Google

The Latest

22 October 2021: Google’s latest digital solutions, product features and partnerships were unveiled at Google Cloud Next ’21. In this three-day event, Google and Alphabet chief Sundar Pichai and Google Cloud CEO Thomas Kurian led the keynote sessions on Google Cloud’s improved customer ecosystem and security capabilities.

Possibly the most significant announcement at the event was around Google Distributed Cloud. The Google Distributed Cloud (GDC) platform allows deployment of Cloud-native architecture to private data centres. GDC Edge provides capabilities to run applications at the ‘far edge’ of organisations - IoT devices, AI enabled devices, and so on - via low-latency LTE, radio access network (RAN) networks, and newer 5G Core network technology.

Google Distributed Cloud does not require enterprises to connect to Google Cloud when using their APIs or managing network infrastructure. This is important for organisations (e.g. public sector, finance, health) needing to retain on-premises deployment for tighter control over security and compliance.

Why it’s Important

With GDC, all the top three hyperscale Cloud vendors now have options to run applications developed for public Cloud across private and semi-private infrastructure. Furthermore, all three vendors have approaches to ‘edge’ computing. This is a natural evolution of the operational practices, automation and management software, software defined networking and hyper-converged infrastructure (HCI) that sees the Cloud seeping back into all areas of ICT. As this trend continues, and the lines between where ‘Cloud infrastructure’ sits, organisations will need to make decisions on the key automation and management platforms they will adopt across Clouds.

More organisations have started looking for better solutions to place their Cloud resources anywhere and in any geolocation. This offers considerable reductions in latency by eliminating the distance between users and their content to ensure highly available data while keeping costs low.

Who’s impacted

  • CIO
  • Development team leads
  • Business analysts

What’s Next?

All the hyperscale Cloud vendors are offering this type of flexibility and they are strongly expected to improve over time. It will further drive hyper converged infrastructure (HCI) investments driven by the demand for cost-effective scalable storage with strong durability and availability guarantee.

Related IBRS Advisory

The Latest

22 October 2021: At Google Cloud Next ’21, Google announced the general availability of a PostgreSQL interface to its hyperscale, global spanning Spanner relational database. In short, this means that organisations that have applications that are compatible with PostgreSQL can now migrate to a highly elastic database that is significantly less costly, more robust than running PostgreSQL instances on virtual machines.

Why it’s Important

Google’s highly scalable Cloud relational Spanner database provides high-velocity transactions, strong consistency, and horizontal partitioning across global deployments. Like other specialised, serverless Cloud databases, Spanner previously required legacy (on-premises) applications’ data access layers to be reworked. 

The addition of a PostgreSQL interface greatly reduces development teams’ workload for migrating applications to Spanner. This has several knock-on impacts when migrating applications to the Cloud, including: 

  • reducing training  / new skills development, and allowing existing skills to be fully leveraged
  • reducing the vector for new bugs to be introduced
  • simplifies testing

Overall, this significantly lowers the cost and risk of moving an app to the Cloud. 

As always, the devil is in the detail. Cloud Spanner Product Manager, Justin Makeig posted that the platform does not yet have universal compatibility for all PostgreSQL features, since the company’s goal was to focus on portability and familiarity. However, IBRS has determined that even with the current level of functionality, the PostgreSQL interface for Spanner presents good value for teams looking to migrate legacy applications to the Cloud.

Google is not the only hyperscale Cloud vendor that has enabled this type of operability. However, Cloud Spanner is more economical than competitive hyperscale Cloud database products at this time.

Who’s impacted

  • Development team leads
  • Cloud architecture teams

What’s Next?

Google announced that it is planning to expand its Spanner integration to additional database standards. Data portability and migration of legacy applications to hyperscale Cloud is now a focus for many ICT groups. The availability of open standard SQL interfaces to database PaaS (platform-as-a-Service)  is expected to be a trend for application and data migration, especially where the applications are complex.

Related IBRS Advisory

  1. VENDORiQ: Google introduces Database Migration Service
  2. Enterprise resource planning (ERP) Part 5: Will automation of S/4HANA data migration make modernisation

The Latest

22 October 2021: Google introduced the Work Safer program at the Google Cloud Next ’21 event. The new program includes the Google Workspace suite of products, and adds several third party cyber security services for endpoint security and access to legacy solutions. In addition, Google unveiled upgraded devices, including new Chromebooks from HP.   

A new in-house Google Cyber security Action Team was also introduced in the event. The group will take the lead in developing cyber security and digital products by leveraging the capabilities of the Work Safer program and developing training and policy materials..

Interestingly, Google is offering a whopping 50% discount for the term of the initial contact for all products (its own and third parties) within the Work Safer program.

Why it’s Important

The aim of the Work Safer program is to reinvigorate interest in the Google Workspace ecosystem.  

Microsoft continues to have a near monopoly on the office productivity space, and is using that position to drive organisations towards its Azure Cloud ecosystem and its security ecosystem. Microsoft’s strength is its breadth of services, support for legacy solutions and resistance to change by both desktop teams and office staff.  Creating sufficient impetus for change to a light-touch, collaborative environment of the magnitude Google proposes is hard.

