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Guy Cranswick

info@ibrs.com.au

Guy Cranswick was an IBRS advisor between 2002 - 2017 who covered Google (Apps and Search), broadband/NBN, Web 2.0 technology, government and channel strategy, including areas of business productivity. Guy had worked in the UK and France as Strategy Manager for Initiative Media and director of European operations for Modem Media (Poppe Tyson), the first online marketing and development company. In Australia, Guy was Senior Analyst at both Jupiter Communications and GartnerG2 covering online technologies and strategy in Asia-Pacific. He has published analytical articles in business and technology media, including the AFR, and was the winner of the Australian Institute of Management 2003 essay prize on the topic of corporate communications.

Conclusion: There is no single perfect financial analytical method. There are some models which are in common use but their longevity is due to their lack of rigour, or that they can be used for any occasion.

The best way to avoid the obvious gaps is to combine techniques, not in one model, but for comparison purposes. By bringing together parts of the stronger methodologies users can obtain better insights. How this type of optimised composite model will work is shown in the next paper.


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Conclusion: Unlike other parts of business, IT has wrestled with a few financial analysis methodologies. Although those commonly employed work reasonably well, and have currency, it is clear to IT professionals that they are not as good as they might be. That is to say, that despite the application of a financial analysis to technology investments there is still vagueness and uncertainty about the quality of the analysis.

Eliminating all doubts over the merits of financial analysis is not entirely possible, of course, but it is feasible to apply better techniques as to how financial analysis is conducted.  


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For several months business analysts and government ministers have been telling the public that Australia has to lift its productivity. The urgent call to action has come about because the golden years of mining are stuttering. To fill the gap left by mining, at the same time as the creeping shadow of ageing ‘boomers’ lengthens, productivity has to rise.

Companies and individuals are aware of this. Recommendations to improve productivity come in various forms. With technology, it’s in almost every piece of kit offered, from gadgets that squeeze that extra bit of output per hour to a full migration or new stack. In the human resources area it may come as advice to give more time to the work-life balance. Even adding green plants to the workplace has been another means to lift productivity.


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Conclusion: An organisation planning a CRM upgrade, or deployment of a new CRM, has a wide selection of viable methodologies to choose from. Across the various methodologies there are a common set of principles which make application of a suitable methodology relatively straightforward.

Interpreting and using the most relevant components from a methodology will be important, otherwise there is a risk of being overwhelmed with too much information.


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Conclusion: A major reason CRM projects stumble, or fail outright, is a poorly argued strategy and business case.

A thorough strategy and business case will provide all stakeholders with a clear rationale of what is being planned, and the related business issues that will be managed better as a result. Additionally, the reason for the investment will be understood and the potential costs and benefits articulated.


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Conclusion: For many good reasons collaboration is seen as a means to improve productivity and kick-start innovation. Both productivity and innovation are how organisations can raise their effectiveness and competitive edge.

However, simply ‘doing collaboration’, as though it comes as a readymade solution, is a certainty to fail. Collaboration needs governance and management. The expectations have to be established and the tools to achieve an organisation’s goals need clarity and agreement. The biggest factor is people and culture, and how these respond and develop over time.


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Conclusion: Debate over Microsoft’s mixed record of successes and slow innovation during the last decade has incited conjecture as to its long term durability. As many highly successful vendors have disappeared very quickly, the same inference for Microsoft is a reasonable one.

While Microsoft has been ‘disrupted’ in the sense that it has not adjusted smoothly to new conditions, its demise is not imminent. The corporation has to fix several parts of its business, which will not be easy, but it’s financially sound and growing. Microsoft customers need not fret over its longevity. However, they ought to examine how much they depend on Microsoft or other flexible options over the next five years.


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Conclusion: Although small businesses and certain entrepreneurs are using Bitcoin, there is a business case for many other organisations to use the currency in limited conditions. It is one more transaction option that can assist commerce.


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Conclusion: Utilising vendor products entails a cost to the user above the licence fee. This cost, which is hidden, is mostly unaccounted except when dealing with a vendor that imposes vexatious conditions. Such conditions may alter usage rights and prolong the negotiation period to conclude contracts. That adds costs to an organisation it should not bear.

Where a vendor has myriad and confusing contractual terms it is a cause for organisations to assess their lock-in with that vendor. In reassessing their connections with vendors, organisations ought to strategically move out of deep lock-in towards more flexible relationships with vendors. For a user organisation to be overly dependent on a limited number of vendors is a potential problem. Reducing dependencies on single or groups of vendors may also deliver more efficient business relationships. It also serves as a signal to vendors that an organisation wants an efficient arrangement.


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Conclusion: CRM technology is capable of being put to several discrete purposes. The added complexity of the tools is necessary in the more complex digital communications environment. Even though CRM systems are more adaptable and extensible than before, there are still four central questions to CRM activities.

The central business questions that drive the sales and marketing effort are about communications channels and the use of data. Organisations should be clear about how they answer those four questions as that will assist in the way they manage CRM and its associated capabilities.


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