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  • Workforce transformation Part 6: Microsoft Teams user adoption

    Conclusion: When it comes to embracing collaboration, organisations should recognise that it is difficult to manage diverse personalities, perceptions and beliefs. In addition, every individual is going to have their preference on what makes a ‘good collaboration system’.

    As a result, it is vital that project leads carefully consider the role staff play in a

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  • Workforce transformation Part 5: Planning for Microsoft Teams – Create a vision and assess your collaboration ecosystem

    Conclusion: Microsoft Teams is a collaborative hub for teamwork with links to a wide range of information sources and communication capabilities. While a latecomer to the collaboration software solution market, Teams benefits from being included in Microsoft’s 365 platform, which means many organisations have ready access to collaboration capabilities without the licensing

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  • Running IT-as-a-Service Part 57: Cloud migration strategy – pragmatic approach

    Conclusion: IT organisations wishing to migrate to Cloud should adopt a pragmatic approach that strikes a balance between migration cost, Cloud risks and benefits. The bottom line is to avoid the hidden cost (e.g. scope changes), mitigate the migration risks (e.g. effective multi-Cloud management) and realise the benefits that contribute to business performance improvement.

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  • Running IT-as-a-Service Part 54: Release and change management facelift

    Conclusion: While release and change management processes have been contributing to good service availability during the last 20 years, the increased service architecture complexity caused by adopting multiple Cloud and digital services has demonstrated that release and change management methods used to date are inadequate for the new world. As a result, end users have been

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  • Enterprise resource planning (ERP) Part 2: Planning the ERP strategy for modernisation

    Conclusion: Reimagining the ERP strategy will require IT and business collaboration to ensure requirements are clear. Retaining the 5–10 year old ERP system1 may serve back office functions but this may impede innovation. ERP customisation is being replaced by vendors who deliver regular updates to their SaaS ERP model. This provides

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  • Enterprise resource planning (ERP) Part 1: Is your ERP SW licensing aligned to your ICT strategy?

    Conclusion: ERP SW licensing or Software-as-a-Service (SaaS) has many permutations and influences one of the largest IT investments for most organisations. Vendors aim to integrate, at a minimum, shared corporate data from financial data, HR, operations and sales. The benefits of aligned data, reporting and processes helps C-level decision makers track and improve

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  • Asset management maturity model: Are the processes a living part of your organisation?

    Conclusion: Asset management can be described as ‘the life cycle management of physical assets to achieve the stated outputs of the enterprise’. To achieve the appropriate level of asset management maturity, investment in people, processes and technology all increase the likelihood of developing an effective asset management system. Under-investment could result in

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  • Running IT-as-a-Service Part 50: Hybrid Cloud migration – Where is the money saving?

    Conclusion: External Cloud services can realise cost reduction up to 50 % p. a. and promise no set-up or exit fees. While the ongoing cost reduction is realistic, there are significant other costs related to third-party services that should be considered to calculate the overall cost saving of Cloud migration. They are:

    • Transition-in cost due to the use of
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  • Running IT-as-a-Service Part 49: The case for hybrid Cloud migration

    Conclusion: Public Cloud is not the solution to all IT organisations’ technology and services problems. This is because most IT organisations use a portfolio of environments such as legacy systems, in-house and outsourced services, customised IT service management tools and standard applications (e. g. email) that cannot be all retrofitted in a public Cloud architecture

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  • Running IT-as-a-Service Part 46: Mergers and acquisitions impact on service contracts

    Conclusion: IT organisations revisiting their service contracts as a result of mergers and acquisitions should establish a federated vendor management arrangement. The rationale is to ensure central consistency while retaining local autonomy to address tactical matters. For example, the central consistency demands leveraging the economy of scale to reduce cost, whilst the

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    Related Articles:

    "Delivering IT-as-a-Service requires an Enterprise Architecture for IT" IBRS, 2017-09-02 01:42:22

    "Mergers, Acquisitions and Divestitures: What does it mean to your business?" IBRS, 2017-01-01 10:35:33

    "Running IT as a Service Part 1: Prerequisite Building Blocks" IBRS, 2014-10-01 18:33:12

    "What to do when your vendor gets acquired" IBRS, 2003-07-28 00:00:00

  • Running IT-as-a-Service Part 43: Service level penalties and incentives for hybrid Cloud

