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Data Driven Business

  • Key lessons from the executive roundtable on data, analytics and business value

    Conclusion: On 16 May 2019, IBRS conducted a peer roundtable on issues related to data, analytics and business value. The focus of the roundtable was to allow senior IT executives to explore how different organisations are leveraging data to achieve tangible business benefits.

    IBRS conducted the Domo-sponsored event, under the Chatham House rule. Participants included senior IT executives from a broad range of Australian organisations both in the public and private sector.

    This paper provides a summary of the key learnings from the event.

    Related Articles:

    "Data: An Asset and a Liability" IBRS, 2016-12-03 02:41:05

    "Machine learning will displace “extract, transform and load” in business intelligence and data integration" IBRS, 2018-02-01 10:03:37

    "Prepare to manage the “evolution” of AI-based solutions with “DataOps”" IBRS, 2018-03-31 06:43:42

    "Reframing Business Intelligence as Critical Business Imperatives" IBRS, 2015-10-03 00:03:12

  • Team Collaboration and Data

    Conclusion: The analysis of various and complex data sets could provide a catalyst for team collaboration. One of the challenges organisations will face in combining teams is setting out the conditions in which they will work together. Looking past obvious differences in background, or so-called professional culture, will be necessary to organise roles with the talents available.

    Initially devise pilots to assess teams and roles and the value of the output. The development of data projects should produce quick benefits in terms of output and team cohesion. Understanding of the analytical insights should be shared widely in order for the benefits to reach as many within an organisation and bring change where it is needed.

  • Reframing Business Intelligence as Critical Business Imperatives

    Conclusion: The days of viewing BI as a single solution are over. Organisations should view Business Intelligence as four distinct, but interlocking services that each addresses a different critical business imperative: reporting; self-direct data exploration; operational decision support; and data science. Each of these imperatives addresses different stakeholders and will have its own architect.

  • Lessons from security analytics projects

    Conclusion: Big data and analytics projects can learn important lessons from the domain of information security analytics platforms. Two critical factors to consider when planning deployment of an analytics platform are: the need for a clear business objective and; the depth and duration of organisational commitment required. Without a clear understanding of the objective of the analytics project, or adequate resource commitment, the project will likely fail to deliver on expectations. The worst outcome is that inadequate investment in people could result in an organisation drawing incorrect conclusions from the analytics platform.

  • To improve the Business Intelligence of your Organisation you need to learn the Language of Data

    Conclusion: Machines are becoming increasingly proficient at tasks that, in the past, required human intelligence. Virtually all human domain expertise can be encoded in digital data with the right knowledge engineering tools. The bottleneck in understanding between humans and software is shaped by the ambiguities inherent in human communication, not by the challenge of developing machine intelligence. To benefit from big data, organisations need to articulate knowledge in the language of data, i.e. in a format that is not only understandable by humans but also actionable by machines.

  • Security incident and event management - a primer

    Conclusion: Security incident and event management (SIEM) products can deliver solid insights into the security status of an organisation’s network. However, SIEM requires ongoing support, mature change control processes, and rapid and open communications between diverse teams within the IT department - as well as the rest of the organisation! A successful SIEM deployment must factor-in the resources required for ongoing support. These resources will be in proportion to the complexity of the network.

  • Business Intelligence is automation of operational management

    Conclusion:Pattern-based and repeatable processes, such as gathering operational data, validating data, and assessing data quality, offer potential for automation. The Web and software-as-a-service technologies offer powerful tools that facilitate automation beyond the simple mechanical pumping of data from one system to the next. Operational management tasks that focus on administration and control can and should be automated, so that managers have time to think about the organisation as a system, and can focus on continuous improvement.

  • Key steps in establishing a Business Intelligence Competency Centre

    Conclusion:A competency centre for Business Intelligence (BI) must have an active mandate and involvement from the senior executive to sustain optimised delivery of the organisational BI strategy. This leadership is a key factor in the ability to successfully deliver the initial benefits of the competency centre within a three month development period, establishing long term benefits.

