Conclusion: There has been a lot of talk about incident response since the new data breach laws came into effect in Australia and Europe. But the laws alone should not be the driving force to having a response plan in place. Having a plan in place means more than talking about a plan, planning a plan and signing off on a plan. Being prepared puts you way ahead of the curve but being truly prepared means testing your incident response plan through drills and tabletop exercises. A drill provides an opportunity to understand realistic outcomes for risk scenarios and apply the lessons learned to your incident response efforts during a crisis.

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Claire Pales

About The Advisor

Claire Pales