Guy Cranswick

Guy Cranswick

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Conclusion: When making the decision to invest in wireless, managers are presented with economic arguments from suppliers. Examining the variety of case studies* reveals that not all the arguments are valid, and this fact should not be significant, because not all decisions, should be, or are based on economic grounds.

Indeed, the case for a wireless solution in enterprises may be impelled by the same tacit logic of fashion. In other words, as more companies adopt it, perhaps even for purely financial and logical reasons, the spread of the technology becomes more compelling. If that line of argument appears fanciful, it is the same reason why the DVD is so popular, and in fact, one of the background causes as to how the PC took hold in companies, twenty years ago.

To assess whether to join the wireless movement or not, managers can simply do two things.

  1. Survey similar sized companies and organisations that have adopted it.

  2. Discount the putative efficiency benefit from any calculation of ROI in a short-term period, say the first year.

Widespread adoption of technology arises from network effects; in essence, because your competitors are doing it, there is a justifiable reason to do likewise.


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Conclusion: Understanding the future would obviously give everyone a real competitive edge, or at the very least reduce wastage and efforts in the wrong direction. Forecasting is intended to reduce risk but the quality of forecasts is the key to getting something useful from them. That statement may seem simplistic but many forecasts do not use standard methodologies, or even methodologies that are clear to an outside observer. For anyone using forecasts to build plans and investments, the forecast should meet two conditions:

  1. Use a clear and transparent methodology with data that is verifiable and from known sources, and:

  2. A forecast model that contains more than one outcome, because a range of possible outcomes within the confines of the forecast, may be more realistic given the variable forces operating in a market.

Unless a forecast meets the two conditions outlined above, what ought to be a powerful instrument with which to organise strategy, is just a scrap of paper.


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Conclusion: Until recently, relatively unknown presidential candidate, Howard Dean is creating a stir in the U.S. as the leading Democratic candidate for the presidency, which is attributable to his innovative and successful Internet strategy. From the obscurity of just 4 percent of Democratic primary voters, Dean has moved to 15 percent of likely voters, according to a poll taken in November. Dean also took a record US$7.4 million in online donations during the third quarter of 2003, almost half his total for the same period.

Deans and his campaign managers have not re-invented Internet communication strategies, what they have accomplished is better than their rivals. They have demonstrated what is possible once the planning is right to start with. The two elements they have done very well are:

  1. Utilised the Internet is a facilitating channel: connections go from one to one to one and thus join people together.

  2. Encouraged engagement through other techniques like weblogs and meetings.

By connecting with supporters and managing the means to stay in touch, Dean has made the Internet a critical component of his success.


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Conclusion: An organisation’s culture is a vital part of its business process but it’s an element of a company that is only examined when there are problems. Taking stock of the state of the company’s culture, and also observing it within departments, could be another means of improving profitability and employee satisfaction.

For an examination of culture to be worthwhile, it ought to strive for definite outcomes or else it may become just another exercise in staff management. Managers can make two plays to attain goals:

  1. Sanction consent and support at executive management level as it must be something the company endorses;

  2. Make the diagnostic process deliver results and not just analysis, thereby establishing goals in the future.

By ensuring that a cultural examination will be useful to an organisation, a better understanding of how the firm is working is gained. This type of information is qualitatively useful for managers.


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In The Economist’s most recent IT quarterly (September 2003) survey there is a scathing piece about the implementation of CRM in banking, and financial institutions generally. Australia is not mentioned in the analysis, but the point is clear – that as many as 80% of CRM projects fail – which is not news to anyone with experience of CRM projects. There is a gulf between the promise and delivery of CRM.


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Conclusion: Effectiveness is, along with efficiency, the aim of many projects and investments. It is commonly expressed as a ratio, outputs minus inputs. Measuring effectiveness is however a more delicate process of evaluation than employing the blunt, and occasionally, imprecise ratio method, described above.

Comparing effectiveness with other measures of a company’s performance, such as revenue, demonstrates how well a department or a firm is working. It is more valuable than simply comparing a ‘before and after’ financial scenario.

In adopting this type of approach two factors to consider are:

  1. Adequate ‘before” the event data, showing levels of performance is required to assess effectiveness. (Sound after the event data is necessary too.) Measurement of performance and function must use all key variables. These variables may include financial items, benchmarked service levels, and people performance measures such as e.g. job, morale index or similar;

  2. Make any analysis comparative, with the purpose of showing what has been achieved. Grey, and or, so-called mixed results from an effectiveness assessment arise from weak analysis.

Implementing the techniques above should improve the quality of effectiveness metrics and thereby raise the standard of business planning outcomes.


