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Conclusion: What to monitor and how you respond to the data is often poorly documented and not fully understood until after a failure occurs. In this world of “no surprises”, effective monitoring is a key success factor. If an organisation’s ICT monitoring strategy is to be successful it must be structured around the organisation’s business outcomes. The monitoring strategy framework is achieved through the alignment of the organisation’s critical-business functions, the ICT high-level design, the ICT architecture and the priorities set out in the organisation’s disaster recovery plan (DRP) as the primary influencing factors.
Key to an effective DRP is a clear understanding of the system architecture and design, with sound knowledge of the risks and weaknesses it brings in support of critical business functions. When the ICT monitoring strategy is based on this framework it will deliver a near real-time health status of the organisation’s ICT environment, allow for planning future capacity, and in the investigation of incidents when they occur. An effective monitoring strategy will be business-focused and not monitoring for monitoring’s sake.

Conclusion: Cloud offerings are now commercially available, allowing CIOs to engage the technology offerings with a high degree of trust that the service is secure and responsive at reduced cost to in-house solutions.

CEOs have an obligation to ensure their organisation’s IT systems are cost-effective and meet the security accreditation defined by government (or their Board). PROTECTED Cloud services can reduce cost of operations and meet many of the CEO’s obligations for accreditation (and review) of services, and therefore better manage risk, to meet government and best practice commercial security requirements.

All PROTECTED Cloud data centres certified by ASD are physically located in Australia. Depending on your needs, they all meet Australian Government data sovereignty requirements and offer low latency and in-country technical support teams to assist clients. Provision of PROTECTED Cloud services allows the CIO to restructure IT, moving to a more agile and potentially lower cost option to provide the appropriate security approach.

Conclusion: BYOD strategies need to be updated regularly to keep pace with the evolving nature of not just the devices themselves but also the increasing challenges and complexity to stay secure; all this needs to occur while offering increasingly flexible services to a 24/7 mobile workforce operating on-premises and offline. It is valuable to engage key stakeholders within the organisation’s leadership team, employee champions and also industry peers to ensure the BYOD strategies are as relevant and acceptable as initially reported in an earlier IBRS article in 20081 when personal electronic devices (PED) were being introduced into corporate networks.

Conclusion: Managing large IT environments and provisioning IT services within an organisation is complex and complexity will always exist. However, not all complexity is “bad”. “Good” complexity is the complexity required to simplify, to reduce costs, create value, improve security and improve overall operations and results.

Focus needs to always be maintained on reducing “bad” complexity. “Bad” complexity is the complexity that makes it difficult to do things, difficult to secure, difficult to manage, difficult to innovate, or difficult to adapt to changes in the organisation. “Bad” complexity comes with high costs, including hidden costs in lost employee productivity and morale, potentially loss of new business opportunities, or higher staffing costs due to the limited availability of the skills needed.

Organisations need to maintain a mindset of constantly managing initiatives to drive towards simplification in their IT portfolio, understanding that achieving this will involve sophisticated and often complex planning and the successful execution of those plans.

Conclusion: Technologists consistently under-estimate the growth of data volumes. The result is tactical actions aimed at increasing capacity achieved by adding storage on-premise using traditional bulk storage solutions or moving technical workloads, such as back-up or disaster recovery, to Cloud-based Storage-as-a-Service offerings. This reflects a decades-old mantra of “disk is cheap, buy more disk”.

When the lack of predictability of data volume growth is combined with the need to capture then distribute data from new sources as well as control the hidden cost of data movement across networks, these tactical responses fail to deliver transformational value to end users.

To deliver effective and efficient data storage solutions, IT infrastructure architects must collaborate with their information and data management colleagues to identify the demographics of data being managed1; they must then select storage solutions that optimise data capture, storage, distribution and access based on these characteristics, not simply by volume.

Conclusion: Preparing the modern business for Cloud requires a common computing and networking infrastructure with new Cloud architectures converging with data centres over a hybrid of both direct Cloud connections and traditional wide area networking.

Organisations must begin by conducting a “triage” of their applications into three networking categories: those in pure public Cloud deployment; a hybrid of public and private (“on-premises”) computing; and those that will never go to Cloud (such as legacy apps, or for regulatory or security requirements).

At Cloud-scale the network becomes a fabric that facilitates software-defined technologies1 (compute virtualisation, SD Storage, SD Networking and SD Security). Software-defined networking (SDN) abstracts network functions so that existing switches, routers and appliances can be made programmable to enhance their functions and reduce costs.

Eventually business IT processing will be delivered by SD Everything as all fundamental IT functions coalesce.

From today, businesses should be placing new emphasis on the “management” of their networking as both “virtual” and physical networks and plan to drastically reduce manual configuration and operation of networked IT as indicated below.

Conclusion: IBRS’ finding is that prominent Cloud marketplaces (CMPs) such as AWS Marketplace1, Microsoft Azure2, Google Cloud Platform3 and IBM Bluemix4 are gaining traction as alternatives to conventional enterprise ICT infrastructure and services sourcing.

Given the state of maturity of these marketplaces, they are currently only useful for quickly and conveniently locating and obtaining ICT infrastructure and microservices for use in low-risk small scale pilots or trials.

As wider take-up is underway with larger applications being adopted through AWS and Azure organisations should begin to prepare for a shift in the viability of enterprise-level solutions.

Our caution is that CMPs will not have profound impacts on enterprise ICT provision until both the IT and Procurement organisations within a business become satisfied that this approach has validity, value and is auditable5 and manageable.

Conclusion: Investment attraction is the main business driver of local government Smart City projects and planning, followed by automation and internal productivity improvement.

Trophy Smart City projects based on entirely new cities are rare, but new towns, city centres, technology parks, recreation precincts and showcase suburbs are common and benefit from the same principles.

Every existing municipal service should be reviewed as a candidate for support and improvement using digital techniques.

Current and emerging technologies can routinely deliver Smart City services such as smart waste management, parking, transport, street lighting and facilitating community formation. Imagination is initially the resource in shortest supply.

The Mayor’s support for Smart City projects and programs is essential (because of their novelty and the political courage required) in any region of the world. Always.

Conclusion: Business prefers certainty to doubt and some issues now appear to be clear:

  • Full deployment of Australia’s National Broadband Network now seems likely within about 5 years.
  • Its funding method and construction costs will create broadband access with higher prices than current ISP charges and those of Australia’s trading partners.
  • Enterprises now need to act in self-interest to review and plan their access networks for branch offices and customer service.

Conclusion: Community Clouds can provide the expected value of using “Cloud”-based services in a shared environment that may be more economical than a closed private Cloud or privately owned and managed IT solutions. But economics may not be the driving factor. Identifying a common “customer” need or client base can be the main driver to getting similar organisations to agree to use shared resources or services.

The effort in getting organisations to recognise the opportunity to work together and to actually implement a community Cloud should not be underestimated. As in arranging car pooling, whilst the benefits may be clear, there is still the challenge of finding the other participants who all want to go to the same place, at the same time, and with agreed cost sharing. A “lead” organisation is necessary to help coordinate the required effort to create a Community Cloud.

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