Cyber & Risk

Understanding cyber security has never been as critical as it is today. 

The importance of having cyber security and risk mitigation strategies is now well-embedded in the corporate conscience, with more and more senior executives required to know their exact security posture and how to respond in the event of an incident.

In a complex world where new threat vectors appear almost daily, organisations must be ready. How well prepared are you? 

IBRS can help organisations understand how resilient their systems are, develop incident response plans and get the right policies in place to ensure compliance with the most rigorous of security standards. 

Commonwealth Bank of Australia's technology chief has led calls for increased cooperation among businesses and public sector agencies regarding cyber attacks, following the release of a government report highlighting increasing threats.

The government's peak cyber security agency the Australian Cyber Security Centre (ACSC), released an annual threat report on Wednesday morning, warning that government agencies were being compromised by hackers and that many businesses were too secretive about the threats they were facing.

While security industry insiders said the report did little to provide new information or practical advice about well-known threats, CBA's chief information officer David Whiteing told The Australian Financial Review he viewed it as an important contribution to a nation-wide effort to uplift the awareness of security teams and the general public

The report provided anecdotes about recent assistance that government departments and private sector organisations had needed from The Australian Signals Directorate (ASD) in tackling cyber attacks

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Conclusion: To be effective a cyber security program that controls access to hardware, software and data needs to be comprehensive and include all stakeholders. The challenge for IT and line management is to shape the message to the audience in terms they understand so they take their responsibilities seriously.

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Conclusion: This research note sets out and describes the Security Leadership capability maturity model. In using this model, organisations must be honest about their current level before they can even speculate on the benefits of working towards a higher maturity level. Working towards higher levels of maturity has clear benefits for both IT and the business, as well as business alignment of IT. However, a critical part of the journey will be dealing with any resentment from business units about their experience to date. Security Leadership cannot emerge unless prior bad experiences around service delivery are acknowledged and addressed, because it is a commitment to trust and resilience from the organisation as a team.

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  • Gain valuable insights into how security leaders are positioning cyber-security and risk within their organisations
  • Be able to self-assess how your organisation measures up on the IBRS capability maturity model for security leadership
  • Learn how to position cyber-security so that it is aligned to business priorities 

"This Master Advisory Presentation is designed to guide and stimulate discussion between business and technology groups, and point the way for more detailed activity. It also provides links to further reading to support these follow-up activities." James Turner, Author of the Security Leadership MAP.

For a deeper understanding of how security impacts the way business is done, download your copy now. 

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A security leader understands today’s cyber risks, how these apply to their organisation and market, and has management’s confidence to address these risks responsibly. A security leader guides the organisation through the realities of the new business environment, aligning the organisation’s practices and technologies to its risk appetite, and ensures these controls match and support the organisation’s desire for growth and innovation.

This MAP is designed to guide and stimulate discussion between business and technology groups, and point the way for more detailed activity. It also provides links to further reading to support these follow-up activities.

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Conclusion: The introduction of Software Defined Networking (SDN) offerings touted a number of benefits around simpler and more agile network management and provisioning, lowering capital and operational costs.

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With the recent issues that the ABS has experienced trying to execute an online census, IBRS is sharing an Advisory Paper by James Turner which reviews a practical framework that helps organisations make better decisions with their information assets and service providers.

Applying the Five Knows of Cyber Security is a must read for organisations that may be exposing themselves to risks through their supply chain.

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IBRS iQ is a database of Client inquiries and is designed to get you talking to our Advisors about these topics in the context of your organisation in order to provide tailored advice for your needs.

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Business leaders must accept that ransomware attacks are a foreseeable risk. 

Conclusion: Ransomware has proven such a successful cash cow for criminals that it is unlikely they will voluntarily stop their attacks. This means that business leaders must accept that further ransomware attacks are a foreseeable risk. While there are important conversations around the level of appropriate technical controls that an organisation may wish to implement, this conversation can only occur after business leaders have decided whether they want their organisation to help fund organised crime, or not. For organisations with a strong corporate social responsibility ethos, this is a very easy decision to make, but it is imperative that business leaders understand why they are committing to better technical hygiene and accepting tighter technical controls.

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Conclusion: IT executives in financial services organisations have expressed frustration at the seemingly vague requirements of APRA, but this misses the true intention of APRA. APRA is not anti-Cloud, but the regulator insists that financial services organisations consult with APRA so that APRA can gauge the maturity of the proposed plan. This is not a mechanism to forbid Cloud, but rather a sanity check to ensure the stability of the Australian financial market by ensuring that organisations are not abrogating their risk identification and management responsibilities.

