End User Computing

Conclusion:

Chargeback of enterprise-wide ICT costs were developed to assign ICT costs to the point of usage. The outcome is twofold; it ensures the initial allocation of ICT assets and services are identifiable, and it enables reallocation of underutilised or unnecessary services. This relies on IT creating assets and services which are commodified and transferable.

A chargeback arrangement can increase tension between ICT and the department managers. Allocating all ICT costs to achieve a zero-sum IT department can exacerbate that tension. Making IT fully responsible and accountable for IT costs can create insular behaviours which stifle innovation and investments in new IT services for departments. Departments will feel entitled to explore ICT improvements without an effective relationship with IT. Creating a chargeback governance model that manages disputes and builds trust in the process is preferable.

Conclusion:

Virtual Desktop Infrastructure (VDI) implementation involves identifying whether VDI can be done internally or outsourced through a third party, seeking out and engaging a supplier, and finally, determining the cost-effective and efficient way to deploy the service.

The Latest

28 June 2021: After a leak of an early pre-release version of Windows, Microsoft formally announced Windows 11 and have followed up with a series of posts, most aimed at promoting the new user experience of the operating system. A quick look on YouTube will find dozens of reviews and tests of the pre-release version of Windows 11, and from early tests, it appears as if there is little performance impact for the OS. Reviews of Microsoft’s documentation suggest that there is no significant change to how Windows 11 can be deployed. The bulk of the changes appear to be related to how Microsoft’s Office 365 products are put front and centre within the desktop experience. Teams, in particular, takes centre stage. As with the release of Windows 10, Windows 11 will start by building new expectations among consumers, which will in turn drive staff to demand the new environment from their ICT groups. In this sense, the key issues for ICT look to be identical to those faced in 2015.

Why it’s Important

While Microsoft executives famously touted that Windows 10 would be the last Windows, a clear reference to enterprises’ frustrations with continued hardware/software refresh treadmill and the expense of upgrading fleets of desktops en-mass, the statement was never officially enshrined in the product lifecycle. This means that enterprises, at least for the foreseeable future, will need to plan for generational shifts in desktop upgrades, complete with the demands of change management and the potential bulk hardware refreshes.  

The common driver for most organisations looking to refresh their desktop environment (device management, security, application deployment and change management), is to ‘flatten the investment’ needed to keep users up to date. From a device asset management perspective, the goal is to move away from four-to-five year bulk buys and move to a rolling schedule of device refreshes. For software deployment, it's a move to a self-service model. And for the OS, it's a move to a gradually updated, evolving platform.  

All the above have become critical enablers of hybrid working and by extension business continuity. 

Microsoft’s Cloud-based approach to deploying devices and software with Autopilot is highly attractive as it supports the new digital workspace model. How best to migrate to Autopilot from the legacy ‘tiered’ desktop management approach is by far the most common question IBRS is asked in relation to digital workspaces.

Microsoft has noted that Windows 11 can be managed using all current tools and processes that are used to manage Windows 10. This means Windows 11 can be managed using the Cloud-based Autopilot approach and the ‘standardised desktop’ approach via SCCM (System Centre Configuration Manager). Third-party tools such as Ivanti are also expected to work without problem. Therefore, based on available information, there appears to be little additional benefit to Windows 11 over Windows 10 when it comes to deployment and management.

This is not to say that Windows 11 will not have other benefits to enterprises, but the (current) benefits appear to be more related to putting Office 365 services forward.

Who’s impacted

  • CIO
  • Desktop / end user computing teams
  • ICT asset management teams
  • CFO / ICT financial planning teams

What’s Next?

Enterprise desktop teams do not need to rush into Windows 11 planning. Device and software compatibility is expected to be high (despite some initial negative assumptions on YouTube). Instead, organisations should continue to focus their efforts on migrating from the standardised desktop management model to the ‘digital workspaces’ model which focuses on offering self-service capabilities and zero-trust security. In addition, adopting an iterative and ongoing approach to Office 365 change management is needed. Moving to the digital workspaces model will not only reap significant operational benefits over the older standardised desktop approach, but will also ensure a smoother transition to Windows 11 before the 2025 end of support deadline.

Related IBRS Advisory

  1. Digital Workspaces Master Advisory Presentation
  2. SNAPSHOT: Workforce Transformation beyond Mobility and Digital Workspaces
  3. How will you deal with Microsoft’s Pester Power strategy for Windows 10?
  4. The journey of Office 365: A guiding framework Part 3: Post-implementation

The Latest

11 May 2021: Jamf is a market leader in Apple iOS device management, with a strong presence in education. It has announced its intention to acquire the zero-trust end-point security vendor Wandera. 

Why it’s Important

Vendors in the device management have two options for continued growth: add new services and grow horizontally within their market (as in VMWare), or specialise in increasingly niche areas. Jamf has remained firmly entrenched in providing Apple device management, so it is a niche (though important) player in device management. Its acquisition of Wandera, hot on the heels of its purchase of Mondad, will broaden its base and help cement its position against the broader players. 

Who’s impacted

  • End user computing/digital workspace teams
  • Security teams

What’s Next?

Globally, the move to working from home saw an uplift in Apple products being connected to enterprise (work) environments. Citing IDC, Jamf reports the penetration of macOS in 2019 was around 17%, and during 2020 this increased to 23%. In addition, globally 49% of smartphones connecting to work environments remain iOS, though this is slightly lower in Australia, where Android has gained small market share in a tight market last year. 

