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Conclusion: Unless you have a definition of the key data items for your enterprise, you will not be able to manage your data effectively. Astute CIOs have an understanding of the key data items that their organisation relies on for effective decision-making.

An enterprise data model documents the data in your organisation. It is a key enterprise architecture asset that enables more effective data management as well as offering the CIO the ability to reduce duplication and provide a higher level of service to the organisation.

Conclusion: As the market for Board Portals rapidly matures, IT organisations are being asked to assist in selecting and implementing a solution. This is a golden opportunity to raise the IT Organisation’s profile with some of the most influential people in the company.

The CIO must ensure that technical staff do not overcomplicate the project and must find an Executive sponsor who can manage the Board members’ requirements and expectations.

Conclusion: Organisations looking to develop and deploy mobile applications must realise that the mobile device market will undergo significant change over the next five years. This creates serious challenges for developers within enterprises, who must either create applications for specific devices and different form factors, or attempt to develop cross-platform applications that will still meet end-user expectations. IBRS has identified four high-level architectures for developing mobile applications, each of which has specific strengths and weaknesses. This research provides an overview of these architectures.

Related Articles:

"Coping with Mobility - Part 3: aligning generic use cases to application development approaches" IBRS, 2012-04-30 00:00:00

"Coping with Mobility - Part 2: First steps towards a holistic mobility strategy" IBRS, 2012-03-29 00:00:00

"Coping with mobility - part 4: governance" IBRS, 2012-05-31 00:00:00

"Coping with mobility - part 5: developing the strategy" IBRS, 2012-10-28 00:00:00

"Coping with mobility Part 6: Work context" IBRS, 2013-06-26 00:00:00

Conclusion: Pattern-based and repeatable processes, such as gathering operational data, validating data, and assessing data quality, offer potential for automation. The Web and software-as-a-service technologies offer powerful tools that facilitate automation beyond the simple mechanical pumping of data from one system to the next. Operational management tasks that focus on administration and control can and should be automated, so that managers have time to think about the organisation as a system, and can focus on continuous improvement.

Conclusion: The implementation of Business Intelligence is critical to the optimised operation of even the most basic business functions. When executed well it provides quantifiable competitive advantage for private sector organisations, and improved service delivery outcomes for the public sector.

IT has a significant opportunity to enhance its business relevance by ensuring that Business Intelligence best practice is active and transparent across the organisation. Organisations without a comprehensive investment and capability in Business Intelligence will struggle to complete and will operate below their potential.

Conclusion: Does every organisation need a dedicated ECM system? Not necessarily. Given the breadth of the topic, it is common to use a combination of different systems to adequately address enterprise wide management of content. When embarking on an ECM initiative, it is important to set clear priorities, and to explicitly define the limits of scope, otherwise the solution that is developed may primarily be a costly distraction.

Conclusion: SharePoint is well known as a platform for small-scale knowledge management, team collaboration, and Web applications. However, some organisations have begun experimenting with SharePoint as an alternative to large-scale Enterprise Content Management (ECM) solutions, handling more than 100 million documents. The lessons learned from these initiatives indicate that while SharePoint can deliver ECM, such projects require a great many technical and planning skills that are foreign to most SharePoint implementation teams in Australia. It is almost certain you will need to hire short-term project specialists to be successful.

Conclusion: CIOs today are often faced with deciding whether to buy integrated systems solutions and services from major vendors or buy best of breed solutions from multiple vendors and manage the integration project in-house.

Organisations that have engaged external services providers on a major scale and eroded their IT skills base typically find they have no option but to buy the integrated solution. Conversely those with specialist skills in-house and the need to develop their people, often find in-house systems integration solutions more attractive.

Conclusion: Lock-in to software technology always goes hand in hand with lock-in to knowledge. When using Commercial Off-The-Shelf (COTS) software, most of the lock-in relates to elements external to the organisation. In contrast, the use and development of open source software encourages development of tacit knowledge that extends into the public domain. It is time to move beyond the passive consumption of open source software, to remove business-risk inducing restrictions on the flow of knowledge, and to start actively supporting the development of open source software.

Related Articles:

"The Art of Lock-In Part 2" IBRS, 2011-07-26 00:00:00

"The Art of Lock-In; Part 1" IBRS, 2011-06-28 00:00:00

Conclusion: Lock-in is often discussed in relation to external suppliers of products and services. In doing so it is easy to overlook the lock-in relating to internal tacit knowledge and in-house custom software. The opposite of lock-in is not “no lock-in”, it is lock-in to an alternative set of behaviour and structures. Even though organisations can sometimes suffer from an excessive degree of external lock-in, organisations also benefit from lock-in, in the form of reduced costs and risk exposure. The art of lock-in involves continuously monitoring the business environment, and knowing when to switch from external to internal lock-in and vice versa.

Related Articles:

"The Art of Lock-In; Part 1" IBRS, 2011-06-28 00:00:00

"The Art of lock-in Part 3" IBRS, 2011-08-24 00:00:00

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