  • Ensuring that IT can lead Business Intelligence across the organisation

    Conclusion:The implementation of Business Intelligence is critical to the optimised operation of even the most basic business functions. When executed well it provides quantifiable competitive advantage for private sector organisations, and improved service delivery outcomes for the public sector.

    IT has a significant opportunity to enhance its business relevance by ensuring that Business Intelligence best practice is active and transparent across the organisation. Organisations without a comprehensive investment and capability in Business Intelligence will struggle to complete and will operate below their potential.

  • What IT security lessons should you draw from the Verizon DBIR?

    Conclusion:The latest Verizon Data Breach Investigation report (2011) continues many of the themes drawn out since its first publication in 2008. However, the DBIR is not a best practice guide on how to secure organisational data; it is an aggregation of cases where organisations failed to secure theirs. Consequently, the DBIR should be viewed as a document which identifies worst practice, and provides instructions on how not to be a follower of worst practice. Some of the breaches that have made headlines this year show that even well-resourced organisations can overlook the basics of IT security.

  • Business Intelligence - from Fata Morgana to Fact: Part 2

    Conclusion: In our experience many Business Intelligence (BI) initiatives end up well short of their original objectives. But all is not lost. Sometimes it helps to learn from the experiences of others. For those:

    • Intendingto embark on a new BI initiative
    • Working to remediate a BI strategy that had lost momentum.

    This research paper examines some case studies and examples which reference breakthrough approaches and reflect the sometimes arduous travails involved in dealing with the many challenges presented by BI projects.

  • Business Intelligence – from Fata Morgana to Fact: Part 1

    Conclusion: To gain insight into C-level executive intentions with information management, Accenture carried out a global survey2 in 2007. Whilst the majority of respondents had well-developed views on the power of Business Intelligence (BI) as a strategic differentiator, the report unearthed an underlying frustration in achieving their vision of an organisation-wide BI capability. This echoes our experiences in the ANZ market in which we observe many CIOs struggling to bring their complete BI visions to reality.

  • Navigating the Bermuda Triangle of Business Intelligence

    Conclusion: In 2008, corporate databases reached unprecedented sizes. Yet despite the abundance and diversity of data, many organisations remain challenged by Business Intelligence (BI) initiatives. They buy on vendor promise, but many have difficulty fulfilling it. Against this backdrop, and in a confusing post-acquisition market, BI vendors continue to release increasingly sophisticated and capable products.

  • Putting Business Intelligence (BI) To Work

    Conclusion:BI technology platforms have been available in various guises for over two decades. Indeed, certain BI terms, such as ‘drill down’ have become embedded into business parlance.

    The technology itself is mature and capable and many organisations have harnessed it to their advantage. However, some of our recent dealings with both IT and business executives reveal an underlying dissatisfaction with their BI implementations. Complaints include costly implementations, poor acceptance of the technology, particularly by middle management, and concerns with data quality and integrity. 

In the News

New cyber security rules reset $8b cloud marketplace - Financial Review - 26 July 2020

Philip Nesci, IBRS adviser and former CIO, has warned that agencies will need to get their information management sorted out to capitalise on the new rules. ‘‘Agencies need to identify their...
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Australia can build a culture of employee-led innovation - DropEverything - 24 July 2020

IBRS advisor Dr. Joseph Sweeney discusses why it falls to individuals to look at improving their work in a post-COVID world. Dr. Sweeney comments on the need to build a culture of innovation that...
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Outdated work from home policies bog down Aussie businesses - Computer Reseller News - 6 April 2020

IBRS analyst Dr. Joseph Sweeney provides best practice-advice on working from home in the current pandemic situation. Dr. Joseph Sweeney discusses current working from home policies which are...
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Centrelink crashes under demand for crisis payments - Australian Financial Review - 23 march 2020

IBRS workforce transformation advisor Joseph Sweeney said many government departments had to navigate difficult IT environments that were only part-way through their digital transformations, with...
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Inside EY's security work at ANZ - Australian Financial Review - 3 March 2020

"There is more security work to go round than there are resources. So I don't think the market is that crowded. It's important to remember that security is not something you buy and then it's done;...
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