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Governance & Planning

Conclusion: The return on investment in big data and associated analytics projects has been generally positive. It is more likely that returns over the longer term will grow too, provided strategic aims are established. The promise of big data hinges on information analysis, and therefore organisations must be clear as to use and application of the insight.

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Conclusion: Unless the Executive holds business and IT management accountable for reporting if the benefits expected in the business case have been realised or not, they will never know whether they made the right decision to invest in the first place.

To estimate the gross benefits and costs, it is imperative the business case records not only the performance metrics when it was approved, but also those current when the business system(s), was implemented (when there is a time lag).

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Conclusion: To improve the digital maturity of an organisation the CIO must encourage a team effort from business and technical areas within their organisation as well as strategic partners in the IT industry. Laggard IT vendors should be dropped in favour of digital leaders. The CIO will also need to convince their organisation to make early investments in long term capabilities that are critical to the adoption of new digital initiatives.

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Conclusion: To ensure desktop investments are aligned to the organisation’s strategy, and the business benefits are clearly understood, IT organisations should create a Benefit Dependency Network. This is a benefits management tool that explicitly shows the linkages between technology investments and the business benefits, uncovers the business changes necessary to deliver these benefits, and clarifies the role of the business in harvesting those benefits.

Through the processes of building a Benefit Dependency Network, the IT organisation can engage the business in a meaningful discussion about business benefits and about the business changes needed to harvest them. Without a benefits analysis a major desktop investment is less likely to be approved and there are risks generating no value for the business, perpetuating the view that IT is a cost that must be reduced.

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Conclusion: Non-IT executives are often reported as being concerned about the prospect of a cyber incident, but as security is not their area of expertise, responsibility for mitigation and preparation is often devolved to IT. This is a mistake, because as much as lack of any security could be devastating, applying the wrong controls to an organisation can be equally debilitating. Security is a response to risk, and it is the ongoing mandate of executives to demonstrate that they are guiding their organisation through foreseeable risks. Consequently, many organisations would benefit from the appointment of an information security officer who is able to translate between IT and the business and ensure that cyber risks are prepared for responsibly.

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Conclusion: The Australian market presents serious problems to marketers. The situation has been foreseeable for the last two years. The situation is likely to soften further, which will constrain their capacity to seek growth.

Solutions are available and require reappraisal of strategies and objectives. Applying intelligence and the right tools should help organisations steer through the variety of conditions ahead.

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Conclusion: Most organisations have some form of central approval process (Governance) based around agreed artefacts – few organisations have a built-in evergreening process to ensure governance controls are in line with emerging technology and business trends.

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Conclusion: There is debate within the IT industry whether or not DevOps can replace ITIL1. From ITIL perspective, many IT organisations, especially in Australia, have been implementing ITIL processes since 1994 with significant investment in technology and professional services. Hence, it is impractical to just drop ITIL and adopt DevOps. This is because firstly, DevOps covers only Release Management which is only one process of the 26 processes of ITIL v3 and secondly, DevOps in not different from mature2 ITIL Release Management. In this light, existing ITIL organisations embarking on digital transformation should plan to mature Release Management to match DevOps principles. DevOps3 sites need to leverage the lessons learnt from ITIL implementation to enjoy a smooth business transformation as fixing only the software release process without integrating this with the remaining 25 ITIL processes is insufficient to raise the overall IT performance to the level needed by the digital world. This research outlines that ITIL and DevOps can co-exist in the same organisation once brought to the right maturity level.

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Conclusion: Since 1994 many Australian IT organisations have been implementing Configuration Management practices. However, it has been done with limited success when assessed against the key objectives of Configuration Management process and its associated database (CMDB) in terms of service availability and configuration items interdependencies. IT organisations should review their Configuration Management plans in view of the latest public Cloud offerings and adopt a phased implementation approach.

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Conclusion: Workplace change and IT transformation projects typically bring with them more political (organisational) than technical challenges. To win support for these projects concentrate on the people by listening to their concerns and developing strategies to alleviate them. Let the technical solution stand or fall on its own merits.

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In the News

New cyber security rules reset $8b cloud marketplace - Financial Review - 26 July 2020

Philip Nesci, IBRS adviser and former CIO, has warned that agencies will need to get their information management sorted out to capitalise on the new rules. ‘‘Agencies need to identify their...
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Australia can build a culture of employee-led innovation - DropEverything - 24 July 2020

IBRS advisor Dr. Joseph Sweeney discusses why it falls to individuals to look at improving their work in a post-COVID world. Dr. Sweeney comments on the need to build a culture of innovation that...
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Outdated work from home policies bog down Aussie businesses - Computer Reseller News - 6 April 2020

IBRS analyst Dr. Joseph Sweeney provides best practice-advice on working from home in the current pandemic situation. Dr. Joseph Sweeney discusses current working from home policies which are...
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Centrelink crashes under demand for crisis payments - Australian Financial Review - 23 march 2020

IBRS workforce transformation advisor Joseph Sweeney said many government departments had to navigate difficult IT environments that were only part-way through their digital transformations, with...
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Inside EY's security work at ANZ - Australian Financial Review - 3 March 2020

"There is more security work to go round than there are resources. So I don't think the market is that crowded. It's important to remember that security is not something you buy and then it's done;...
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