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Guy Cranswick

info@ibrs.com.au

Guy Cranswick was an IBRS advisor between 2002 - 2017 who covered Google (Apps and Search), broadband/NBN, Web 2.0 technology, government and channel strategy, including areas of business productivity. Guy had worked in the UK and France as Strategy Manager for Initiative Media and director of European operations for Modem Media (Poppe Tyson), the first online marketing and development company. In Australia, Guy was Senior Analyst at both Jupiter Communications and GartnerG2 covering online technologies and strategy in Asia-Pacific. He has published analytical articles in business and technology media, including the AFR, and was the winner of the Australian Institute of Management 2003 essay prize on the topic of corporate communications.

Conclusion: While organisations and personal customers anticipate NBN reaching their premises soon, the fact is it will take some time. The roll out timetable has been well known since the NBN design was outlined. The apparent delays in the roll out are the result of implementation and resourcing which NBN Co. has solved. NBN Co. expects to be able to ‘catch up’ on the roll out by the middle of 2013 and exceed its targets.

Organisations that want, or have a high demand, for the NBN should refer to the roll-out timetable and geographical detail. It may be a catalyst for planning, or allow them to develop strategies for services within their own organisational network which can be deployed in a timely manner.


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Last year, economic growth expert Robert Gordon stirred up the debate about the prospects for growth through technology. Notwithstanding the dismal global economic conditions affecting the US and elsewhere, Gordon said1 the most recent phase of technological growth was smaller than the previous one, and, in fact, his reams of statistical analysis point to indoor plumbing improving productivity and economic growth more than technology.


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Conclusion: The business case for the use, acceptance and adoption of mobile financial transactions is that the provision of the technology will create its own demand. Some persuasion and marketing is required but essentially the convenience and innovation of the mobile handset is a powerful catalyst. Eventually technological force will transform the way society transacts. The main players expect to eliminate all loose change in every purse and pocket.

Such confidence is not entirely misplaced. The industry is using many channels to convince the public of the efficacy of the technology. However the basis of the business case may not be as secure as believed by its adherents and that may be a costly oversight.


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Conclusion: Although more attention is given to mobile payments, the delivery of services will probably gain wider traction and help promote all trust-based types of transaction. Under this umbrella of services should be added loyalty programs. For brand vendors, loyalty is two-way as they understand the appeal of mobile devices is not simply transactional. It has a subliminal emotional quality which can be used as a platform for commercial gain.

Organisations ought to have business strategies incorporating technical scope and feasibility for mobile services. Critical market mass is important. While smartphone penetration grows quickly planning for programs and services should be put in place. Over the next year is when concepts may be organised into well-developed strategies.


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Conclusion: Ticketing and other forms of transactions are essential elements to make other forms of non-cash and mobile financial transaction become habitual to customer behaviour. The familiarity of using the mobile device in such a way, with guaranteed security and convenience, is fundamental to user acceptance. It will help encourage all trust-based mobile interactions on a wider scale.

While smartcards have been seen as the transport ticketing solution there are risks and costs. Ticketing solutions built on smartphone platform is the obvious choice for transit authorities and other organisations that offer services to large groups of users and must manage their use of the service.


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Conclusion: A major pillar for mobile transactions to gain widespread use is consumer acceptance. The various parties in the payments industry are working to convince the public of the efficacy of the technology and thereby change behaviour.

Payment vendors know that customer behaviour and usage must change for them to succeed. Altering behaviour can be difficult and costly. The adoption of cashless payments is not a done deal.


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Much anguish has been expressed over the Apple-Samsung patent court battle. It’s not that this run of patents wars is new – they’ve been a feature of the technology business for over a century

One of the nastiest feuds was between Thomas Edison and George Westinghouse. Apart from being a brilliant inventor Edison was a consummate litigator. One of the reasons the movie business took root in California was to evade Edison’s patent police. He owned the major patents on movie cameras and pursued anyone who reverse engineered his product. The East coast film producers were obliged to pay large fees to Edison; but on the west coast that was evadable. It is a suitable irony that copyright violation is one of the foundations of American film industry. Edison’s struggle with Westinghouse over alternating current versus direct current power was typically bitter. By 1900 Edison’s legal costs were $2M, equivalent to $52M in today’s money.


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Conclusion: Australian enterprises seem to be slow in adopting social media and related enterprise collaboration tools. Survey evidence indicates that corporate Australia is not as interested in the social and collaborative technologies as counterparts in other regions.

Taking a steady and progressive strategy implementation of social and collaboration is probably an advantage. Being an early adopter with such technology may be an opportunity for some enterprises but not for a mid-sized or larger organisation. However, waiting too long, or crafting an even better strategy may mean wasting opportunities.


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Conclusion: The time when IT could triage new technology and take a long view on its adoption is over. The technology/business cycle is now faster, just as business demands and expectations are higher. In addition, the influence of business executives is strong and is partly based on direct experience with certain technologies.

IT departments should re-examine their processes of evaluating technology. Making the process transparent and inclusive is a big step to communicating decisions and sharing in the collective aims of the organisation.


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Conclusion: For organisations that use digital content distributors, telecoms suppliers, and social media, the Convergence Review is an important stage in how policy and regulation will evolve. The review sought to update the regulations in the sector which has changed rapidly. Although the review did not focus on digital players, there were elements in the digital arena that indicate where change may lead.

It is probably inevitable that more regulation will enter the digital content and distribution sector. The need to impose controls will be to facilitate market competition and foster new ventures. It will also be used to protect individuals. That means that running an unregulated market is not possible if the goals of increasing local content, commerce and technology innovation are to be achieved. Organisations may have a special interest perspective depending on their role within the content, communications, technology development and social media sectors.


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In the News

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Inside EY's security work at ANZ - Australian Financial Review - 3 March 2020

"There is more security work to go round than there are resources. So I don't think the market is that crowded. It's important to remember that security is not something you buy and then it's done;...
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