Jorn Bettin

Jorn Bettin

Read latest work...

Connect with Jorn

Have a specific question for Jorn Bettin?

Email

Conclusion: During times of tight corporate budgets the IT budget is often cut down. Planned IT projects are deferred and in some cases selected running projects are cancelled. Unless a systematic and economically sound approach for allocating IT budgets is used, the result can easily backfire, leading to increased operational costs and unusable half-finished applications. Yet, if the right steps are taken, a reduced IT budget provides the ideal opportunity for decommissioning cost ineffective legacy systems and for refocusing attention on those applications that really matter.


Read more


Conclusion:The balance of information power is skewed in favour of knowledge intensive organisations, to the detriment of information-poor organisations and individuals. Reliable, high quality information distilled from Software as a Service users is evolving into a powerful currency that can be translated into financial profit via the sale of ad space and other techniques.


Read more


Conclusion: Business process and software modelling tools provide a good example of a domain with an impressive number of industry standards, many of which are of questionable value. Although software modelling is an extremely valuable activity, and many of the available tools are of high quality, there are significant shortcomings in terms of practical interoperability. The current situation is the result of a broken process for software industry standard development and false expectation. Corresponding lessons have already been learned in other IT disciplines, indicating a path towards practical interoperability.


Read more


Last month’s issue of the Communications of the Association for Computing Machinery (ACM) contained a timely article on the role of formal methods in the design and construction of software systems. The article drives home the point that much of software development today still amounts to "radical design" when viewed from the perspective of established engineering disciplines and that, to date, there are only a limited number of areas for which established "normalised software designs" exist. But this picture is slowly starting to change, as model-driven approaches offer economically attractive ways of packaging deep domain knowledge as reusable "normalised designs".


Read more


Conclusion: It is all good and well to talk about alignment between business and IT, but it is easy to get trapped – either in purely theoretical business process models that bear little resemblance to reality, or in technical jargon associated with the latest and greatest implementation technologies. Given appropriate executive backing, significant productivity and quality gains can be achieved within six months or less by implementing a small number of fundamental best practices.


Read more


Conclusion: In the current credit and liquidity market investors demand more transparency, and accurate and timely product and market information, yet most legacy banking systems are not up to the job. There is a strong business case for replacing legacy banking systems to restore organisational agility, and to improve the quality of service offered to customers.


Read more


Conclusion: The usefulness of Web based applications is not limited to the provision of Web-enabled front-ends to traditional business software. The Web also allows the design of applications that are capable of putting powerful human intelligence at our fingertips. Tapping into that intelligence to solve truly hard problems possibly constitutes the next disruptive innovation. Intelligence has never been cheaper!


Read more


Conclusion: Manually re-implementing application functionality in a new technology every few years is highly uneconomical. Model driven automation offers the potential to eliminate software design degradation and to minimise the cost of technology churn. Yet the model driven approach only works if conceptual models of questionable quality are discarded, and if deep knowledge about the business is used to develop elegant, compact, and tailored specification languages for domain knowledge.

This article is the final in a series of three on technologies and techniques that are leading to fundamental changes in the architectures used to construct software applications and software intensive devices.


Read more


Related Articles:

"The Industrialised Web Economy - Part 1: Cloud Computing" IBRS, 2008-03-31 00:00:00

"The Industrialised Web Economy- Part 2: Software Supply Chains" IBRS, 2008-04-28 00:00:00

Conclusion: There is a clear trend towards specialisation amongst software vendors, not limited to vertical markets, but also in terms of a concentration on specific areas in the technology landscape. As a result, many software products are becoming more focused and robust, and the opportunities for implementing modular enterprise architectures are increasing.

This article is the second in a series of three on technologies and techniques that are leading to fundamental changes in the architectures used to construct software applications and software intensive devices.


Read more


Related Articles:

"The Industrialised Web Economy - Part 3: Automation and Model Driven Knowledge Engineering" IBRS, 2008-05-28 00:00:00

"The Industrialised Web Economy - Part 1: Cloud Computing" IBRS, 2008-03-31 00:00:00

Conclusion: For most corporate IT departments, concepts such as Cloud Computing seem light years away from current day-to-day reality. Yet the number of commercial providers of such services is growing fast, and even more far-fetched ideas such as global software service supply chains are emerging on the horizon. The distance between innovators and late adopters of modern techniques and technologies is growing. In this scenario it is essential to know when not to remain amongst the late adopters, to avoid being left behind in the dust and struggling with evaporating profit margins.

This article is the first in a series of three on technologies and techniques that are leading to fundamental changes in the architectures used to construct software applications and software intensive devices. First examples of these changes are already visible today, and over the next five years, many of the current rules for architecting business applications will be re-written.


Read more


Related Articles:

"The Industrialised Web Economy - Part 3: Automation and Model Driven Knowledge Engineering" IBRS, 2008-05-28 00:00:00

"The Industrialised Web Economy- Part 2: Software Supply Chains" IBRS, 2008-04-28 00:00:00

Conclusion:One of the more common mistakes that organisations make in implementing Service Oriented Architecture (SOA) is assuming that introducing the concept of services into the architecture and conforming to SOA-related technical industry standards amounts to a sufficient condition for the development of a maintainable software architecture. Getting software design right additionally requires a solid component architecture underneath the visible layer of business services.


Read more


Conclusion: Authentication is arguably one of the biggest stumbling blocks on the road towards massive use of Software as a Service and Cloud Computing. Enabling authentication via the traditional login dialogue between individual systems and users does not scale anymore, and home-grown single sign-on architectures are largely limited to the corporate boundary. OpenID addresses the issue of establishing trust and credentials head-on, and makes use of a process pattern that is well established in the domain of financial transactions.


Read more


Conclusion: It is well known that the cost to rectify a defect increases significantly the later the stage in the systems development life cycle it is discovered. At the same time it is well known that software requirements can only be reliably uncovered when an iterative process of validating software under construction is used. Taking full advantage of iterative requirements validation while minimising the costs associated with late defect discovery requires a 360 degree perspective on requirements and testing that goes beyond the scope of individual projects, as well as a realistic perspective regarding the (in)ability to foresee future requirements.


Read more


Conclusion: Implementing a web service oriented architecture leads to more maintainable application systems that are cheaper to operate - if you can afford to wait three years or longer, without resorting to cutting corners, or even pulling the plug. Reduction of risk exposure is the real and immediate reason why consumption and creation of services should be an essential part of renovating and evolving the enterprise application landscape of a software intensive business.


Read more