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Outside of the big four banks and Telstra, Australia lacks world-class cyber security teams.

by James Turner

A few weeks ago I was fortunate enough to attend the world's largest cyber-security event, RSA Conference, in San Francisco. This year was the 25th anniversary of the conference, and there were 40,000 attendees, and over 500 vendors exhibiting.

My experience at RSAC reflected my experiences at many other international cyber-security gatherings over the years. I have come to the conclusion that Australia has pockets of cyber-security leadership that are world-class, and in some instances, world-leading. But these pockets of capability – almost all at the top end of town – are insufficient for the nation's needs.

In Australia we have a small number of organisations with big cyber-security teams, and established leaders with excellent bench strength in their direct reports. Principally, these pockets of cyber maturity are in the big four banks, and a hothouse of talent that has emerged in Telstra.

Conclusion: Cyber security can be perceived by outsiders as an occult domain. Psychologically, people can respond in many ways to something they do not understand with responses ranging from denial to fear. Consequently, a frequent challenge to better security maturity is inertia, rooted in ignorance. It is imperative that security practitioners break down this barrier by communicating with decision makers in a way that empowers the decision maker. Consequently, valuable conversations about risk and threats can be grounded in conversations about reliability, resilience, safety, assurance and reputation. Security may not need to be mentioned and, in many cases, even raising the label of security can undermine initiatives that had security as an objective.

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Conclusion: As cyber security gains awareness among business leaders, many organisations are undertaking new cyber risk management initiatives. However, these initiatives can be misdirected if business leaders are not clear on why they are doing them. On the journey to improving an organisation’s cyber security maturity, the question “why?” is a powerful tool to test alignment of security to business requirements.

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Conclusion: Organisations must understand that cyber risk is not merely a technical issue that can be delegated to IT but is a business issue that comes hand-in-hand from operating in a modern, online, ecosystem. Until cyber risk is treated as a business risk, we will continue to see organisations fighting a rear-guard action to threats that should have been designed-against through better digital business strategy.

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Conclusion: Unless an organisation has an already strong cyber security capability, or the budget and appetite to progress its maturity very quickly through expanding its headcount and changing business processes, it is unlikely that any security tool purchases will help. Instead, organisations aspiring to improve their cyber security maturity should focus on business alignment through risk driven conversations, and addressing and automating technical hygiene issues.

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Conclusion: Open Data initiatives have been supported by all levels of enterprises, especially government, for a number of years. To date the success stories have not matched the hype.

In many cases local IT departments have been left out of Open Data initiatives.

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Conclusion: The role of a cyber security executive is challenging at the best of times, as they need to continually strike a balance between informing and influencing, without continually alarming. But the context surrounding why an organisation creates a cyber security executive role is critical to the success of cyber risk management. Executive level commitment is required continually to ensure that the cyber security executive’s message and mandate are understood by all. Ultimately, a neutered cyber security executive will result in a fragile organisation with excessive, inappropriate, or inadequate controls. Organisations with controls that are mismatched to their objectives will be easy pickings for both attackers and regulators.

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Conclusion: The challenge with handling threat intelligence is in assessing its relevance to an organisation, determining an appropriate response and then continual execution and reassessment. Consequently, the more comprehensive the threat intelligence service is, the greater the requirement for a customer to have existing, mature cyber security capability. Organisations must understand how they will use a threat intelligence service and what business benefit it will deliver to their organisation.

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Conclusion: The IT industry has hit a breaking point where the artificial grouping of information security and IT has left many organisations vulnerable. Business units have viewed information security as an IT problem, and IT has abdicated responsibility for many aspects of operations that should be viewed as basic hygiene. It is time for organisations that want to establish a reputation of trust with their stakeholders, to view information security very differently. This will require IT to take on more responsibility for security hygiene issues, and for many security practitioners to make the mental shift from technical do-ers to risk communicators. All organisations must know who, internally, is ultimately accountable for cyber-security and that this person is adequately informed, and empowered to execute on this accountability.

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Conclusion: There are two compelling information security reasons for creating a sense of purpose and ownership within an organisation. The first is that a sense of purpose and ownership will empower staff so that they move from responding to basic security hygiene matters, towards pre-empting issues. The second reason is so that organisations look out beyond themselves and work towards a more resilient ecosystem.

