Main
Log in

Governance & Planning

Conclusion: The program to upskill IT professionals and managers must be intentional and the results measurable. Unless the program is actively supported by participating line managers and affected staff, it may not meet the vision set in the IT strategic or business operational plan. The IT upskilling program’s initiatives should be presented by the CIO, to the executive or its talent management committee so the results can be applied elsewhere in the organisation.

Register to read more...

Related Articles:

"Demystifying IT workforce planning" IBRS, 2017-11-02 03:50:29

"Future-proofing your ICT team: Predictions and mitigation" IBRS, 2018-02-01 10:12:40

"Helping technical team leaders succeed" IBRS, 2018-02-01 10:09:58

"Recruiting today for tomorrow’s workforce" IBRS, 2018-01-03 05:52:33

Conclusion: Benefits management relating to technology investments is widely recognised in importance and is quantified and articulated in business cases but not managed. However, often these benefits are stated as expected by governance groups to gain investment, knowing that they are either aspirational or it is collectively accepted that they will be difficult to harvest and are therefore not pursued. Implementing a more pragmatic approach by project teams up to governance groups will provide an opportunity to improve this key area of IT investment governance.

Register to read more...

Related Articles:

"Achieving Benefits Management – It’s in the Tail" IBRS, 2015-06-30 22:59:05

"Benefits Management is Not IT's Job" IBRS, 2005-03-28 00:00:00

"Why it is important to actively harvest the benefits" IBRS, 2015-10-03 00:09:45

Conclusion: A requirement of the European Union’s (EU) General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) is the concept of “data portability”, which provides a right to receive personal data an individual has provided in a “structured, commonly used, machine-readable format”, and to transmit that data to another organisation.

Underlying data portability is an assumption that data standards exist and are widely used across all public and private sector organisations, especially in specific vertical industries, such as Financial Services, Health or Utilities. In many cases in Australia, no such standards exist and there is no framework to encourage industry cooperation.

Australian organisations needing to comply with GDPR will have to develop an approach and strategy to how they will provide data portability when requested to do so.

Register to read more...

Related Articles:

"GDPR potentially benefiting organisations" IBRS, 2018-02-01 10:19:45

"GDPR – A European standard impacting Australian organisations" IBRS, 2017-04-04 03:01:53

"GDPR: Who needs a Data Protection Officer?" IBRS, 2017-09-02 02:16:34

"Understanding GDPR requirements – Part 3" IBRS, 2018-05-04 18:57:12

"Understanding GDPR requirements: Part 2" IBRS, 2018-03-31 07:03:46

"Understanding General Data Protection Regulation requirements Part 1" IBRS, 2018-03-06 06:57:37

Conclusion: Unless the process of allocating IT and business resources to competing projects is transparent, and follows agreed procedures, disaffected management could develop shadow IT solutions and create additional technical debt. To ensure the allocation process is equitable, develop pragmatic guidelines so sponsors need only provide information needed for an informed assessment of their proposals.

To minimise the risk of project failure, it is imperative the right projects are allocated resources and those at risk are rejected or reworked. When developing the guidelines, ensure the information requested is succinct, apt for the size of the project, and the risks are clear and can be contained. The objective must be to ensure the process is as transparent as possible, uncomplicated and not protracted.

Register to read more...

Conclusion: In seeking to achieve their vision, goals and objectives, organisations constantly evaluate internal and external factors in order to take action. Although tuned to the unique needs of each enterprise, there have been identifiable waves of factors and responding actions that have occurred since 2000 in the form of business and digital transformation.

Business transformation addressed the changing nature of markets in a connected and globalised world by focusing on delivering cost savings through new models of operation, while the subsequent wave of digital transformation sought to employ technology and exploit pervasive connectivity to increase the efficiency of internal processes and customer-facing interactions.

IBRS has identified a new wave we call “artificial intelligence-enabled (AI-enabled) transformation”, which is focused on optimising business operations through the use of emerging technologies that leverage “self-learning” algorithms to make predictions, respond to real-world objects and events, and possess user interfaces that mimic how humans communicate.

However, in order to successfully exploit this new wave of transformation, organisations must first understand what exactly AI is and how AI-enabled transformation differs from the waves that have come before it.

Register to read more...

Conclusion: The forthcoming General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) legislation is being introduced by the European Union (EU), which has ramifications to organisations worldwide.

Key aspects of GDPR relate specifically to what data exactly an organisation should be able to legally keep and for how long. The underlying principle is that less is best in terms of data collected and kept. For the data to have been legally collected, an individual has to have explicitly given their consent to the organisation to collect, keep and process their personal data.

Register to read more...