    Conclusion: Penalties and incentives are designed to ensure agreed critical service levels are achieved. Penalties are enforced whenever service levels are not met. Incentives are rewarded whenever agreed service levels are exceeded. However, there are cases whereby providers prefer to pay the penalty instead of improving the service level. For example, it is easier to pay a

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    Related Articles:

    "Public Cloud Success requires Mature Governance" IBRS, 2014-01-30 00:00:00

    "Running IT-as-a-Service Part 31: Maximising relationship management ROI" IBRS, 2017-06-04 03:41:00

    "Running IT-as-a-Service Part 38: Successful hybrid Cloud requires multi-provider governance framework" IBRS, 2018-02-01 10:08:33

  • Canberra-based Azure is about much more than security

    Conclusion: On 3rd April 2018, Microsoft announced the availability of its Azure Cloud running within Canberra Data Centres (CDC) facilities, and officially rated for protected workloads.

    Superficially, this appears to boost Microsoft’s ability to “check off” security concerns for government and other clients that have specific compliance demands.

    While

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  • Prepare to manage the “evolution” of AI-based solutions with “DataOps”

    Conclusion: The development of AI-based solutions is heavily dependent on various types of data input in the form of either:

    • Large data sets used to conduct experiments to develop models and algorithms for predictive analytics, optimisation and decision recommendations; or
    • Enriched and tagged corpuses of images, audio, video and unstructured text used
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  • Governance steps for artificial intelligence

    Conclusion: Business leaders should convert recent global interest in AI applications, safety and effectiveness into AI governance guidelines in the exercise of their triple bottom line responsibilities (for profit, social responsibility and sustainability) as outlined in IBRS research note, “The emerging need for IT governance in artificial intelligence”...

  • Proactive optical character recognition of incoming content will accelerate AI-enabled automation

    Conclusion: Although online digital platforms are in ready supply, organisations remain unable to avoid the receipt of critical information in the form of paper documents or scanned images. Whether from government, suppliers or clients, organisations are faced with written correspondence, typed material, completed forms or signed documents that must be consumed. For a variety

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  • Machine learning will displace “extract, transform and load” in business intelligence and data integration

    Conclusion:Organisations continue to emphasise their competitive differentiation based on the data they hold, and the insights gained from analysing this valuable resource. The rate at which organisations are shifting from traditional process-based to insight-oriented differentiation is being further accelerated by the adoption of Cloud-based data analytics

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    Related Articles:

    "Acknowledging the limits of machine learning during AI-enabled transformation" IBRS, 2019-01-06 22:29:52

  • The emerging need for IT governance in artificial intelligence

    Conclusion:AI includes a very broad range of technologies being applied in virtually all industries. AI is being used in new stand-alone services like real-time language translation1 or extensions of existing common IT applications such as the increasing use of chatbots in contact centres or recommendation engines in digital

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  • AWS, Google and Microsoft setting the pace for security by design

    Conclusion:The security capabilities of Cloud vendors have evolved rapidly since 2008. Specifically, the three big Cloud vendors Microsoft, Google and AWS understand the importance of trust and assurance for their corporate and government customers and are each working aggressively on continual service improvement. Most customers are more likely to suffer security issues

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  • Preparing for networking in the Cloud

    Conclusion:Preparing the modern business for Cloud requires a common computing and networking infrastructure with new Cloud architectures converging with data centres over a hybrid of both direct Cloud connections and traditional wide area networking.

    Organisations must begin by conducting a “triage” of their applications into three networking categories: those in

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  • Records management discipline must not be ignored during digital transformation

    Conclusion:The current wave of digital transformation will see the retirement of large numbers of legacy systems. Although the cost of operations, including storage of data, in newer Cloud-based solutions is often cheaper, the cost of migration of historical data to new platforms can be significant. IBRS has observed increasing numbers of digital transformation projects

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  • Buying in Cloud Marketplaces

    Conclusion:IBRS’ finding is that prominent Cloud marketplaces (CMPs) such as AWS Marketplace1, Microsoft Azure2, Google Cloud Platform3 and IBM Bluemix4 are gaining traction as alternatives to conventional enterprise ICT

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  • On-Premises Cloud: Real flexibility or just a finance plan?

    Conclusion: Paying for Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS) which is kept on-premises, but paid for on an Opex model rather than as a Capex outlay, is often positioned as ‘Cloud-like’. There can be use cases and specific workloads where this model makes sense and does give some advantages to the organisation.

