Networking

The Latest

24 June 2021: Samsung Networks, which was launched early in 2021, has struck a deal with infrastructure supplier PLUS ES to support the deployment of Samsung’s 5G technologies. Given activities from other 5G vendors, it is clear that the 5G rollout in Australia will only accelerate.

Why it’s Important

5G will impact both consumer and business applications, as well as hybrid working. It is not just a matter of speed. With greater bandwidth and different cost points, new services become possible. For example: chatbots passing not to a human agent using text, but a human agent on video. These service delivery innovations need to be tested in terms of how the public will accept them, the operational and staffing changes needed to support them, and finally the IT issues and architecture they will raise (including what to do with all the new data coming in)!

CTOs and innovation teams in organisations with public-facing services need to be experimenting and testing new service delivery options and ideas now, since such services are likely to give a competitive advantage.

Who’s impacted

  • CIO
  • Development team leads
  • Business analysts

What’s Next?

If not already established, form a temporary committee to brainstorm the potential for 5G on:

  • Service delivery
  • Field operations and staff
  • Business processes, both internal and external, and how these can be digitised ‘into the field’
  • Hybrid working

Related IBRS Advisory

  1. 5G potential to deliver economic upsides
  2. Samsung unveils new smartphones
  3. Telecommunications reborn
  4. Redefining what ruggedised means

The Latest

9 March 2021: The Australian Defence Department has inked a deal with Fujitsu, Leido and KBR to blitz its ageing network and end-user computing environment in a program of work thought to be worth around AU$200 million.

Why it’s Important

Fujitsu is not the first vendor that comes to mind when thinking about end-user computing overhauls. However, in the world of highly secure workplaces, vendors such as Fujitsu and Unisys have unique offerings and experiences. Even if not using these vendor’s capabilities, the critical components of the security architecture are worth noting by organisations that need to protect information assets with an increasingly mobile or distributed workforce. 

Who’s impacted

  • End-user computing / digital workspace architects
  • Security teams

What’s Next?

With remote working no longer a choice, but a business continuity issue, organisations need to rethink traditional approaches to securing information assets and people when planning for the next upgrade of end-user computing. Identity management, contextual access control and encryption of information assets are three essential pillars of a modern, secure digital workspace. Building upon these pillars, organisations can look towards zero trust approaches and adopt emerging new techniques for detecting issues and protecting the organisation, such as embodied in products for user, entity and behavioural analytics (UEBA).

Related IBRS Advisory

  1. Architecting identity and access management
  2. Embracing security evolution with zero trust networking
  3. Trends for 2021-2026: No new normal and preparing for the fourth-wave of ICT