Mike Mitchelmore

Mike Mitchelmore

Mike Mitchelmore is an IBRS advisor specialising in the areas of ICT strategy, program and project management, ICT service delivery and telecommunications. Mike has more than 40 years of experience in the ICT industry during which he has successfully led engagements in the design and deployment of a global telecommunications networks and IT platforms, negotiated managed telecommunications services, introduced new capabilities for call centres and consolidated ICT systems to focus on service delivery for citizen facing services. Mike has also assisted clients in ICT strategy, support planning, system design and architecture, and procurement strategies. Mike is a graduate of the Australian Army Command and Staff College, and the Royal Military College of Science (UK). He holds a degree in Social Science (human resource development), and graduate diplomas in Management Studies and Telecommunications Systems Management. Mike is a certified PRINCE 2 Practitioner and an ITIL (V2) Manager.

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When your business faces a disaster it is key to address the issue head on. You must first understand who's problem it is to solve and create an effective disaster recovery (DR) plan. Both business and ICT need to be comfortable that the DR plan has been verified to ensure a reasonable expectation that recovery will be successful. IBRS has created a 4 part series to help organisations plan for and recover from disasters successfully. Download the 'disaster recovery must work ebook' and prepare your organisation.


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Conclusion:

In the modern business landscape, ICT products and services are becoming more and more critical to the success of the business. It is now more common than not that ICT products and services are being delivered through outsourcing of some kind, using Software-as-a Service (SaaS) or Cloud service providers (CSPs). Innovating improvements to the business can become a challenge when your organisation is tied to delivery of ICT services under contract; most very specific in nature but key to delivering success.

The key to successful innovation is situational awareness across both the business and the ICT environment. The result of being able to achieve situational awareness will enable both business units and ICT to innovate with their eyes wide open to both the opportunities and constraints impacting the business. The true cost and time to market the innovation presents, can then be clearly understood against the benefits envisaged.


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IBRSiQ is a database of Client inquiries and is designed to get you talking to our advisors about these topics in the context of your organisation in order to provide tailored advice for your needs.


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Conclusion:

Part four in this series of advisories looks at how to improve the disaster recovery (DR) planning maturity of your organisation. The focus of improving maturity in DR planning is to improve your probability of successfully meeting the needs of your business in the event of a disaster. Ensuring your DR plan (DRP) and business continuity planning (BCP) are fully integrated and that all elements of the organisation have a high degree of familiarity with DR processes.

Importantly, your organisation must understand that maturity is both a journey and a target. To maintain the target maturity, your organisation must put in place a number of strategies that will be continually repeated to ensure the target is both met and maintained.


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Conclusion:

Part three of this four part series looks at how the disaster recovery (DR) plan can be verified. The DR plan is in effect a contingency plan to deal with risk of a disaster. The DR test plan is a validation of the preparedness of the organisation to address these risks.

The need to have a DR plan verified is therefore essential if the contingency is to be effective. Just having a plan in place is not enough to mitigate the risk. The plan must be tested and verified as part of business as usual (BAU) to both increase familiarity with the plan, its standard operating procedures (SOPs) and processes, and most importantly, improve the likelihood of success.


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Conclusion:

There is no denying that the incidence and severity of ransomware cyber attacks, both real and fake, are on the rise. Whether the attacks are State-based or purely criminal in nature, organisations need to address their ability to both defend against such attacks and respond appropriately when they occur. The impact of a successful breach can have a high cost in the areas of productivity, reputation and the potential for financial losses. A good defensive posture against cyber attacks will make your organisation a harder nut to crack for the attackers.


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Conclusion: 

The need to have a disaster recovery (DR) plan that is understood, agreed, and jointly owned by all elements of the organisation is essential in preparing for a disaster event. An effective DR plan will focus on managing the risk associated with completing a successful restoration and recovery in a time, and to a level of effectiveness, acceptable to business.

To ensure the plan is effective at mitigating the risks associated with completion of restoration and resumption of services after a disaster event; the DR plan must also clearly identify how the plan is to be verified and therefore reduce the risk of not completing a successful disaster recovery.

The key focus of the DR plan must always be about the restoring delivery of business functions. The technical delivery may be from ICT services on-premise, outsourced providers, or Cloud. Regardless of technical delivery to business, the impact of an ICT disaster event needs a verified plan!


