reliance on carbon-based fuel sources. All position sustainability as a competitive advantage, not just against each other, but against on-premises data centres. 

It is likely that cloud vendors will be positioning their sustainability credentials in both business and general news channels, looking to position their brand as a leader on climate action. From a cynical view, this messaging will play well with the existing news cycle of the impact of climate change, from the disastrous bushfires to killer heatwaves in North America, to unseasonable storms and record-setting weather events. From a more optimistic perspective, these vendors will drive genuine solutions to reduce the carbon footprint associated with providing computing service.

Therefore, as cloud vendors set or meet zero carbon energy targets, the issue of sustainable ICT is set to re-emerge as a priority for CIOs and data centre architects.  

IBRS and BIAP (via the IT Leaders Summits) have tracked CIOs interest in the topic of green IT. An IBRS study in 2008 had sustainable ICT being rated as ‘very important’ for 25% of CIOs and ‘somewhat important’ for 59% of CIOs. Since then, interest in sustainable computing has plummeted year-on-year. The IBRS / BIAP data for 2016 had 6% of CIOs rating sustainable ICT as a priority. By 2020, less than 0.5% of CIOs rated sustainable ICT as a priority.

IBRS expects this trend to reverse sharply in 2024-2025 as the leading cloud vendors continue to demonstrate both environmental and financial benefits associated with renewable energy.

Who’s impacted

  • CIO
  • CFO
  • Data centre leads
  • Infrastructure architects

What’s Next?

By 2025 the leading cloud vendors will leverage their position in renewable energy consumption as a selling point for policy-makers to mandate cloud computing and place unattainable goals for architects of on-premises data centres.

Rather than waiting, CIOs should review previous strategies for sustainable ICT, with the expectation that these will need to be updated and reinstated within the next 3-5 years.

Related IBRS Advisory

  1. The Status of Green IT in Australian and New Zealand (2008)
  2. Building your Green IT strategy
  3. Think green IT: Think saving money
  4. Forget Green; think sustainable computing in 2009

Conclusion: Organisations using Microsoft Server licences should consider leveraging the full potential of recent developments in the AWS licence suite. For more than a decade, AWS Cloud services have provided different organisations reliable data servicing and fewer downtime hours. AWS suggests that it offers clients more instances and twice the performance rate on SQL servers compared to other Cloud providers. Clients will need to have a performance rating in mind to validate these services for their own use.

Over the past decade, AWS has sought to innovate its processes and features following customer feedback. For example, the AWS License Manager was developed after customer feedback as a one-stop solution that manages usage limits and enables IT licensing optimisation across a variety of software vendors and across hybrid environments. It is important for customers to compare this licence management solution with other Cloud providers to validate the additional benefits.