The latest

14 December 2020: FireEye announced it had been breached. An extremely comprehensive overview is available from FireEye. This blog post includes timelines, technical recommendations, and IoCs (indicators of compromise). 

FireEye, a company that exists to track and thwart advanced and persistent adversaries, was itself compromised by an advanced and persistent adversary. FireEye was compromised through a product from SolarWinds. 

What now?

There are four main areas worth exploring. 

1) Check your SolarWinds instance(s) 

The FireEye blog post includes instructions for what to look for. Good asset management will be useful in this verification process. One CISO noted they found an unmaintained SolarWinds instance in one of their OT environments. 

A core lesson that many security executives drew from the MobileIron vulnerability (CVE-2020-15505) was that anything an organisation has that is internet facing needs to consistently receive critical patches quickly, even out of cycle. 

This will require a process to identify critical patches, but for the process to actually be executed. Citrix, VPNs, staff home routers (see FF no.02), and now MDMs have all been leveraged this year for compromise. Everything is up for grabs, so logically, anything internet facing needs to be aggressively maintained. This relates to patching but also asset management. 

Further, it's an opportunity to review privilege. Just because a product can do something, doesn't mean it should. Does SolarWinds really need to talk to the Internet? There are technical controls like host firewalls and properly profiled application allow-listing that will significantly frustrate an adversary in this scenario. It’s a great example where a zero trust architecture would make a big difference.

2) Organised crime 

The ACSC has noted that once a vulnerability is disclosed, threat actors can develop an exploit within 48 hours. We've seen this timeline achieved this year, with both F5 and MobileIron vulnerabilities. Now that the advanced and persistent actor has been ejected from FireEye (and hopefully from SolarWinds) it could be a matter of time before organised crime tries to exploit unpatched SolarWinds instances. 

FireEye will recover, and have an even better story to tell. At this early stage it seems that FireEye was the last target compromised by this adversary, and probably compromised for the shortest duration before the adversary was detected and ejected. It sounds like FireEye was targeted as a source for further intel on government agencies.  

I've got no evidence for this, but I wouldn't be surprised if FireEye was the last, trophy, "let's see if we can do this" target. 

3) Supply chain

The critical point about FireEye being breached, is it points to what industry has been saying for years - "it's not if, it's when". What matters after bang (or 'right of bang'), is how the organisation responds and FireEye is giving a master class on how to respond. But FireEye is only able to do this on the back of years of refining their art. 

However, going left of bang will encourage technology and security executives to look at their supply chain. What other products have access to systems, data and privileges that would be a nightmare if you did not have sole occupancy?

What other software has pervasive access like SolarWinds? What protocols are my service providers following when they use tools like SolarWinds on my environment? We cannot boil the ocean but, as Kevin Mandia said at a CISO Lens gathering in 2016, "protect most what matters most". 

4) Cyber insurance

I've not heard anyone talking about cyber insurance regarding this whole hostile campaign. It seems inevitable that public attribution will end up pointing to a particular nation. If this is the case, many insurers will likely point to exclusion clauses that indemnify the insurer from costs incurred through nation-state activity.

If you have cyber insurance, it may be worth getting a position from your insurer on whether you would have been able to make a claim against your policy if your organisation had been compromised.



James Turner

About The Advisor

James Turner

James Turner is an IBRS emeritus Advisor who specialised in cyber security and risk and facilitates the CIO Cyber and Risk Network on behalf of IBRS. James has over a decade of experience as an industry analyst and advisor; researching the cyber security industry in Australia. As an IBRS Advisor, James authored over 100 IBRS Advisory papers, led dozens of executive roundtables, and presented at numerous conferences.