Kevin McIsaac

Kevin McIsaac

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Conclusion: For the last 20 years an organisation’s applications and data have been largely accessed from a Windows desktop. While the Windows desktop will remain an important access platform, IT organisations will be expected to also enable access via mobile device and to support Software as a Service (SaaS) applications.

The first step is to shift paradigms from “delivering a standardised desktop” to “enabling access from a range of devices and form factors using multiple delivery methods”. The second step is to choose between a best-of-breed or integrated platform strategy for the management platform.


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In the last four years the mobile device space has undergone a major transformation as Apple redefined the market, first with the iPhone and then the iPad. In that period Apple created a mobile device business with revenues that exceed the total of all Microsoft’s revenues1!

Microsoft, long the dominant desktop software vendor, has struggled in the mobile device market and has fallen out of favour with the consumer and the enterprise for mobile devices. A recent survey2 of the smartphone installed base in the US shows the iPhone has 34% of the market, Android 51% of the market and Windows mobile 4%.


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Conclusion: In the last two years VMware’s desktop vision has undergone a profound transformation from a narrowly focused VDI (a centralised, virtualised desktop) strategy to a broader Dynamic Desktop1 strategy that supports Physical and Virtual desktops and Software as a Server and mobile applications. Despite this change, for the next 18 months VMware will continue to trail Citrix, which has greater desktop experience and had all the elements of a Dynamic Desktop since 2009.


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Conclusion: IBM’s launch of its PureSystems line of hardware completes the vendor line-up for Integrated Systems. While this does not dramatically change the market it does further solidify our 2009 prediction that IT infrastructure is transitioning to a new procurement and deployment model. However, due to internal barriers adoption rates are modest and this transition will only happen slowly over the next seven years.

On the next major IT infrastructure refresh, especially storage, IT organisations should review their approach to procuring and delivering infrastructure. This may require challenging the established infrastructure dogma in order to accurately evaluate the benefits of Integrated System.


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The topic of Bring Your Own Device (BYOD) has resurfaced this year. While this is an important trend that needs to be examined by IT organisations, be careful to separate the facts from the hype. Here are the four most common myths that I keep hearing.


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Conclusion: As the market for Board Portals rapidly matures, IT organisations are being asked to assist in selecting and implementing a solution. This is a golden opportunity to raise the IT Organisation’s profile with some of the most influential people in the company.

The CIO must ensure that technical staff do not overcomplicate the project and must find an Executive sponsor who can manage the Board members’ requirements and expectations.


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Conclusion: In spite of changes over the last decade the Microsoft Windows Server licensing is still rooted in the physical machine era of the ’90s. However, most organisations run the majority of their x86 workloads in virtual machines. Microsoft’s disconnect with the virtualisation realities of the last five years can result in licensing confusion. Organisations that choose the wrong licensing approach will either greatly over-spend on Microsoft licences or, more likely, not be compliant.


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Conclusion: In spite of some benefits in security, remote access and speed of deployment, VDI has remained a niche product. This has largely been due to the higher complexity and much greater capital cost compared with a Full Desktop. However, as VDI infrastructure innovations continue to close the gap, the adoption of VDI will increase beyond this small base. Due to the risks and costs of switching from a well understood model to a relative unknown model, the adoption will increase at a moderate rate and there never will be a “year of VDI”.


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Related Articles:

"Is this the year of VDI? (Part 1)" IBRS, 2012-02-29 00:00:00

Conclusion: No, and there never will be “the year of VDI”. However, now that the capital cost of VDI is close to that of a Full Desktop the adoption of VDI will begin to increase beyond its current small niche. The large capital cost and complexity of replacing the existing desktop fleet, the perceived risks in using to a new desktop approach, and a general lack of experienced staff will ensure adoption of VDI will proceed slowly.

For the next 5-7 years organisations will continue to use a range of desktop deployment techniques (such as Full Desktop, Laptop, Remote Desktop Services aka Terminal Server) with VDI being just one of many.


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Related Articles:

"Is this the year of VDI? (Part 2)" IBRS, 2012-03-30 00:00:00

Conclusion: As discussed in “Backup is not Archive!1 all IT organisations should evaluate the deployment of an archival platform to reduce storage costs and improve unstructured data management. Our 2008 survey found archiving in ANZ organisations to be immature and with many risks. A follow-up survey in 2011, and on-going client discussion, shows this situation has improved as evidenced by higher implementation success rates and customer satisfaction scores.

We found the products most commonly used in production were Symantec Enterprise Vault and Commvault Simpana. These products were very well rated by the organisations that used them while EMC on the other hand continues to struggle.


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Conclusion: The foundation of any BYO device initiative is a robust BYO device policy. The policy must set the boundaries for acceptable use, costs and security. Ensure device security is driven by business stakeholders and is based on pragmatic risk analysis rather than technical concerns from IT staff, or FUD from vendors who are anxious to sell their wares.

Robust policy, strong corporate culture and proper training can be more effective than technology in securing corporate data and controlling costs and risk. Use policy, culture and training to drive compliance, minimising the need for complex and expensive technological controls.


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Related Articles:

"BYO Devices (Part 1): Adoption in ANZ" IBRS, 2011-11-26 00:00:00

The Cloud is a significant long term trend that you ignore at your peril. Like the introduction of the PC and Open Systems in the ‘80s/‘90s, you can either selectively embrace the Cloud or find yourself bypassed by the business units who will introduce Cloud based solutions to suit their tactical needs and political agendas.

Unless you embrace the cloud, albeit in a controlled and limited way, you risk losing control of the IT Architecture, which will lead to an overly complex, costly and ineffective environment in the long run. Even worse, while individual business units may gain some temporary benefits, the overall organisational agility will decrease and the alignment of IT to the business will break down, creating longer term problems for the organisation as a whole.


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Conclusion: The idea of Bring-Your-Own (BYO) Laptop has been bandied about for the last seven years, but it is not as common as implied by the press. Few ANZ organisations have BYO Laptops, however some have implemented BYO smartphones and many intend to do so in the next 18 months.

The driver of BYO device in the organisation is not avoidance of the capital costs but rather the need to accommodate users’ expectations of technology, which have been significantly increased by the consumerisation of IT, and largely driven by the iPhone and iPad.


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Related Articles:

"BYO Devices (Part 2): Policy" IBRS, 2011-12-28 00:00:00

Conclusion: Cloud computing has multiple dimensions that must be considered when analysing risk. The use of four key variables can rapidly identify the expected level of risk in a cloud computing scenario. These four variables – deployment model, geographic location of data, supplier arrangements and information criticality – can be quickly applied to assess the level of risk and determine a suitable mitigation strategy.


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