    However, on-premises management of an organisation’s own

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  • Google’s Next Step: An Enterprise Focus

    Conclusion: For the first time, Google has articulated a comprehensive go-to-market strategy for enterprise Cloud services. While the company has the technology and scale needed, it is only now outlining why organisations may wish to consider the Google Cloud Platform. Google will create a direct data centre presence in Australia in 2017 and is rapidly building a

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  • IBRS SaaS Migration Methodology (Video)

    In this interview, Dr Wissam Raffoul outlines a practical and effective approach to migrating to an As-a-Service model. 

  • SaaS Migration Methodologies

    Conclusion: While IaaS and PaaS adoption has been increasing, most IT organisations are hesitant to migrate their legacy systems to public SaaS. This is primarily due to the applications being highly customised resulting in a significant effort being required to retrofit existing systems to migrate them to public SaaS architecture in the Cloud.

  • Serverless Programming: Should your software development teams be exploring it?

    Conclusion: Serverless programming is a new paradigm for developing and running Cloud-native solutions. It holds the promise of creating far more scalable solutions that ‘stitch together’ other Cloud services, making it the much-needed ‘programmatic underpinning’ for the Cloud. It is as significant a shift in software development as object orientation was from procedural

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  • Community Clouds – better together?

    Conclusion: Community Clouds can provide the expected value of using “Cloud”-based services in a shared environment that may be more economical than a closed private Cloud or privately owned and managed IT solutions. But economics may not be the driving factor. Identifying a common “customer” need or client base can be the main driver to getting similar organisations to agree

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  • Network Virtualisation – Security drives adoption

    Conclusion: The introduction of Software Defined Networking (SDN) offerings touted a number of benefits around simpler and more agile network management and provisioning, lowering capital and operational costs.

  • Going to Cloud: Plan to fail to improve success

    Conclusion: Organisations considering applications migration to a Cloud service provider may lack the experience to understand potential risks or how to select a service provider. This may result in budget overrun or inability to meet business needs.

    While planning to engage a service provider, a “Plan B” (to invoke in case of failure) is needed to strengthen the

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  • How to get on top of Cloud billing

    Conclusion: Application developers and IT Managers have become enthusiastic adopters of Cloud due to the apparent large cost savings and short development time compared to using internal infrastructure when prototyping projects. However, they are often unaware

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  • DreamLabs’ vastly distributed processing as an Enterprise Use Case

    Conclusion: Vodafone Foundation’s DreamLab1 charity has shown in its work with The Garvan Institute for Medical Research how a huge and diverse collection of the public’s volunteered processing on their smartphones can

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  • Running IT-as-a-Service Part 19: The emergence of Cloud service brokers

    Conclusion: While the increased adoption of public IaaS1 can reduce cost and simplify technology procurement challenges, IaaS does not meet all IT organisations’ sourcing requirements such as legacy applications maintenance and IT service management. Hence, IT organisations are left with no alternative but to use

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  • APRA and the Cloud: Organisations must be able to show their working

    Conclusion: IT executives in financial services organisations have expressed frustration at the seemingly vague requirements of APRA, but this misses the true intention of APRA. APRA is not anti-Cloud, but the regulator insists that financial services

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  • Positive customer experiences must lead digital transformation

    Conclusion: User-centricity, positive customer experiences (CX) and active customer engagement are the necessary central drivers of any business’ digital transformation.

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  • Business Case evidence for Cloud Contact Centres

    Conclusion: Advisor reviews of recent business cases evaluating Cloud contact centres (CC) show that any upgrade needs to be driven by a customer service business strategy (not just a technology refresh).

    Cloud delivery has become the dominant technology for any new contact Centres for two

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  • Why in-house IT is not like Cloud (Part 2)

    Conclusion: Most IT professionals see Cloud as simply a replacement (sometimes even competition) for the tasks they do now – provide CPU cycles, storage and internal communications. Looking at Cloud through such a narrow lens is a big mistake. Cloud is not just a replacement for IT processes – it is a replacement for all business processes that are

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    Related Articles:

    "Why In-House IT is not like Cloud" IBRS, 2016-03-01 05:05:35

  • The journey to Office 365: A guiding framework Part 2 migration

    Conclusion: Deployment of Office 365 as a pure Cloud solution has lagged the sales of Office 365 licences. This is partly due to lack of formal migration strategies, confusion over the licensing and user options1, although non-technical issues play a bigger role. To assist in the move to Office 365, IBRS has identified a

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    Related Articles:

