Featured

The Latest

09 April 2021: During its advisor business update, Fujitsu discussed its rationale for acquiring Versor, an Australian data and analytics specialist. Versor provides both managed services for data management, reporting and analytics. In addition, it provides consulting services, including data science, to help organisations deploy big data solutions.

Why it’s Important

Versor has 70 data and analytics specialists with strong multi-Cloud knowledge. Fujitsu’s interest in acquiring Versor is primarily tapping Versor’s consulting expertise in Edge Computing, Azure, AWS and Databricks. In addition, Versor’s staff have direct industry experience with some key Australian accounts, including public sector, utilities and retail, which are all target sectors for Fujitsu. Finally, Versor has expanded into Asia and is seeing strong growth. 

So from a Fujitsu perspective, the acquisition is a quick way to bolster its credentials in digital transformation and to open doors to new clients. 

This acquisition clearly demonstrates Fujitsu’s strategy to grow in the ANZ market by increasing investment in consulting and special industry verticals.  

Who’s impacted

  • CIO
  • Development team leads
  • Business analysts

What’s Next?

Given its experienced staff, Versor is expected to lead many of Fujitsu’s digital transformation engagements with prospects and clients. Fujitsu’s well-established ‘innovation design engagements’, are used to explore opportunities with clients and leverage concepts of user-centred design. Adding specialist big data skills to this mix makes for an attractive combination of pre-sales consulting.

Related IBRS Advisory

  1. The new CDO agenda
  2. Workforce transformation: The four operating models of business intelligence
  3. VENDORiQ: Defence Department Targets Fujitsu for Overhaul

The Latest

16 April 2021: BMC has released a new edition of its Helix Platform, which leverages machine learning algorithms to support AI-driven IT operations (AIOps) and AI-driven service management (AISM) capabilities. The introduction of these algorithmic features enable IT service and operations teams to predict and resolve issues more effectively.

Why it’s Important

The use of algorithms to both categorise and predict events in IT operations is a growing trend. Such AI capabilities will be increasingly embedded in existing IT operations suites. As vendors enter a new ‘AI-powered’ competitive phase, these new AI capabilities will be included as part of regular upgrades and maintenance, rather than as add-on components.

Getting value from the new AI capabilities requires planning very human responses.  

For example, the predictive capabilities of algorithms, especially when using multi-organisational data, can provide op teams with alerts well in advance of problems becoming apparent. But unless op teams are resourced and given budget to respond to such ‘predictive maintenance’ issues, these predictive capabilities will be relegated to little more than an alarm clock with a snooze button. 

Likewise, the ability to correctly leverage and continually train advisory from resolution support algorithms, will demand both training of, and input from, the support team. The algorithms are only as good as the information and the contexts they can draw on. Support team people play an intimate role in ensuring the right information is selected for training the algorithm and, most importantly, the right contexts. This is especially pertinent as virtual agents (chatbots) are introduced for self-help capabilities.

Who’s impacted

  • CIO
  • IT operations staff
  • Support desk

What’s Next?

Begin to track the new AI capabilities available in IT operations support platforms, not just for the platforms used by your organisation, but in the competitive landscape. While there is no critical priority to adopt AI-powered IT operations or service management capabilities (just yet), it is important to understand what is coming and what may already be available as part of your current licensing agreements.

Assemble a working group to explore how AI capabilities could positively impact IT operations and service management, and the changes in process and roles that would be required to leverage them.

In short, start planning for AI-powered operations and a service management future.

Related IBRS Advisory

  1. Running IT-as-a-Service Part 55: IBRS Infrastructure Maturity Model
  2. Sustaining efficiency gains demands architecture risks mitigation Part 2
  3. Artificial intelligence Part 3: Preparing IT organisations for artificial intelligence deployment
  4. IBRSiQ: Approach to identifying an ITSM SaaS Provider

The Latest

18 March 2021: Veeam released a report which suggests that 58% of backups fail. After validating these claims, and from the direct experiences of our advisors who have been CIOs or infrastructure managers in previous years, IBRS accepts there is merit in Veeam’s claim.

The real question is, what to do about it, other than buying into Veeam’s sales pitch that its backups give greater reliability?

Why it’s Important

Sophisticated ransomware attacks are on the rise. So much so that IBRS issued a special alert on the increasing risks in late March 2021. Such ransomware attacks specifically target backup repositories. This means creating disconnected, or highly-protected backups is more important than ever. The only guarantee for recovery from ransomware is a combination of well-structured backups, coupled with a well-rehearsed cyber incident response plan. 

However, protecting the backups is only useful if those backups can be recovered. IBRS estimates around 10-12% of backups fail to fully recover, which is measuring a slightly different, but more important situation than touted by Veeam. Even so, this failure rate is still far too high, given heightened risk from financially-motivated ransomware attacks.

Who’s impacted

  • CIO
  • Risk Officers reporting to the board
  • CISCO
  • Infrastructure leads

What’s Next?

IBRS has identified the ‘better-practice’ from backup must include regular and unannounced, practice runs to recover critical systems from backups. These tests should be run to simulate as closely as possible to events that could lead to a recovery situation: critical system failures, malicious insider and ransomware. Just as organisations need to rehearse cyber incident responses, they also need to thoroughly test their recovery regime. 

Related IBRS Advisory

  1. Maintaining disaster recovery plans
  2. Ransomware: Don’t just defend, plan to recover
  3. Running IT-as-a-Service Part 59: Recovery from ransomware attacks
  4. Ransomware, to pay or not to pay?
  5. ICT disaster recovery plan challenges
  6. Testing your business continuity plan

Conclusion

This month, discussions regarding customer and employee experience solutions have been prominent. New remote working models have driven demand for products and services which support improved customer and employee experience solutions. Customer engagement services that can align business goals and needs with IT services and infrastructure are required to avoid the implementation of solutions that interfere with business processes. Data science tools, solutions and a combination of information from different sources can help vendors retain a focus on customer metrics that drive business growth. They also help to manage operations, supply chain issues and provide a greater understanding of changes underlying customer and employee behaviours.

Conclusion

Major increases in demand for ICT and business professional employment in the year 2020 have been reported, despite the economic downturn. These increases are important to note as they signal a post-pandemic increase in ICT investment in the year 2021 and in future years to support enhanced business systems and demand (user) computing.

To complicate matters a survey of Australian CIOs indicated that it will be more challenging to find qualified technology employees in 2021 compared to pre-pandemic market conditions. Unless recruitment programs are well thought out, the inability to recruit the right people will stifle plans to take advantage of ICT growth opportunities in 2021.

Conclusion

At 21.7 per cent, staff attrition within the Australian Information Technology (IT) sector is unsustainably high. Staff recognition can be defined as the action or process of recognising employees for the work completed through words and gratitude1. Over the past five years, globally, organisations have increased their focus and investment on employee reward and recognition.

However, despite this increased focus, research shows that recognition is not occurring as often as it should be, as only 61 per cent of employees feel appreciated in the workplace1. Research also shows that even when recognition is provided for employees, it is not executed well or enacted correctly 1/3 of the time.

Organisational development and human resource studies demonstrate that reward and recognition programs commonly do not resonate or hit the mark for employees, if they are: not authentic and sincere2, only provided in a single context, or are based on award criteria that is overly complex or unattainable3.

This paper covers how leaders and organisations can recognise and then subsequently avoid these three common pitfalls, to maximise the investment into employee reward and recognition programs and efforts.