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29 April 2021: Microsoft briefed analysts on its expansion of Azure data centres throughout Asia. By the end of 2021, Microsoft will have multiple availability zones in every market where it has a data centre.

The expansion is driven in part by a need for additional Cloud capacity to meet greenfield growth. Each new availability zone is, in effect, an additional data centre of Cloud services capability.

However, the true focus is on providing existing Azure clients with expanded options for deploying services over multiple zones within a country.  

Microsoft expects to see strong growth in organisations re-architecting solutions that had been deployed to the Cloud through a simple ‘lift and shift’ approach to take advantage of the resilience granted by multiple zones. Of course, there is a corresponding uplift in revenue for Microsoft as more clients take up multiple availability zones.

Why it’s Important

While there is an argument that moving workloads to Cloud services, such as Azure, has the potential to improve service levels and availability, the reality is that Cloud data centres do fail. Both AWS and Microsoft Azure have seen outages in their Sydney Australia data centres. What history shows is organisations that had adopted a multiple availability zone architecture tended to have minimal, if any, operational impact when a Cloud data centre goes down.

It is clear that a multiple availability zone approach is essential for any mission critical application in the Cloud. However, such applications are often geographically bound by compliance or legislative requirements. By adding additional availability zones within countries throughout the region, Microsoft is removing a barrier for migrating critical applications to the Cloud, as well as driving more revenue from existing clients.

Who’s impacted

  • Cloud architecture teams
  • Cloud cost / procurement teams

What’s Next?

Multiple available zone architecture can be considered on the basis of future business resilience in the Cloud. It is not the same thing as ‘a hot disaster recovery site’ and should be viewed as a foundational design consideration for Cloud migrations.

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