    "The Journey to Office 365" IBRS, 2015-05-01 14:58:56

    "The journey of Office 365: A guiding framework Part 3: Post-implementation" IBRS, 2016-05-05 00:21:00

    "The journey to Office 365: A guiding framework Part 1" IBRS, 2016-03-01 04:23:10

    "The journey to Office 365: Part 4 – Skills" IBRS, 2016-06-02 00:26:00

  • Why In-House IT is not like Cloud

    Conclusion: Cloud architectures offer a vast array of possibilities that are not an option for organisations limited to conventional IT solutions. Do not let infrastructure people convince the organisation they can match Cloud capabilities solely using legacy in-house resources

    Related Articles:

    "Why in-house IT is not like Cloud (Part 2)" IBRS, 2016-04-01 05:08:33

  • The journey to Office 365: A guiding framework Part 1

    Conclusion: Deployment of Office 365 as a pure Cloud solution has lagged the sales of Office 365 licences. This is largely due to IT groups’ unfamiliarity with the Office 365 environment: unlike Office Professional, Office 365 can be run across new devices, provides real-time collaboration1 and offers new tools based

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    Related Articles:

    "The Journey to Office 365" IBRS, 2015-05-01 14:58:56

    "The journey of Office 365: A guiding framework Part 3: Post-implementation" IBRS, 2016-05-05 00:21:00

    "The journey to Office 365: A guiding framework Part 2 migration" IBRS, 2016-04-01 04:43:19

    "The journey to Office 365: Part 4 – Skills" IBRS, 2016-06-02 00:26:00

  • Running IT-as-a-Service Part 14: Digital transformation requires a new software release approach

    Conclusion: IT organisations should not be treating software releases to support the digital transformation as “business as usual”, because they may overlook the demand for extra-company IT management process integration, rapid application deployment, and speedy problem resolution. IT organisations should recreate their “release to production” processes to

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  • Don’t let poor research cloud your thinking

    Conclusion: Industry discussion regarding Cloud based IT business models, have found it easy to claim a level of expertise simply by publishing high level observations and unsubstantiated predictions. Unfortunately, while interesting, these observations and predictions have offered little assistance to IT executives looking to design a future IT service based on

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  • Running IT-as-a-Service Part 12: The evolution of Service Catalogues

    Conclusion: The Service Catalogue required by the ITIL framework has undergone several variations during the last 20 years. The rationale was to address the emerging service trends in in-house and outsourced modes of operations. However, while the original service catalogues’ objectives were achieved, they are inadequate in acquiring hybrid Cloud core services

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  • Running IT-as-a-Service Part 11: DevOps is not different from mature ITIL Release Management

    Conclusion: There is debate within the IT industry whether or not DevOps can replace ITIL1. From ITIL perspective, many IT organisations, especially in Australia, have been implementing ITIL processes since 1994 with significant investment in technology and professional services. Hence, it is impractical to just drop ITIL and

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  • Running IT-as-a-Service Part 10: Designing Practical Configuration Management Databases

    Conclusion: Since 1994 many Australian IT organisations have been implementing Configuration Management practices. However, it has been done with limited success when assessed against the key objectives of Configuration Management process and its associated database (CMDB) in terms of service availability and configuration items interdependencies. IT

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  • Running IT-as-a-Service Part 9: Significant ERP Maintenance Savings are real

    Conclusion: One IT-as-a-Service strategy remains to migrate legacy systems to SaaS to reduce cost, improve service level and achieve excellence in end user experience. However, large-scale ERP SaaS migrations are still not imminent, primarily due to the significant ERP customisation made by Australian organisations during the last twenty years, which prevent the

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  • VMware Air: Its Potential and Use Cases

    Conclusion: With the local availability of VMware’s Infrastructure as a Service (vCloud Air), all Australian VMware customers should consider it for self-service dev/test environments, virtual desktops, and more importantly DR as a Service (DRaaS). Savvy CIOs will use low risk, low cost practical experiments to develop in-house skills and experience while

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  • Running IT-as-a-Service Part 8: Governance processes critical for HyperCloud success

    Conclusion: IT organisations adopting IT-as-a-Service strategies tend to acquire the best of breed services from the market instead of building them in-house. This leads to increased adoption of multi-sourced services, whereby reliable governance processes are critical success factors to realise the desired business benefits in a timely and cost-effective

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  • The Federal Government’s Cloud Policy – Leading bravely into the past

    Conclusion: the Department of Finance has produced a Cloud Policy that is linked to a paper about Cloud implementation that does not mention modern Cloud architecture, which in turn is linked to an architecture paper that does not mention Cloud.

