Mike Mitchelmore

Mike Mitchelmore

Mike Mitchelmore is an IBRS advisor specialising in the areas of ICT strategy, program and project management, ICT service delivery and telecommunications. Mike has more than 40 years of experience in the ICT industry during which he has successfully led engagements in the design and deployment of a global telecommunications networks and IT platforms, negotiated managed telecommunications services, introduced new capabilities for call centres and consolidated ICT systems to focus on service delivery for citizen facing services. Mike has also assisted clients in ICT strategy, support planning, system design and architecture, and procurement strategies. Mike is a graduate of the Australian Army Command and Staff College, and the Royal Military College of Science (UK). He holds a degree in Social Science (human resource development), and graduate diplomas in Management Studies and Telecommunications Systems Management. Mike is a certified PRINCE 2 Practitioner and an ITIL (V2) Manager.

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IBRSiQ is a database of client inquiries and is designed to get you talking to our advisors about these topics in the context of your organisation in order to provide tailored advice for your needs.


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Conclusion:

The challenges of delivering good IT in the modern marketplace1 has resulted in a shortage of key skills in the market, greater mobility in the workforce between employers, and an environment where the cost of sufficient IT servicing is unaffordable for many. Permanent employees are hard to retain, and investment in skills uplift of staff can be seen as a risk. Organisations are finding it harder to recruit and retain the right skills, not only for resourcing of projects, but also for resources needed to support business as usual.

The 2022 workforce market has resulted in many organisations reassessing how they recruit, manage, and remunerate their workforce. The concept of an organisation developing a workforce plan based on a permanent workforce for business as usual, with contract resources for surge capability to run projects, seems to no longer work. Do organisations need to pay above the market to attract skills, or is there an option to change how skills are acquired such that productivity, not the hourly rate, is key.


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Is your organisation losing focus on getting project management right? With so much discussion around Agile and Waterfall - how does agile impact the project management framework for your organisation? And what is the difference between project program and portfolio maturity anyway?

We wrap up the advisory series on Programme and Project Maturity with a webinar and ebook. IBRS advisor Michael Mitchelmore takes us through how to establish a successful project culture. View the full webinar, access the ebook, and download the webinar slide deck.


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Conclusion: This advisory is the fourth in a series which discusses the value proposition for conduct of project assurance through gate reviews for high-value projects, health checks of projects in trouble, key processes, and control mechanisms. Included in the first three parts of this advisory series was a discussion on the need for maturity in project management, the need for a mature project management framework, and a mature project management office (PMO) to support success in completion of projects.

Without effective project assurance, through external review of high-value projects at key gateways in the life of each project, and health checks of processes and controls, organisations run the risk of not fully understanding the impact of the project’s progress on their business objectives.


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Conclusion:

This advisory is the third in a series which discusses the value proposition for the project and/or programme management office (PMO). In the first and second parts of this advisory series, we discussed the need for maturity in project management and the need for a mature project management framework (PMF) to support success in the completion of projects.

Effective project management requires an effective PMO to achieve the controls necessary to manage the processes within the PMF, and to ensure the delivery of each business outcome is prioritised to meet the desired business objectives.

Without an effective PMO, your organisation’s ability to track business performance against delivery of new or enhanced capabilities being delivered by projects will be limited or potentially catastrophic.


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Conclusion:

This advisory, as the second in the series, will address the necessary inclusions in your project management framework (PMF) and the value of developing a community of practice (COP) to ensure continuous improvement. In addition to these foundation stones of good project management, IBRS takes a pragmatic view of how the choice of methodology used for each project impacts the organisation’s approach to its PMF and the value proposition of the COP.

The key to predictable outcomes is to make sure the processes and products of your PMF are of value to both those executing the project and those overseeing the development of each capability. Too often, poor take up of an organisation’s PMF, and the subsequent increased risk of failure of a project is a result of a bureaucratic and overly complex framework. The keep it simple principle is essential so that compliance with the PMF can become routine.

Likewise, the COP is key to learning, improvement, and ownership by those involved in your organisation’s capability development and project management. An effective COP will look to improve skills, apply lessons learned, and improve the PMF processes, outputs, and tools.