This level of resilience maturity is vital and will be driven by leadership and a continuing commitment to talent development. Astute security leaders will use cultural indicators such as engagement and sense of purpose and ownership, as a guide to the ability of the organisation to withstand security incidents.

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Conclusion: Non-IT executives are often reported as being concerned about the prospect of a cyber incident, but as security is not their area of expertise, responsibility for mitigation and preparation is often devolved to IT. This is a mistake, because as much as lack of any security could be devastating, applying the wrong controls to an organisation can be equally debilitating. Security is a response to risk, and it is the ongoing mandate of executives to demonstrate that they are guiding their organisation through foreseeable risks. Consequently, many organisations would benefit from the appointment of an information security officer who is able to translate between IT and the business and ensure that cyber risks are prepared for responsibly.

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This paper explores why IT security in supply chains is an important topic and sets out a model for organisations to review their exposure and then communicate these issues internally, and with suppliers.

The IT dependencies that organisations now have are largely invisible and can be easily taken for granted, much like the infrastructure involved to have electricity or water be provided to a home. And just like electricity and water, when there is an incident in the IT supply chain, the impact can be considerable on the end consumer.

 Security in the supply chain can seem like an overwhelmingly technical topic, and it is a large topic, but it is not insurmountable. An increasing number of security leaders are looking at the supply chain as the ecosystem that their organisations operate in, and are starting to work on securing the resilience of every link in the chain – and this will take time, effort, and collaboration.

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Conclusion: It is undeniable that Cloud services will only become more important to organisations. However, executives must bear in mind that as increasing Cloud adoption meets an onslaught of cyber-attacks, regulators and courts will be looking for evidence that organisations exercised due care in vendor selection and support of information security initiatives. The great challenge is in communicating to non-technical people what are often thought of as merely technical issues. In this shifting market, an approach such as the “Five Knows of Cyber Security” can prove invaluable in shifting a technical conversation to a governance conversation.

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Related Articles:

"Applying The Five Knows of Cyber Security (Video)" IBRS, 2016-08-15 02:39:16

Conclusion: Security leaders know that it is not enough for the security group to do its job; they must be seen to be doing their job. This need for communication between security and the business is resulting in organisations creating outreach roles. Many organisations have yet to realise that this communications gap directly impacts their risk management capabilities. While the security team may be executing its work with technical accuracy, it is not serving the true needs of the business. The key to bridging this gap is an outreach function.

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Conclusion: Lockheed Martin’s Cyber Kill Chain framework is a potentially valuable perspective for highly risk averse and highly targeted organisations. Its language is militaristic and technical, which means that it is most suitable for people already inclined to that way of thinking, but in contrast, it may be inappropriate and ineffective with other audiences. Due to its militaristic language, the policy intentions of this framework may be (and have been) reinterpreted by stakeholders, resulting in a misalignment of effort in managing risks.

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Conclusion: travelling executives must be under no illusion that if corporate information on, or accessible via, their electronic devices is of interest to the economic wellbeing of a foreign country, they will be targeted for electronic intrusion. The potential value of the information to a third party will be directly proportional to the effort they may expend in getting it. The more an organisation has at stake, the more important it is that this is a risk-driven conversation, not a technology one, because the technology does not matter if an executive’s behaviour does not alter to match the risk.

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Conclusion: organisations moving traditional enterprise applications into production on AWS will find backup and recovery functional but immature compared to their existing on-premises Enterprise Backup and Recovery (EBR) tools.

Storage administrators need to understand the native backup and recovery methods in AWS and determine how these can be used to meet the business’ recovery objectives. The optimal AWS solution may require adopting new tools and rethinking long-held assumptions.

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Conclusion: as cyber-security becomes a board-level topic, organisations in the A/NZ region are feeling the pinch of the security skills shortage. In this environment, moving IT services to the Cloud has the potential to streamline and/or automate some basic IT security practices. Cloud services are not an IT security silver bullet, but for many organisations, the scale and maturity of some Cloud vendors will be an improvement over their current IT operations.

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Conclusion: Awareness of risks and threats, by itself, is not enough to protect an organisation. Security awareness campaigns are a sustained attempt at behaviour modification. But behaviour modification works best when an individual is not resisting the change. This means that the first step for any security awareness campaign must be to assess employee engagement. If employee engagement is low, this must be addressed before a security awareness campaign can be effective.