    Agencies looking to adopt Cloud services are advised to look for advice beyond the Australian Government’s

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  • The Era of In-House Email is over – What’s next?

    Conclusion: email and basic collaboration services have reached a point where Cloud-based solutions deliver features, quality of service and reliability at price points that cannot be met by the vast majority of in-house IT groups. The question is not should an organisation move its email and basic collaborations services to the Cloud, or even when an

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  • Bulletproof results reveal rush to public cloud services - The Age itpro -11 March 2015

    Cloud computing — where organisations run their IT applications remotely on computers operated by 'cloud service providers' — has grown rapidly in Australia, with major global players and a number of local companies

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  • Rightsizing: Hipages finds the best way to tackle the Amazon cloud - SMH itpro - 10 Mar 2015

    To move or not to move to the cloud is not the only question companies need to ask when considering the bottom line, as 10-year-old Australian company Hipages found out.

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  • Security skills and the Cloud: Damned if you do and doubly damned if you don’t

    Conclusion: as cyber-security becomes a board-level topic, organisations in the A/NZ region are feeling the pinch of the security skills shortage. In this environment, moving IT services to the Cloud has the potential to streamline and/or automate some basic IT security practices. Cloud services are not an IT security silver bullet, but for many organisations,

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  • Does Cloud Email really need third party archiving?

    Conclusion:when considering Cloud based email (Microsoft or Google) organisations should critically re-evaluate the need for third party Email Archive add-ons. Since Cloud-based email has virtually unlimited mailbox capacity the archive/storage management features of third party Email Archive add-ons many not be needed.

    For many organisations the native compliance

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  • Identification of Product Line Stakeholders and Product Line Scope

    Conclusion: A product line engineering approach to digital service development and operation can unlock significant value if due diligence is applied when identifying product line stakeholders and product line scope. A successful product line is one that enables all stakeholders to apply their unique expertise within the context of the product line at exactly

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  • How I learned to stop worrying and love the Cloud

    Conclusion: When moving from traditional on-premises IT to Cloud it is important to update the Business Leaders and Executive on the risks. Rather than try to quantify the absolute risks, as the first step in gaining acceptance, explain how the risks of Cloud compare with the current on-premises, or MSP, solution. Offer ideas on risk mitigation that might be

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  • Last Word: Public Cloud simplifies complex Configuration Management Setup

    Many Australian IT organisations have been implementing Configuration Management practices since 1994. However, with limited success when assessed against the key objectives of Configuration Management process and its associated database (CMDB).

  • Essential Digital Product Line Design Goals

    Conclusion: The digitisation of service delivery in the finance, insurance, and government sectors means that all organisations in these sectors are now in the business of developing, maintaining, and operating software products for millions of users, with profound implications for organisational structures1, business

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  • Pragmatically transforming to Hybrid Cloud

    Conclusion: Once an organisation decides its on-premises IT infrastructure model must be transformed into a Hybrid Cloud model the important question becomes “how is this best achieved?” While

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  • Which Workload is suitable for Public Cloud?

    Conclusion: Cloud migration should not be a quick and dirty job just to upload the current business systems with their inefficiencies, only to get rid of the in-house hardware ownership. It should be considered as an opportunity to clean IT and business inefficiencies at the same time. IT organisations wishing to migrate to public Cloud require a new methodology

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  • Microsoft Office’s Sticking Points when moving to the Cloud

    Conclusion: Organisations that have made a move to Google in an effort to reduce their reliance on the incumbent Microsoft Office Suite have found that migrating from Microsoft involves far more than just human change management. Technological linkages with the Office desktop client(s) hold back organisations’ transfer to the Cloud. Before implementing

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  • Last Word: Australia has its head in the Cloud

    While hyper-scale vendors have been a little slow in opening data centres in the Australian market, the anecdotal evidence is the take-up is very strong:

  • Risk management and quality assurance of large enterprise Cloud service rollouts

    Conclusion:When implementing enterprise Cloud services, a disciplined and locally distributed approach to user acceptance testing in combination with real-time dashboards for test management and defect management can be used as the centrepiece of a highly scalable quality assurance framework. An effective quality assurance process can go a long way to minimise

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  • Plugging into the Hybrid Cloud