Related Articles:

"GDPR potentially benefiting organisations" IBRS, 2018-02-01 10:19:45

"GDPR – A European standard impacting Australian organisations" IBRS, 2017-04-04 03:01:53

"GDPR: Who needs a Data Protection Officer?" IBRS, 2017-09-02 02:16:34

"Understanding GDPR requirements Part 4: Data portability" IBRS, 2018-06-01 04:21:44

"Understanding GDPR requirements: Part 2" IBRS, 2018-03-31 07:03:46

"Understanding General Data Protection Regulation requirements Part 1" IBRS, 2018-03-06 06:57:37

Conclusion: Project management in organisations is commonplace. Organisations then seek to establish a Project Management Office (PMO) as a more permanent centre for project coordination. PMOs may start in the technology division and expand or may be established outside the ICT area. Knowing what the various models and structures are is important. Knowing how to assess the maturity and environment within the organisation and selecting the appropriate approach with empathy and common sense is critical to success.

Register to read more...

Conclusion: The General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) legislation being introduced by the European Union (EU) in May has ramifications to organisations worldwide.

Australian organisations that have already invested in ensuring that they comply with the Australian Privacy Act 1988, and have a robust privacy management framework in place, may find that they already comply with aspects of the EU’s GDPR. However, GDPR does have more stringent requirements including requirements that are not within the Australian requirements, so effort and investment will be required by organisations that need to comply with GDPR.

When considering an organisation’s position and defensibility in terms of whether they complied or not, organisations will need to develop an understanding of the specific requirements, and how exactly they have implemented “technical and organisational measures to show that they have considered and integrated data protection into their processing activities”1.

Register to read more...

Related Articles:

"GDPR potentially benefiting organisations" IBRS, 2018-02-01 10:19:45

"GDPR – A European standard impacting Australian organisations" IBRS, 2017-04-04 03:01:53

"GDPR: Who needs a Data Protection Officer?" IBRS, 2017-09-02 02:16:34

"Understanding GDPR requirements Part 4: Data portability" IBRS, 2018-06-01 04:21:44

"Understanding GDPR requirements – Part 3" IBRS, 2018-05-04 18:57:12

"Understanding General Data Protection Regulation requirements Part 1" IBRS, 2018-03-06 06:57:37

Conclusion: Driving cultural change and managing the impact of change across an organisation when implementing a new business application is a key challenge for the leadership, including the CIO. By adopting change management practices, a business can increase its projects’ rate of success and user adoption of the new technology and business processes from 16 % up to 96 %1.

With the implementation of business applications or tools such as a new ERP finance system, HCM/HRIS payroll system or a new CRM system, the business users’ roles and day-to-day business processes can be significantly changed. Assessing and addressing the change impact with the employees during the planning phase and during the project implementation will increase the user adoption rates.

Register to read more...

Conclusion: Organisations everywhere are implementing Agile as a dynamic approach to speed up the creation of value and improve development of new and improved services and products. Adopting a best practice such as Agile is more than learning a new process and skill and then applying it in a project environment. Implementing Agile in an established organisation means that there are often a number of other frameworks, best practices and procedures that will need to co-exist with Agile. It is critical to consider these elements and adjust them to ensure that Agile is effective in delivering the value and benefits expected and is not another “best practice” fad.

Register to read more...

In the News

Outdated work from home policies bog down Aussie businesses - Computer Reseller News - 6 April 2020

IBRS analyst Dr. Joseph Sweeney provides best practice-advice on working from home in the current pandemic situation. Dr. Joseph Sweeney discusses current working from home policies which are...
Read More...

Centrelink crashes under demand for crisis payments - Australian Financial Review - 23 march 2020

IBRS workforce transformation advisor Joseph Sweeney said many government departments had to navigate difficult IT environments that were only part-way through their digital transformations, with...
Read More...

Inside EY's security work at ANZ - Australian Financial Review - 3 March 2020

"There is more security work to go round than there are resources. So I don't think the market is that crowded. It's important to remember that security is not something you buy and then it's done;...
Read More...

Google cloud boss looks to AI as it fights Amazon, Microsoft duopoly - Australian Financial Review - 2 March 2020

IBRS analyst Joe Sweeney has been tracking the three major Cloud vendors capabilities in AI and said Google is right to believe it has an edge over AWS and Microsoft when it comes to corpus (the...
Read More...

What should be in Australia’s next cyber security strategy? - Computer Weekly - 10 Feb 2020

Peter Sandilands, an advisor at analyst firm IBRS, called the discussion paper “a pre-judged survey” that is mostly looking for answers. He also questioned if the resulting recommendations would be...
Read More...

Subscribe to IBRS Updates

Invalid Input
Invalid Input
Please enter a valid email address
Please enter your mobile phone number
Invalid Input

Get in-context advice from our experts about your most pressing issues or areas of interest

Make an Inquiry

Sitemap