The challenge with supporting a mixed device ecosystem (Windows, Android, macOS, iOS, Chrome) is now more than just securing the end-point, but the entire information ecosystem. VPNs in particular proved difficult to scale and adapt to a myriad of end points. The need to patch reliability and manage software also becomes significantly difficult due to differing rates of change, patch cycles and tools needed. 

Jamf’s acquisition of Wandera will not eliminate these challenges completely, but will at least simplify the Apple slice of the situation. 

Related IBRS Advisory

  1. Requirements Check-List for Mobile Device Management Solutions
  2. Embracing security evolution with zero trust networking

Conclusion

The COVID-19 pandemic has, in many cases, forced the workforce environment to shrink to the walls of worker’s houses for at least nine months. While some services such as shopping, online learning and telemedicine proved to be useful when made available remotely, many other services were not suitable to run effectively outside the traditional work environment (e. g. those with inadequate network capacity). Organisations should study the feasibility and cost-effectiveness of deploying additional remote services that are critical to improve business performance, increase service efficiency and reduce the cost of doing business.

Conclusion

Virtual desktop infrastructure (VDI) is suitable for addressing a range of business challenges. As VDI has evolved over the past decade, understanding of use-cases for where is best applied has also matured. In this paper, we explore the use-cases where VDI has been most successful.

The Latest

9 March 2021: The Australian Defence Department has inked a deal with Fujitsu, Leido and KBR to blitz its ageing network and end-user computing environment in a program of work thought to be worth around AU$200 million.

Why it’s Important

Fujitsu is not the first vendor that comes to mind when thinking about end-user computing overhauls. However, in the world of highly secure workplaces, vendors such as Fujitsu and Unisys have unique offerings and experiences. Even if not using these vendor’s capabilities, the critical components of the security architecture are worth noting by organisations that need to protect information assets with an increasingly mobile or distributed workforce. 

Who’s impacted

  • End-user computing / digital workspace architects
  • Security teams

What’s Next?

With remote working no longer a choice, but a business continuity issue, organisations need to rethink traditional approaches to securing information assets and people when planning for the next upgrade of end-user computing. Identity management, contextual access control and encryption of information assets are three essential pillars of a modern, secure digital workspace. Building upon these pillars, organisations can look towards zero trust approaches and adopt emerging new techniques for detecting issues and protecting the organisation, such as embodied in products for user, entity and behavioural analytics (UEBA).

Related IBRS Advisory

  1. Architecting identity and access management
  2. Embracing security evolution with zero trust networking
  3. Trends for 2021-2026: No new normal and preparing for the fourth-wave of ICT

The Latest

17 February 2021: At the Learning with Google global event, the Cloud giant announced a slew of new education-oriented features for its education productivity suite. Previously called G Suite for Education, the Google Workspace for Education is now being aggressively commercialised.  

What’s included

The free tier service - now called Google Workspaces for Education Fundamentals, had found strong acceptance in Australia by providing educators and students with collaborative learning capabilities. 

This free tier now has three paid tiers, each with increasing levels of security and manageability. 

  • Standard: Adds security and analytics capabilities. The new features are aimed at improving traceability and providing more nuanced access rights to information.
  • Teaching and Learning Upgrade: Adds features to better manage the classroom experience.
  • Education Plus: Combines all the features of the previous tiers, in addition to extra management capabilities. 

In addition, Google increased the baseline storage capacity for educational institutions to a whopping 100 TB, and added online-learning features to Google Meet.

Why it’s Important

Google and Microsoft are locked in a fierce battle for ‘hearts and minds’ in education. Both vendors know that student’s experiences with their productivity platforms today, will set expectations and habits for the workforce of tomorrow. This battle extends beyond the productivity suite to device, operating systems and ultimately, the entire digital workspace.

By introducing features that have been much in demand by education (especially K12) into commercial tiers, Google is fundamentally changing its stance in this war. In most State K12 and private education systems, Principals have the final say on the extent to which Google or Microsoft is used in classrooms. Often the decision is delegated down to the teachers and often both vendor’s offerings sit side by side.

Google’s evolving commercial stance means that this can no longer be the case. Given the total national cost (as ultimate schools are funded through State and Federal funds) educational policy setters now need to consider taking a side in the battle. 

Who’s impacted

  • Educational policy makers
  • CIOs
  • Educational ICT strategy leads 
  • Principals and senior leadership of higher education institutions
  • Digital workspace teams

What’s Next?

Stakeholders within education need to immediately begin the laborious task of evaluating Google’s and Microsoft’s offerings, not just from the perspective of current offerings, but from their likely future directions. While the need to rationalise to one platform today may not be a burning priority, the need will increase over the next decade.

Stakeholders outside of education should monitor the decisions of education networks, as the platforms they select will impact new staff expectations and work habits. 

Related IBRS Advisory

  1. Dr Sweeney on the Post-COVID Lessons for Education (Video Interview)
  2. Kids, Education and The Future of Work with Dr Joseph Sweeney - Potential Psychology - 25 July 2018
  3. Higher Education Technology Future State Vision
  4. BYOD in Education: A report for Australia and New Zealand