    Conclusion: There are many different Hybrid Cloud approaches, each with different costs, risks and benefits. Organisations should evaluate the alternatives to find which is best aligned to their business requirements, then update IT governance processes to guide the organisation towards the chosen Hybrid Cloud strategy. Failure to align to the right Hybrid Cloud

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  • Usage Management Maturity Self-Assessment – Part 2

    Conclusion: While many IT organisations believe that using public IaaS (e.g. AWS, Microsoft Azure, Google) to host business applications is a cost-effective strategy, the lack of IaaS usage planning will most likely increase consumption cost. IBRS recommends that IT organisations undertake a self-assessment of their usage management practices prior to migration to public

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  • Managing usage in Public IaaS - Part 1

    Conclusion: IT organisations' lack of IaaS usage planning will most likely increase consumption cost. As a result, IT organisations should work closely with business units to understand usage patterns and track monthly usage against

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  • Cloud Services and Change Management within Organisations

    Conclusion: A majority of organisations around the world and across Australia are implementing or trialling some form of Cloud service whether it be IaaS, PaaS or SaaS. While Cloud services offer many potential benefits to organisations they can increase complexity in a number of areas of IT service management. Organisations may implement a hybrid Cloud

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  • Moving to the Cloud: Customer maturity but not as we know it

    Conclusion: Moving services to the Cloud is a part of nearly all organisational strategic plans. Organisations today are either starting to trial services with one provider, moving from the trial phase to include additional services or heavily focussed on Cloud as part of their service delivery model.

    Based on the learnings from

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  • Legacy Systems Migration to SaaS requiresRapid Business Process Redesign

    Conclusion: WhileI SaaS and PaaS adoption has been increasing during the last two years, most IT organisations are hesitant to migrate their legacy systems to public SaaS. This is primarily due to the applications being highly customised to support the current business mode of operations. As

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  • Selecting a Cloud Drive for Enterprise Use

    Conclusion: The proliferation of mobile devices and increasingly mobile staff in the enterprise is driving demand for file sharing and synchronisation services. In the absence of a usable offering from the organisation, users are turning to the ad-hoc use of consumer grade services. This is often referred to as ‘The Dropbox

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  • Last Word: Is IBM Serious about Public Cloud?

    While IBM is planning to invest A$1.4 million to grow its global datacentre facilities, its focus remains on private cloud with no serious public cloud offerings, As a result, IT organisations under traditional outsourcing contracts with IBM should examine the feasibility and cost-effectiveness of third party public cloud alternatives

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  • The future of IT outsourcing contracts

    Conclusion: 80% of traditional outsourcing contracts established in Australia during the last 25 years were renewed with the same service provider. However, with the emergence of public Cloud, IT

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  • Public Cloud requires IT procurement paradigm shift

    Conclusion: With the migration to complex hybrid sourcing strategies, traditional IT organisations based on ‘plan/build/run’ models won’t be suitable for acquiring public cloud services in an increasingly changing market. This is due to vague understanding of service total cost of ownership and limited contract negotiation skills. IT organisations wishing to rely on external

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  • HR in the Cloud; time to change your mindset

    Conclusion: The rapid adoption of SaaS by HR departments is a herald of the way IT departments will need to reinvent themselves. SaaS means that IT will not control everything, but there is an important role for influencing

    Last Word: Microsoft's new CEO - when the Cloud is not enough

    The drama surrounding Microsoft's new CEO has been something akin to the reality TV show ‘The Bachelor’. Who would be the perfect match for the rich, handsome, but somewhat socially awkward hunk?

    In order to answer this question,

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  • Using the Cloud for Disaster Recovery

    Conclusion: Disaster recovery continues to be an issue for many clients. Approaches based on tape have a low cost benefit but often recovery takes too long to meet the business’ requirements. The popular new approach of replicating data to a secondary data centre enables rapid recovery but at a cost which is prohibitive for some applications or smaller

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  • Public Cloud Success requires Mature Governance

    Conclusion: IT organisations wishing to maximise Public Cloud return on investment should adopt a Cloud Governance Maturity Model that ensures consistent delivery, builds trust and leverages new technology. This will enable IT organisations to effectively manage their sourcing portfolio by

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  • Last Word: Public Cloud Debate - Less Hot Air, more Facts!

