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Geoff Johnson

info@ibrs.com.au

Geoff Johnson was an IBRS advisor between 2015 - 2018 specialising in aspects of enterprise networking and related IT solutions particularly networking infrastructure and services including Telecoms, Data Communications, network preparation for Cloud applications, Unified Communications and Collaboration, Telephony, Contact Centre, Internet of Things / Operational Technologies networking, Satellite and Mobility. He had 23 years of experience in enterprise networking Analyst and Consulting roles. His specialty was Business Development, Strategy and Architecture Consulting for large and mid-size Enterprises, Government Agencies, Networking Infrastructure Vendors and Network Service Providers. Geoff has been a Research Vice President, Telecommunications Director, General Manager and Network Manager in both User and Supplier roles.

Conclusion: Vodafone Foundation’s DreamLab1 charity has shown in its work with The Garvan Institute for Medical Research how a huge and diverse collection of the public’s volunteered processing on their smartphones can be used in aggregate to solve complex cancer research problems2.

The use of Mobile and Cloud as the first choice for ICT infrastructure and applications has not been an intuitive choice for most enterprises but the supporting evidence for its value has built rapidly as seen in DreamLab. This case shows the power of using intensely popular smartphones to aggregate processing to solve supercomputer-scale problems.

It also shows that an enterprise Data Centre is not the only place to perform large-scale processing. A combination of vastly distributed third party computing managed by public Cloud is reversing the business risks currently accepted when an enterprise deploys its own ICT infrastructure and places significant risk with the Cloud provider.

Similar applications of this Use Case include other charitable donations of processing capacity; shared processing in channel-focused businesses; supporters aiding not-for-profit organisations; or those that collaborate intensely; or Internet of Things (IoT) scale micro-processing of Big Data scale information across vast numbers of devices.


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Conclusion: User-centricity, positive customer experiences (CX) and active customer engagement are the necessary central drivers of any business’ digital transformation.

Customer experience trends and issues need to be addressed methodically using a checklist to produce the necessary reviews of current approaches and plans to transform them into best practices.

Systematic use of the tools contained in contact centres, customer relationship management (CRM) solutions, algorithms in apps and communications-enabled business process will be the only responsible path for enterprises committed to improving their customer experience.


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Conclusion: Advisor reviews of recent business cases evaluating Cloud contact centres (CC) show that any upgrade needs to be driven by a customer service business strategy (not just a technology refresh).

Cloud delivery has become the dominant technology for any new contact Centres for two main reasons:

  1. Simplified contact centre acquisition and operation, and

  2. The new paradigm supports a wide range of current and emerging business strategies by providing relatively direct and complete integration into related enterprise systems such as CRM, ERP and eCommerce platforms which are critical for service fulfilment and creating positive customer experiences (CX).


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Conclusion: Although virtualisation is widespread in computing and storage, software-defined everything (SDE) is 3–5 years away from broad adoption by enterprises. Early adopters are major ICT Service Providers and enterprises with specific opportunities.

Enterprise architects need to understand the implications of SDE now as Cloud and managed services projects using software-defined technologies ramp up, or risk becoming irrelevant and wedded to displaced traditional sourcing and delivery concepts.

Failure to appreciate the impacts of software-defined ICT will mean that businesses will be making planning and budget decisions today for ICT futures based only on current practices that are becoming superceded. 


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Conclusion: The role and responsibilities of procurement and corporate services organisations is increasing relative to those of ICT groups as ICT becomes increasingly bought ‘as-a-service’ rather than installed as capital-intensive internal infrastructure.1

This demand is driving the trend to focus on governance, probity and sourcing management issues in buying decision frameworks.

Neither corporate procurement nor ICT sourcing teams can succeed in isolation: both will sink or swim together. The near-term challenge for most enterprise buying activities will continue to be the ability for both procurement and ICT to keep each other adequately informed and sufficiently knowledgeable in the other’s domain2.


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Conclusion: Microsoft is completing a unified communications and collaboration (UCC) product suite development journey begun more than a decade ago as it finally offers missing critical components with Cloud-delivered telephony. In doing so it risks alienating its current UCC partners (especially those in telephony).

UCC strategy, planning and deployment is incomplete, fragmented, or poorly organised in most enterprises due to a lack of curated planning for collaboration and imperfectly orchestrated adoption (especially in training and no mandated use of core UCC tools).

IBRS finds that SfB and similar UCC solutions are only worth the cost if inter-personal collaboration is properly implemented and realised consistently across a business based on a policy. For most businesses, this is a perfect time to review their communications and collaboration strategy because most have massively under-achieved their productivity potential and complete Cloud solutions are now becoming available.


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This Compass is a companion document to IBRS’ Master Advisory Presentation (MAP) “Delivering Digital Business Transformation” which outlines business and management issues and provides guidance on delivering an effective digital business transformation.


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Conclusion: Business leaders who have concluded that a Chief Digital Officer is required to provide a critical focus on their digital transformation plans, will find that defining the role in detail will remain an ongoing challenge because it is intensely context-sensitive.

Consequently, the first iteration of a Chief Digital Officer’s (CDO) role responsibilities, job description and person specification needs to be widely canvassed and tolerant of the ambiguity between maintaining ‘business as usual’ and a digital transformation.

A CDO role action plan is an important first step in setting and clarifying expectations.


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Conclusion: Many business leaders around the world have concluded that although information and communications technologies (ICT) are mature, their own business has yet to systematically address digital transformation as an opportunity and a Digital Officer is required to provide that focus. ‘Business-as-Usual’ is an increasingly rejected approach.

A Chief Digital Officer (CDO) or similar appointment with broad responsibilities is clearly needed to deliver radical digital transformation in large or complex enterprises.


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Conclusion: Despite the prominence of Business Process Management (BPM) in most organisations, Enterprise Architects are routinely oblivious to the scope for using Communications-Enabled Business Process (CEBP) within their BPM.

The very large global Microsoft and Google developer communities have run with the most popular collaboration suites as a foundation for their CEBP apps.

The most common CEBP solutions are based on customised messaging allowing alerts, alarms and notifications to be used to support business process. Widespread use of customised ‘Presence’ has become particularly helpful in giving the status of people or resources to inform transactions. Human delay and business latency is being minimised by using notifications to handle routine processes as well as exceptions to business rules.


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In the News

How Do You Choose The Best Application Environment For Your Business? - WHICH-50 - 8th October 2019

According to a new IBRS study, spend on enterprise solutions is set to increase in 2019-2020. Both IT and line of business buyers need to consider how they manage procurement of these new solutions...
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The pros and cons of shadow IT In today’s business world - WHICH-50 - 23 July 2019

Shadow IT sounds like a covert — quite possibly dark — force. And to some people it may well be. But the truth is both far simpler and more complex. According to Cisco, Shadow IT is the use of...
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Busting The Three Big Cloud Myths - WHICH-50 - 11 June 2019

Organisations that are resisting the shift to cloud computing are often basing their decisions on common misconceptions around security, price and integration. That’s a key finding in a recent...
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ANZ business users calling the shots in ICT decisions

Conducted by Australia’s Intelligent Business Research Services (IBRS) and commissioned by TechnologyOne, the survey of 261 business leaders in ANZ has shown that business functions are having more...
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Managed security: a big gamble for Aussie IT providers - CRN - 02 August 2018

TechSci Research estimates the Australian managed security services (MSS) market will grow at a CAGR of more than 15 percent from 2018-23 as a result of the increased uptake of cloud computing and...
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