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Conclusion: Once an organisation decides its on-premises IT infrastructure model must be transformed into a Hybrid Cloud model the important question becomes “how is this best achieved?” While Cloud Native applications and Dev/Test infrastructure are the typical first steps they do not address the Enterprise applications that are central to most enterprises.

An emerging transformational strategy is one based on Disaster Recovery as a Service (DRaaS). This is a low cost, low risk, incremental approach to transforming on-premises IT infrastructure into a Hybrid Cloud infrastructure. The DRaaS leaders in Australia will be VMware, Microsoft and AWS in that order.

Conclusion: Before embarking on a virtual desktop project examine the major factors in delivering a virtual desktop rather than immediately focusing on a technical evaluation of Citrix vs. VMware. This should include use cases, service model (i. e., Cloud, Managed Service Provider or Build, Own, Run) and infrastructure model (i. e., Desktop-as-a-service, Engineered System, Do It Yourself).

While hyper-scale vendors have been a little slow in opening data centres in the Australian market, the anecdotal evidence is the take-up is very strong:

Conclusion: HP’s split into two companies is more important as a sign of the dramatic changes in the IT infrastructure market than the impact it will have on HP customers. When combined with IBM’s exit from the PC and x86 markets and Dell going private, poor financial results from leaders such as IBM and SAP, it is clear we are in the midst of a major industry transition that is being driven by the forces of Social, Mobile, Analytics, Cloud and Consumerisation (SMACC).

Conclusion: VMware’s EVO hyper-converged infrastructure is the tipping point for the move away from SAN based architectures. Over the next 3-5 years VMware EVO will commoditise and simplify compute/storage infrastructures in the same fashion VMware commoditised and simplified servers.

This will disrupt traditional systems vendors (e.g., HP, IBM) and new systems vendors (e.g., Cisco, VCE) and challenge the growth and long term viability of upstart hyper-converged vendors (e.g., Nutanix and SimpliVity). However, the real challenge to EVO will be IaaS, especially VMware Air.

Conclusion: Vendor offerings for end-to-end solutions for ‘self-service desktops’ are both limited and immature. Furthermore, organisations are likely to have many of the individual components that comprise a self-service desktop solution. For the next 4-6 years end-user computing cycle, organisations should look to construct self-service portals from existing point solutions, rather than looking for a pre-integrated stack.

Conclusion: There are many different Hybrid Cloud approaches, each with different costs, risks and benefits. Organisations should evaluate the alternatives to find which is best aligned to their business requirements, then update IT governance processes to guide the organisation towards the chosen Hybrid Cloud strategy. Failure to align to the right Hybrid Cloud strategy will either result in the creation of new IT silos, which becomes a barrier to the business strategy, or will adopt an approach that stifles business innovation and agility.

Conclusion: IT Infrastructure has undergone a major transformation in the last five years yet many organisations cling to their old practices and are unsure how to proceed. As Jeff Smith, former CIO of Suncorp recently said, most organisations are not limited by skills, people or money, but by what they think is possible!

To harvest the benefits of these changes IT executives must be willing to stand up and challenge the assumptions that underpin the status quo and as necessary push staff out of their comfort zones.

Conclusion: The Standard Operating Environment (SOE) desktop has long been considered a best practice and is widely used. However, in recent years consumer IT has dramatically changed users’ expectations resulting in frequent complaints that the SOE desktop is inflexible and a hindrance to doing business.

With corporate supplied desktop continuing to be a key application access platform for the foreseeable future, IT organisations need to find an approach that meet the user’s expectations while controlling complexity, manageability, security and cost. One solution is a Dynamic Desktop1 extended with a self-service portal that emulates an ‘app store’ experience.

Conclusion: The proliferation of mobile devices and increasingly mobile staff in the enterprise is driving demand for file sharing and synchronisation services. In the absence of a usable offering from the organisation, users are turning to the ad-hoc use of consumer grade services. This is often referred to as ‘The Dropbox Problem’.

Failure to provide a workable enterprise alternative will increase organization’s risk of data loss or leakage.

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