    One of the most common and contentious infrastructure discussions that I have with clients today is the Public Cloud. The views of most IT executives have shifted from “if” to “when, what and how”. Like other big IT shifts, whether it be Mainframe to Midrange, the PC or Unix/RISC to virtualised Intel, there is much wailing and gnashing of teeth by the old guard about what will, frankly,

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  • IT Service Management: The cloud alternative

    Conclusion: In-house IT Service Management (ITSM) initiatives require considerable time and investment (up-to three years, up-to $1.5 million approximately). This has resulted in limited senior management continuous buy-in and reduced ITSM benefits realisation. Therefore, IT organisations wishing to implement ITSM should evaluate a public cloud alternative versus the cost and

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  • If it’s on-premises it’s not really a Cloud

    Conclusion:It has become common for IT staff to refer to their on-premises virtualised infrastructure as a Cloud. The unchallenged assumption is that their on-premises environment is as good as a Public Cloud (aka IaaS) and provides the same benefits.

    IT Executives and Enterprise Architects need to un-collapse these two concepts and

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  • Last Word: Your experience of the silver lining may vary

    In 2010, IBRS wrote that “My dog is a cloud” and noted that defining cloud was an

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  • In-house architecture complexity and cloud migrations

    Conclusion: IT organisations wishing to migrate in-house services to public cloud should ensure that service providers understand the complexity of the in-house architecture candidate for cloud migration. This can be achieved by identifying the in-house service failure points within the legacy applications and their associated infrastructure. The

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  • How to clarify the software needs for cloud deployment

    Conclusion: Given that the public cloud value is maximised when end-to-end SaaS is reached, IT organisations’ misunderstanding of SaaS building blocks, business applications architecture integration and lack of mature multi-sourced environment governance will limit SaaS public cloud adoption. CIOs should establish a cloud sourcing strategy to assess the feasibility and cost

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  • Cloud Integration Services: the next big thing?

    Conclusion:A new category of service provider is emerging in the cloud ecosystem: ‘Cloud Integration Services’. Cloud Integration Services will have significant implications for IT planning, investments, and the extent to which IT can maintain control over

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  • Construction of secure and resilient Cloud services

    Conclusion: In a few years from now the Cloud services we use today will look as quaint as the highly static Web of 1997 in the rear view mirror. In the wake of the global financial crisis the hype around big data is still on the increase, and big data is perceived as the new oil of the economic engine. At the same time, many of the

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  • Integration of Big Data Cloud formations - Cyclone alert

    Conclusion: Cloud infrastructure and platforms have started to alter the landscape of data storage and data processing. Software as a Service (SaaS) Customer Relationship Management (CRM) functionality such as Salesforce.com is considered best of breed, and even traditional vendors such as SAP are transitioning customers to SaaS solutions. The recent disclosure of global

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  • The three 'W's of moving to the Cloud

    Conclusion: While on-premises is still the dominant IT delivery model, Cloud is increasingly viewed as a robust complement or alternative. When evaluating new IT system and services ensure IT staff evaluate the use of Cloud as an alternative delivery model. The evaluation should include non-cost benefits, such as

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  • VMware builds a castle in its own cloud

    Conclusion: VMware’s new strategy of directly entering the IaaS market will create confusion and ultimately decimate VMware based IaaS vendors. IT organisations should manage the risks this creates with their current (or future) VMware based IaaS partners. In the long run the new strategy will benefit all customers by creating

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  • Look before you leap into SaaS using the Cloud

    Conclusion: Whilst SaaS (Software as a Service) using Cloud computing has helped commoditise IT, it is not always the ideal replacement for in-house application development. Instead the axiom ‘look before you

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  • White Paper: Risks in the cloud – check your contract

    IBRS, along with many other organisations, has written extensively about “the cloud”. Every organisation selling a product and/or service puts its own spin on what the cloud actually is.

    The appeal of cloud computing cannot be denied,and the buzz in the market for the last few years is evidence of the desire of IT organisations to find ways to deliver IT services that are:

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  • White Paper: The Cloud is a Journey

    The Cloud is a significant long-term trend that should not be ignored.Like the introduction of the PC and Open Systems in the ‘80s/‘90s,an IT organisation can either selectively embrace the Cloud, orfind itself bypassed by the business units who will introduce Cloudbased solutions to suit their needs.

    Organisations that do not embrace the cloud risk losing control ofthe IT

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  • DevOps - achieving resilience and agility in the Cloud

    Conclusion: DevOps is a grassroots movement that is only a few years old but has quickly spread across the globe, and its influence is present in virtually all organisations that operate popular Cloud services. DevOps is a portmanteau of software system Development and Operations, referring to the desire to bridge the gap

    ...
  • The cloud - too big to fail?