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Conclusion: Failure of the two main parties to use their websites to reach voters, as indicated by visitor levels just prior to the ballot, suggest important lessons for organisations marketing online.

The first is that content and information cannot retain audience interest, especially if the content is static and unchanged over several months.

The second lesson is that contact between an organisation and interactive communication through a website can be a strong tactic to galvanise a market. Evidence from the US demonstrates that the effective use of the Web, in conjunction with the mainstream media, builds momentum.

Many organisations’ websites do not change over long periods and the value of the site to the organisation, and to the marketplace, drops. Refreshed content and promotions, or other gimmicks may not be right, but techniques to reach and gather individuals, such as an online conference or chat room, can give renewed purpose to an otherwise static website.


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Conclusion: Business prospects are still difficult to predict with good news and bad in equal measure. Even so, growth is minimal and the market is flat. For business planners, management teams and CIOs, the next six months dictates a stripped down and lean strategy.

Benchmarking evidence from the practices of leading corporations shows they have adopted two essential strategic techniques:

  1. Determine organisational structure with the allocation of resources.

  2. Focus on core attributes of product and service and then develop the opportunity to enhance those product attributes.

An important ingredient to realise the strategic goals above is flexibility and preparedness to re-set priorities to trade into the next growth period.


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Conclusion: SMS has proved more versatile and effective in business-related communications than simply a means of chatting with text. By reducing costs and simplifying the process of communication, SMS is proving to be effective for firms dealing with their suppliers, customers and staff.

Firms of all sizes – and Government departments - can likewise benefit from SMS in two key ways. Firstly, it is a marketing communication channel which can be used for product promotions and secondly, it has proved its worth as an operational communications tool which can be used for channel management within an organisation.

Experience shows firms can cut costs and increase efficiency by using SMS to deliver timely and useful information to stakeholders. Having said this, it is important that the ease with which messages can be delivered should not be equated with permission to flood mobile phones with frequent and irrelevant messages.


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Conclusion: Every department within an enterprise is under greater scrutiny to prove their worth. For the IT service department rising beyond a service supplier relationship with the rest of the firm or agency means marketing their wares in two ways:

  1. Delivering services in a timely and responsive manner which like all actions can be a matter of execution;

  2. Opening and maintaining two-way communication channels with all areas of the organisation: necessary to deliver services today and to anticipate next stage requirements. To achieve these aims may require implementing some tried and tested marketing and market research techniques.

Getting the approach to marketing right can make a difference in effectiveness for an organisation, not just for the IT department.


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Conclusion: No solution comes shrink-wrapped and perfectly adequate so that it can be considered complete and that is true of e-learning. If the implementation of e-learning in the workplace has stumbled the two guidelines below will assist in getting better results:

  1. Ensure that the e-learning process is continuous – not constant – but persistent for all employees over time;

  2. Test, test, test, not just the e-learning software package but also what the users thought of it as much as the content of the program.

If e-learning is viewed as a process, not just a one-off event, it will become part of the working schedule and also integral to the productivity of the organisation.


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Conclusion: Despite the recent hype over search engine marketing the basic elements remain simple. They are:

  1. Ensure the listing of the website is clear, complete and comprehensive;

  2. Review it in 6 months, just as all marketing channel investment is periodically reviewed;

  3. Don’t spend more time and effort than is due to the task relative to the investment committed.

With these three guidelines the quality of the listing on search engines ought to be competitive


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Conclusion: The key selling point of 3G is remote access and mobility. This has been evident in the advertising from genuine 3G offers and the “pseudo 3G offers” from Optus, Vodafone and other telcos. The benefits of multi-media bandwidth are unnecessary to most businesses just as also bandwidth speed is not really compelling to most users.

There is no first mover advantage. Even other businesses adopting 3G would not be so convincing because there is no real advantage in choosing it – for reasons of price and usability - as there was in the early days of the PC.

Faced with a communications upgrade businesses need not jump in but should adopt three inter-related policies when considering 3G in the introductory phase:

  1. Negotiate firm performance contracts with vendors, e.g. No result no fee. If the claimed benefit has been improved results in business efficiency however that may be measured then it is up to the vendor to sanction those claims and support the investment in the technology on performance;

  2. Wait for prices to fall which is likely as with most new technologies of which DVD is an example

  3. Wait for better applications, which may come on stream but to date have not materialised.


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Conclusion: The two components of any online advertising campaign to get right are the communication objectives and the exposure frequency. This determines the number of times the audience will be exposed to the ads.

The communication objectives comprise the market or sales position of the brand and in tandem with levels of frequency are the two major variables to accomplish any advertising objective

In many campaigns frequency is generally ignored and also as it relates to particular creative work. Media planning must integrate both facets to the complement of the other to maximise the marketing investment.


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