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Guy Cranswick

info@ibrs.com.au

Guy Cranswick was an IBRS advisor between 2002 - 2017 who covered Google (Apps and Search), broadband/NBN, Web 2.0 technology, government and channel strategy, including areas of business productivity. Guy had worked in the UK and France as Strategy Manager for Initiative Media and director of European operations for Modem Media (Poppe Tyson), the first online marketing and development company. In Australia, Guy was Senior Analyst at both Jupiter Communications and GartnerG2 covering online technologies and strategy in Asia-Pacific. He has published analytical articles in business and technology media, including the AFR, and was the winner of the Australian Institute of Management 2003 essay prize on the topic of corporate communications.

Just a week has passed since the election, and the Australian population can switch off their PCs (and Macs too) and Web connections as they have blogged themselves into exhaustion; debating and understanding the policies; been involved at the grass roots level of political and social debate, all in all, thoroughly engaged in the of political process.


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Conclusion: Multi-channel CRM is an area in which technology has to serve people, and when it does not, the disappointment and failure is measurable. In call centres, and in the growing, though underutilised implementation of Web based contact, CRM can be tuned to customer needs, if an organisation has made adequate plans, based on customer behaviour and usage.

If CRM solutions are chosen, for example, Interactive Voice Response technology, organisations may find a cost-effective solution over time, but one that short changes them in their ongoing relationship with customers.


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Conclusion: With a degree of inevitability the Web 2.0 bandwagon has reached CRM. And the reason is obvious: with so many Web 2.0 applications and media moving users to be engaged in some way, either by posting to blogs, or video and creating their own mashups, the engagement is interpreted as a sign of reinvigorated possibilities through CRM channels. Such diverse and disparate potential is however unlikely to be pursued by most organisations, although new approaches in communications are worth examining.

While for some businesses the mania over 2.0 apps is of value, in the main the hype is just that, and for one important reason: users may engage with some sites and corporations as friends might, but not with others, where the relationship might be described as nothing more than transactional. In other words it’s not an equal opportunity for all players and it would be unwise to accept the apparent 2.0 opportunity regardless of business sector and an organisation’s habitual relationship with its customer.


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Conclusion: Although without a firm launch date, the Google phone offers another interesting facet of Google’s relentless pursuit of digital media domination. While it may add some interesting competition to the mobile market, telephony is the least interesting aspect of the innovation.

The potential – at this stage that’s all there is – of Google’s phone on search and mobile directory services, all of which are related to advertising, looms larger and larger. It may a genuine catalyst in the development of Web 2.0 services, and along the way cause some anxiety to traditional media, Telco and directory service providers.


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Conclusions: Mobility and the exploitation of applications and content on mobile devices have been growing with furious speed in the last year. Although some organisations are moving to broaden or enhance their distribution channels through mobile, many Australasian organisations are employing a “smoke and mirrors” strategy to disguise their tardiness.

The mobile opportunity is ready and waiting and now is the time to be making real plans to realise that opportunity.


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Conclusion: Fundamental to any consideration of mobile banking will have to be a balance between risk and convenience; and that applies equally to both bank and customer. Even with the choice of secure technology the viability of mobile banking as a service will reside in its adoption, or not, by customers.

Worldwide the expansion of mobile banking is varied and the key factor in its sustainability is not technology but most probably customer acceptance. Any bank considering such real transactional services should conduct research into its likely acceptance with its customers thoroughly and use the responses to decide if mobile banking is likely to be a good deal for both parties.


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Conclusion: Evaluation and measurement are creative activities in the technology business. In terms of evaluating the productivity benefit of broadband, the creativity needed is quite high. Finding a standard ROI assessment approach is not easy and designing better methods to locate broadband productivity is another challenge.

In terms of measuring broadband, the methodology applied, is critical for understanding how broadband contributes to productivity. As the broadband debate rages over both sides of the Tasman, the need for a better designed research project that determines the extent to which broadband contributes or not to productivity of knowledge workers should be a priority for organisations in the IT industry.


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Conclusion: When future generations sift through the decade 2000-2010 they will wonder why so much effort was put towards understanding, managing and developing broadband and why many talented minds produced hundreds and hundreds of reports proving the benefits of this broadband. But as the current generation is stunned at the ignorance of history’s scientists, the same fateful judgement may rest on today’s analysts of broadband.

Policy makers and the community rely on interested parties to submit analytical reports which will have a determining influence on Broadband and its many affiliated industries and social projects. Unfortunately many, if not most, of the analysis from the interested parties is poor or even fallacious. If policy makers want to understand and steer broadband they will have to use much better analysis than is the currency of today.


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Conclusion: Even with software to automate research functions and aggregate data, many organisations do not have a clear understanding about their customers. This condition of near blindness is made more difficult in large and diverse organisations, where it is obvious that a whole customer perspective would be commercially advantageous, but is challenging to obtain.

By a mixture of technology and astute strategic planning, it is possible to gain customer insights but to do so requires precise planning, setting objectives and indicators, in conjunction with methodologies to gain feedback.


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Over the New Year the broadband forum, Whirlpool, conducted a survey of user attitudes to broadband services in Australia. There were many respondents, and Whirlpool has cleaned up the obvious faults in online surveys; so the results, though not be market research perfect, are a biopsy of what users think about the broadband service they are getting.


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