    Conclusion: Cloud services are not similar to a highly virtualised internal environment. Nor are they similar to the tightly controlled experience of time-sharing on a mainframe back in the 1970s. The supposed elasticity of the cloud has become a point of vulnerability because the elasticity is only partial, and only at certain

    ...
  • How do you catch a cloud and pin it down? Part 2

    Conclusion: Early adopters of cloud services often swept aside security and risk concerns, as these adopters were more interested in the end – a better IT service – rather than the means. But now organisations with mature risk and governance processes are looking at cloud services and risks are being identified and assessed for their potential impact. Cloud

    ...
    Related Articles:

    "How do you catch a cloud and pin it down? Part 1" IBRS, 2012-05-28 00:00:00

  • How do you catch a cloud and pin it down? Part 1

    Conclusion: Cloud offerings, particularly Software as a Service, have many technical risks to iron out before they are palatable for any organisation that has a mature governance requirement. The vendors know this, and because they don’t want to raise these issues in the minds of less mature organisations, their master

    ...
    Related Articles:

    "How do you catch a cloud and pin it down? Part 2" IBRS, 2012-07-27 00:00:00

  • Cloud security - the real risks

    Conclusion: As cloud services - typically Software as a Service - become increasingly accepted, the IT industry is gaining valuable experience in the actual risks of putting data in the cloud. Most of these risks centre around data confidentiality. Knowing the actual risks, rather than the fear, uncertainty and doubt that vendors and security consultants can throw at the

    ...
  • Last Word: Getting warm and fuzzy in the Cloud

    The Cloud is a significant long term trend that you ignore at your peril. Like the introduction of the PC and Open Systems in the ‘80s/‘90s, you can either selectively embrace the Cloud or find yourself bypassed by the business units who will introduce Cloud based solutions to suit their tactical needs and political agendas.

    Unless you embrace the cloud, albeit in a

    ...
  • A matrix for cloud computing risk analysis

    Conclusion: Cloud computing has multiple dimensions that must be considered when analysing risk. The use of four key variables can rapidly identify the expected level of risk in a cloud computing scenario. These four variables – deployment model, geographic location of data, supplier arrangements and information criticality – can be quickly applied to assess the

    ...
  • The state of infrastructure management in Australia - Cloud covers the outsourcing sky (Part 1)

    Conclusion: Outsourcing remains a core service delivery model for a significant number of Australian firms. As outsourcing evolves to encompass cloud based services alongside traditional infrastructure outsourcing and managed services relationships, options for the CIO have increased rapidly.

  • Last Word: Scattering clouds

    Three recent events have cast serious doubts on the viability of public cloud computing in the Australian marketplace. These events have raised critical concerns about the security, reliability and regulatory aspects of emerging cloud platforms in both public and private sectors.

  • Two tests to evaluate Cloud economics

    Conclusion: While it appears that every known test to evaluate cloud computing has been done, there are two which determine the accuracy of any savings claimed. Indeed, they could be applied to any evaluation of IT savings and not the cloud alone.

    To a large degree the tests discussed here challenge some processes of cost assessment, but IT

    ...

In the News

New cyber security rules reset $8b cloud marketplace - Financial Review - 26 July 2020

Philip Nesci, IBRS adviser and former CIO, has warned that agencies will need to get their information management sorted out to capitalise on the new rules. ‘‘Agencies need to identify their...
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Australia can build a culture of employee-led innovation - DropEverything - 24 July 2020

IBRS advisor Dr. Joseph Sweeney discusses why it falls to individuals to look at improving their work in a post-COVID world. Dr. Sweeney comments on the need to build a culture of innovation that...
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Outdated work from home policies bog down Aussie businesses - Computer Reseller News - 6 April 2020

IBRS analyst Dr. Joseph Sweeney provides best practice-advice on working from home in the current pandemic situation. Dr. Joseph Sweeney discusses current working from home policies which are...
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Centrelink crashes under demand for crisis payments - Australian Financial Review - 23 march 2020

IBRS workforce transformation advisor Joseph Sweeney said many government departments had to navigate difficult IT environments that were only part-way through their digital transformations, with...
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Inside EY's security work at ANZ - Australian Financial Review - 3 March 2020

"There is more security work to go round than there are resources. So I don't think the market is that crowded. It's important to remember that security is not something you buy and then it's done;...
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