Google Workspaces has a far smaller attack vector compared to Microsoft. Its architecture has been firmly rooted in zero trust since its inception - from the devices all the way to the apps, storage and access controls. However, organisations that have not yet gone down the Google path retain a significant array of existing network investments, legacy solutions, mixed access controls and identity management, devices and so on. To meet these clients' needs, Google has partnered with CrowdStrike and Palo Alto Networks to come up with endpoint protection and threat detection solutions. The partnerships should not be viewed as “Google is backfilling weaknesses in its ecosystem” (which is something we expect to hear from Google’s competitors soon. Instead, these partnerships should be viewed as Google recognising its ecosystem will need to sit alongside ecosystems based on architectures that were conceived several decades ago and retain complexities that need to be addressed.

With more businesses shifting to a remote or hybrid work setup, the risks of ransomware attacks through phishing campaigns, malware infections and data leaks pose a threat to these companies’ data security practices. As such, Google easily benefits from its product’s value proposition already being consumed.   

Therefore, it would appear that Google’s messaging is on point. 

However, from roundtable discussions with digital workspace teams held this month, IBRS has confirmed that Australian organisations’ ICT groups and senior executives continue to resist a major step-change in the office productivity and device space. Rather, most organisations continue to look for ways to extract more value from their existing Microsoft contracts, increasingly looking to expand their investments into Microsoft’s E5 security offerings.  

In short, Google’s challenge is not convincing organisations they have a better, leaner security model. It is not even being less costly than Microsoft.  

It is literally resistance to change.

Who’s impacted

  • CIO
  • Development team leads
  • Business analysts

What’s Next?

Even if an organisation is unlikely to switch to Google Workspace, it is beneficial to review Google’s architecture and which aspects can be applied to the existing architecture.

Organisations should also consider running Google Workspaces experiments with groups of remote / hybrid workers that have less connection with legacy solutions.

Related IBRS Advisory

  1. Deciding between Google G Suite and Microsoft Office 365
  2. Considering Chromebooks Part 1: Show me the money!
  3. Chrome OS: Follow the money

The Latest

27 July 2021: During Google Cloud Platform’s (GCP) analyst update, the vendor unveiled details regarding its Australian expansion with a new Melbourne data centre and new management for the ANZ region. 

Why it’s Important

The new data centre is more an indication of overall Cloud growth in Australia, as IBRS has reported in the past. It is less a turning point in Google’s strategy, and more of a necessary response to market trends. It should be noted that a large set of GCP services will be available from the Melbourne zone, but not all. Others will be added ‘based on market demands’. This is a strategy that has been adopted by all three hyper-scale Cloud vendors, and is a clear indication of how Cloud usage is expanding in Australia: from core infrastructure services (especially storage, compute, containers and analytics) to more nuanced services, such as AI.

During the briefing, Google highlighted its private ANZ wide data network as a key differentiating factor. There is merit to this claim, as network infrastructure in Australia remains a thorny issue for Cloud clients outside the major States, such as Perth and Darwin, Adelaide, etc.

More telling was what was not elaborated upon during the briefing. In the past, Google has focused on its capabilities in AI as a key differentiator in the market. While Google clearly has strong credentials in AI, the reality is that most Australian organisations are not investing in AI directly, but rather obtaining it as part of other solutions. 

For example, AI is found in capabilities of CRM products Salesforce (Einstein) and Zoho (Zia), in low-code products from Appian and Microsoft’s Power Platform and so on.  

Instead, Google championed its partner program and its support credentials. Google knows channel partners are essential to competing against AWS and Microsoft. It also recognises that skills are in short supply, so is investing in training and support programs. 

In reality, Google’s strongest competitive weapon is an age-old one: value for money. When evaluating like-for-like core compute and storage services, GCP is more economical than its two top rivals.

Who’s impacted

  • CIO
  • Cloud infrastructure teams

What’s Next?

Most organisations will end up with a multi-Cloud environment, though with a preference for a ‘primary’ platform. Many Cloud migration strategies IBRS reviews are scoped in such a way to limit the choice of deployment to Azure and/or AWS. Given the strengths of these two Clouds, this makes sense. Oracle’s Cloud platform is also appealing to Oracle customers looking for an ‘easy’ migration of their core services. 

Far fewer Australian organisations are formally considering GCP as a viable alternative for running core workloads, or even leveraging it for failover/parallel workloads. This is a lost opportunity. While IBRS is not recommending GCP, it considers that the vendor is under-represented in shortlists and as a result, opportunities for Cloud cost optimisation and contestability in multi-Cloud environments suffer. 

Related IBRS Advisory

  1. IBRSiQ: Google Cloud - Are Their AI Offerings a Point of Difference From Other Vendors?
  2. Vendor Lock-in Using Cloud: Golden Handcuffs or Ball and Chain?
  3. Options for Machine Learning-as-a-Service: The Big Four AIs Battle it Out
  4. How to get on top of Cloud billing
  5. Why Cloud Certified People Are in Hot Demand
  6. VENDORiQ: Data Replication Goes Serverless with Google Datastream

IBRSiQ is a database of Client inquiries and is designed to get you talking to our advisors about these topics in the context of your organisation in order to provide tailored advice for your needs.