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Conclusion: As much as the industry should not blame the victims of cyberattacks, the industry must also learn from these crimes. There are important lessons that must be drawn out from these breaches, because most organisations would be equally vulnerable to similar attacks. Three key lessons are: look for indicators of compromise and be sufficiently resourced to respond, review exposure through third parties and, consider compliance to security standards as a bare minimum for required effort.

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Conclusion: When considering using cyber-insurance to deal with the potential costs associated with a successful attack, there are important considerations that CIOs and CISOs should be highlighting to operational risk and finance executives. Most organisations will need to raise their risk maturity substantially, and this means investment as well as changes to practices, before they are in a position to be able to take advantage of cyber-insurance.

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Conclusion: There are a number of traits and behaviours to look for in an effective security leader, which are different from a traditional IT leader. The measure of an effective CISO is not whether their organisation has had a breach, or not. The measures of an effective CISO are the types of incidents their organisation has, and how their organisation responds to these. Consequently, an effective CISO is a requisite component for comprehensive risk management and organisational resilience.

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Conclusion: Security leaders should approach security frameworks as a challenge to how the organisation secures its information assets. So, security leaders should be able to defend adherence, or variation, from any point on a chosen framework. Variance may be critical for business function, but the security leader needs to know this and be able to articulate it. This is not an argument for non-compliance, but toward a deep understanding of business requirements – and being able to defend this position to internal and external auditors.

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Conclusion: Organisations must ensure they have taken reasonable steps to not release IT equipment which contains information assets. Leading software options for wiping data will be more than adequate for most organisations, and physically destroying disks is both excessively costly and environmentally unfriendly. However, as important as ensuring that sensitive data is destroyed, it is equally important that the organisation has an audit trail to demonstrate that the data destruction policy has been followed. The more sensitive the information is, the greater the need for the assurance of an audit trail.

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Mandatory data breach disclosure is exactly what it says: legislation that obliges an organisation to reveal that it has experienced a data breach and lost control of its customers’ personally identifying and/or sensitive information. The industry buzz really started in 2003 with California Senate Bill 1386 which obliged organisations to inform their customers if there was, or reasonably believed to have been, a compromise in the confidentiality of the customers’ data (which meant “lost” + “unencrypted”).  

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Conclusion: Cyber-insurance will be an inevitability for all organisations. However, executives should be clear on what level of cover they are buying, what incidents they are getting cover for, and the costs and impacts on the organisation that insurance cannot (or may not) cover.

An exploration into the feasibility of cyber-insurance is likely to raise good questions about whether an organisation has sufficient controls in place, as well as to what degree the organisation is willing to self-insure. But these questions, like the purchase of cyber-insurance, can only be addressed by the business.

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Conclusion: The deadline for compliance with the Privacy Act passed in March, yet some organisations have not yet started reviewing their level of non-compliance. More mature organisations have been proactive and, in projects driven by the business, have reviewed and addressed areas of non-compliance. Some of these projects are still underway. These proactive organisations have the view that the cost of ensuring compliance is outweighed by the potential damage to the organisation’s reputation in the event of a publicly disclosed privacy breach where the organisation is found to be at fault.

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Conclusion: IT executives from Australia’s largest organisations are actively looking for ways to create cyber-resilience, not just in their organisations, but also in the ecosystem their organisations operate in. These executives are acknowledging that it is not enough for an organisation to survive, if the community they operate in is crippled. IT security executives are concerned that in the event of a severe attack the current, disparate, communications channels between private sector and government will not be effective. There is a need for a coordinated, national, response to a severe cyber-attack; and that everyone in the information security community knows what this response is

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Conclusion: Many IT executives are still unclear as to their obligations under the amended Privacy Act. IT executives should use the Privacy Act as an opportunity to start transitioning into a technical advisor role for their organisation. They should avoid falling into the trap of trying to unravel the Act from a legal perspective. It is paramount that the business understands that while IT can take leadership on a project for compliance with the Privacy Act, compliance is a business obligation and not an IT problem.

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Conclusion: The probability of an inside attack is hard to gauge and depends entirely on the inner state of the attacker, but the impact can range from inconsequential to disproportionately vast. CIOs must assess the risk of a malicious insider in the context of their organisation’s information assets and risk management priorities. Astute CIOs will know that technology alone will not mitigate this risk, and that an ongoing

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