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Conclusion

With the growth of dependence on ICT for business to perform effectively, many organisations have increased risk associated with the ability of ICT to provide service continuity. ICT downtime means business is negatively impacted. Many organisations believe the DRP is a problem that is ICTs to solve. Whilst ICT will lead the planning and do a lot of the heavy lifting when a disaster occurs, it can only be successful with the assistance and collaboration of its business partners. It will be the business that sets the priorities for restoration and accepts the risk.

Both business and ICT need to be comfortable that the disaster recovery (DR) plan has been verified to ensure a reasonable expectation that recovery will be successful.


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Conclusion

Traditionally, vendor lock-in was associated with deliberate vendor-driven outcomes, where software and hardware forced the client to align their business processes to those offered by a specific software or ICT platform. Vendor lock-in often limited the flexibility of organisations to meet business needs as well as increasing costs. As a result, information and communication technology (ICT) was often seen as a limiting factor for business success when agility was needed. Historically, vendor lock-in was therefore seen as a negative. Poor timing, bad decisions and clumsy procurement practices may still see organisations fall into unwanted vendor lock-in situations. But is vendor lock-in always a negative?


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Conclusion:

For many years Chief Information Officers (CIOs) have faced endless questions about whether Microsoft (MS) and other suppliers meet the requirements for an enterprise-grade solution. The main components of the office suite (Word, Excel and PowerPoint) and the Windows operating systems for desktops and servers, has been de facto standards for most organisations for many years.

With Microsoft’s success with Azure (Cloud and infrastructure), Dynamics (enterprise resource planning (ERP)), Office 365 (collaborative workplace platform) and the PowerPlatform (analytics and low-code workflow development), MS is now competitive in almost every aspect of the enterprise solution space. Your organisation’s approach to determining the value proposition for any supplier is the same as it has always been – maximum gain with minimum pain. The MS offering in both terms of capabilities, service support and security has matured significantly and now offers a much-improved value proposition that organisations should consider.


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Conclusion:

COVID-19 has presented a number of challenges for business and the underlying Information and Communication Technology (ICT) in particular. These challenges have presented both as crisis and opportunity but all have been compelling events. To paraphrase Winston Churchill, ‘never let a good crisis go to waste’. In each case, this will only be possible when the lessons learned are properly investigated and documented, allowing evidence-based decisions to ensure organisations improve the way business is done.

The COVID-19 pandemic has resulted in many changes to the way business is done, how employees contribute, and how customers interact. Taking the time to evaluate performance, document the lessons learned, and to improve your business decision processes is invaluable. Applying the technical and business lessons learned from the period of this pandemic will add value for many years to come. It will allow your organisation to reinforce successes, avoid possible errors, and potentially improve its position in the marketplace.


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Conclusion: It is no longer viable for telecommunication providers to simply offer Session Initiation Protocol (SIP) trunks for voice connectivity or Multi-Protocol Label Switching (MPLS) links to connect office and data centre locations. Nor does it make good business sense for the telco or for the customer.

The modern architectures of Cloud and Software-as-a-Service (SaaS), mixed with the need to maintain on-premise for critical elements are key components that support most digital strategies. Using older telecommunications architectures with fixed connections and physical infrastructure for routing and switching can be costly, and can stifle agility and therefore productivity.

However, modern telecommunication architectures bring an ability to virtualise connections and network switching. The abstraction of these capabilities allows dynamic management of the services providing substantial agility, as well as potential productivity gains and cost savings to the customer.


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Conclusion: In today’s marketplace, a successful business needs to position itself strategically to be a leader in the market by either delivering services better and cheaper than the competition, or by disrupting the status quo to deliver services in a different way that empowers the consumer. To achieve this, organisations need to ensure their procurement plans are aligned with the business strategy and, where appropriate, identify in the ICT sphere where procurement is important strategically.

Organisations therefore need to identify the value a supply chain delivers to the business strategy. In doing so, the executive needs to understand the procurement activities that provide an advantage to the business in the marketplace, and which procurements may lead to a broader alliance with the supplier where mutual gain is possible to all parties involved.


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Conclusion: All organisations need to identify the value of their procurement portfolio. That is, to document and regularly review the portfolio to understand both the criticality of the contracts to business and the triggers that decide whether the technology is meeting the need and when actions need to be put in place to limit the risk to the business in the acquisition process.

With an improved situational awareness of the procurement portfolio, organisations then need to ensure alignment with the business strategy. The alignment can only be achieved with regular independent reviews, and by effective governance processes to ensure that the risk associated with procurement planning is contained.


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