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Conclusion: This advisory will be presented as a series of five instalments, culminating in a Webinar. This first instalment will focus on an introduction to key concepts in project, programme and portfolio maturity. The next instalments will address:

  • the necessary inclusions in your project management framework (PMF) and the value of developing a community of practice (COP) to ensure continuous improvement,
  • a discussion on the value proposition for the project and/or programme management office (PMO), and
  • a discussion on the value of project assurance.

The final instalment will be a Webinar, which will both present the findings from the three instalments and provide an opportunity for subscribers to question the findings.

The ability to provide consistency in the management of projects and programmes is a reflection of the organisation’s maturity. Whether your organisation runs waterfall, agile or a mix of both, the need for effective project and programme management processes and effective governance is essential for success.

Organisations that are not mature in their approach to projects often find themselves in difficulty resulting from inconsistency in application of management practices, reliance on individuals that represent single points of failure, and ineffective governance that is unable to meet its responsibilities.


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Conclusion: One of the immediate effects of the COVID-19 pandemic was the closure of offices and the move to remote working conditions. Some businesses were able to immediately execute this as part of their business continuity plan (BCP). Now that the crisis has become the business-as-usual state, challenges have also begun to appear and BCPs need revising to adapt to this new situation.

The employer’s ability to provide the right set of tools goes back to technology and infrastructure investments made prior to the crisis. With a huge percentage of the population online, not just businesses but also schools, government agencies, and communities, there may be a need to update systems and invest in more infrastructure. However, it will not be as easy as purchasing products. It requires understanding workforce behaviour, emerging needs, and trends. As with any change, it will be crucial to maintain organisational culture and connection.


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Disaster Recovery (DR) planning is much more than just developing a DR plan. Building your organisation’s maturity to successfully recover from a disaster scenario is an exercise in continuous improvement. Recently, IBRS hosted a webinar to address four IBRS advisory papers focusing on the steps needed to successfully plan for DR and build the maturity of the organisations DR planning processes. The end game; to improve the likelihood of mitigating an ICT disaster event to ensure business success. Disaster Recovery Must Work!


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When your business faces a disaster it is key to address the issue head on. You must first understand who's problem it is to solve and create an effective disaster recovery (DR) plan. Both business and ICT need to be comfortable that the DR plan has been verified to ensure a reasonable expectation that recovery will be successful. IBRS has created a 4 part series to help organisations plan for and recover from disasters successfully. Download the 'disaster recovery must work ebook' and prepare your organisation.


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Conclusion:

In the modern business landscape, ICT products and services are becoming more and more critical to the success of the business. It is now more common than not that ICT products and services are being delivered through outsourcing of some kind, using Software-as-a Service (SaaS) or Cloud service providers (CSPs). Innovating improvements to the business can become a challenge when your organisation is tied to delivery of ICT services under contract; most very specific in nature but key to delivering success.

The key to successful innovation is situational awareness across both the business and the ICT environment. The result of being able to achieve situational awareness will enable both business units and ICT to innovate with their eyes wide open to both the opportunities and constraints impacting the business. The true cost and time to market the innovation presents, can then be clearly understood against the benefits envisaged.


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IBRSiQ is a database of Client inquiries and is designed to get you talking to our advisors about these topics in the context of your organisation in order to provide tailored advice for your needs.


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Conclusion:

Part four in this series of advisories looks at how to improve the disaster recovery (DR) planning maturity of your organisation. The focus of improving maturity in DR planning is to improve your probability of successfully meeting the needs of your business in the event of a disaster. Ensuring your DR plan (DRP) and business continuity planning (BCP) are fully integrated and that all elements of the organisation have a high degree of familiarity with DR processes.

Importantly, your organisation must understand that maturity is both a journey and a target. To maintain the target maturity, your organisation must put in place a number of strategies that will be continually repeated to ensure the target is both met and maintained.


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Conclusion:

Part three of this four part series looks at how the disaster recovery (DR) plan can be verified. The DR plan is in effect a contingency plan to deal with risk of a disaster. The DR test plan is a validation of the preparedness of the organisation to address these risks.

The need to have a DR plan verified is therefore essential if the contingency is to be effective. Just having a plan in place is not enough to mitigate the risk. The plan must be tested and verified as part of business as usual (BAU) to both increase familiarity with the plan, its standard operating procedures (SOPs) and processes, and most importantly, improve the likelihood of success.


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