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Governance & Planning

Conclusion: IT organisations responding to mergers & acquisitions or migrating to multi-sourced environments of Cloud and service contracts should establish service providers governance frameworks that favour federated organisations’ principles. It requires maintaining central consistency (e. g. policymaking) whilst allowing local autonomy in certain areas (e. g. hardware purchases). This will leverage the economy of scale, allow the acquisition of local services and products more efficiently, and permit the introduction of new geographies whenever needed in a consistent manner.

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Conclusion: Medium and large sized enterprises are complex, socio-technical systems that comprise many interdependent resources – including people, information and technology – that must interact with each other and their environment in support of a common mission1. These complex entities undergo varying levels of transformation throughout their useful life in a continual quest to remain capable of fulfilling the business mission and achieving their desired business outcomes.

A mature enterprise architecture (EA) practice is extremely beneficial in supporting and enabling a business to transform in a considered manner, to formulate and execute their evolving strategies. Whether in response to traditional business, modern digital or the emerging AI-enabled transformation agendas, the case for adoption of EA remains as strong as ever.

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Conclusion: Organisations need to plan to quickly and successfully recover business operations by creating and updating business continuity plans (BCPs) supported by disaster recovery plans (DRPs). However, there are many challenges to overcome in order to keep these plans useful in readiness when business disruption eventuates.

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Conclusion: Unless software testing practices are rigorous and enforced, system defects will continue and compromise meeting of service delivery objectives. Whilst defect-free code, and clean vendor software patches, are an objective, their realisation may be as elusive as the so-called paperless office.

To significantly reduce defects, and minimise risks, IT management must implement a program that elevates quality ahead of expediency and pragmatism, even if it is at the expense of the project’s schedule.

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Conclusion: Media played up the impact of Artificial Intelligence (AI) and Digital Transformation in 2018. However, the potential AI remains underestimated and its limitations misunderstood. In short, AI is reaching peak hype with investments sporadic and confused. In contrast, Digital Transformation remains a primary driver for investment, though it means very different things to different organisations and even different stakeholders within organisations.

Australia’s CIOs remain focused on tactical issues: upgrades of core systems, adoption of hybrid Cloud (as opposed to simply Cloud migration, which was a dominant theme in early 2018) and changing the culture and structure of the ICT group to support “as-a-Service” operational models entity

It is important to note that these tactical priorities of CIOs all have one thing in common: they are aimed at providing a technological infrastructure for the organisation to adopt “Digital Transformation”. In this sense, Digital Transformation is being used as a way to secure agreement and investment in more fluid, responsive and modern tech infrastructure and operations, rather than a specific, measurable business outcome.

In 2019, Digital Transformation is a rallying call, more than a discrete program of work with measurable outcomes. This rallying call will be heard by all stakeholders, but interpreted differently. The challenge for senior ICT executives will be to leverage the short opportunity the Digital Transformation call has to deliver genuine long-term benefits and update infrastructure and operating models to be more flexible and responsive to changing business needs.

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Conclusion: Some ICT strategies are technology-centric while others are business-centric. The technology-centric strategies are usually developed without business stakeholders’ involvement resulting in limited business buy-in. Business-centric strategies are based on business strategies but have a short life-span. This is because market forces require business strategies to change frequently. IBRS recommends that ICT strategies be derived from business and IT guiding principles.
The rationale is that guiding principles have a longer life-span than business strategies and can deliver the desired outcome such as:

  • leveraging new technology
  • involving business stakeholders in the development process
  • realising business value in a timely and cost-effective manner.

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Conclusion: Agile teams will struggle to deliver a viable solution (or product) unless they can tap into the business knowledge of an astute product owner who can communicate the objectives of the product and work with the scrum to ensure it meets the stakeholder’s requirements. Without a proficient product owner, the Agile team may lack direction which would put successful outcomes at risk.

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Conclusion: Australians have become increasingly concerned not only with what data is being held about them and others, but how this data is being used and whether the resulting information or analysis can or should be trusted by them or third parties.

The 2018 amendments to the Privacy Act for mandatory data breach notification provisions are only the start of the reform process, with Australia lagging a decade behind the US, Europe and UK in data regulation.

Therefore, organisations seeking to address the increasing concerns should look beyond existing data risk frameworks for security and privacy, moving instead to adopt robust ethical controls across the data supply chain1 that embodies principles designed to mitigate these new risks. Risks that include the amplification of negative bias that may artificially intensify social, racial or economic discord, or using data for purposes to which individual sources would not have agreed to.

Early adopters of effective data ethics will then have a competitive advantage over those who fail to address the concerns, particularly of consumers, as to how their data is used and if the results should be trusted.

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Conclusion: Agility has been introduced into organisations as part of their approach to increase the cadence, or velocity, of design, development and implementation cycles for project delivery. Increased levels of activity and visibility are also integral to many social media solutions and their approach to online presence. However, strategic planning processes evolve slowly and for many organisations this critical business and technology planning activity is lagging behind and no longer supports the business objectives in the digital era.

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Conclusion: Keeping the executive informed on how the ICT function is performing while advising it how to take advantage of changes in business technology is an ongoing challenge for every CIO or ICT manager.

Astute CIOs know that to get traction with the executive (or equivalent) they must deliver services required by stakeholders while contributing to strategy debates on how to use new technologies to meet the challenges of the future. Getting traction starts with presenting the right ICT-related information to the executive at the right time.

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Related Articles:

"Can IBRS provide a Checklist for reporting to the Board on Cyber Security?" IBRS, 2017-06-29 01:41:08

"Digital transformation: Top 4 lessons" IBRS, 2018-10-04 13:03:00

"Mind the Gap in the IT and Business Partnership" IBRS, 2014-10-01 20:39:56

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