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Conclusion: Conducting effective business impact analysis details the business functions and provides further insight into the relative importance of each function and its criticality. The information is then used as the main source to develop business recovery strategies, the priority of restoration and identification of resources to aid in the restoration of business services. However, there are many challenges in performing this critical step in order to be best prepared when those business disruptions do occur.

Conclusion: There are two broad groups of digital strategies – bold and defensive. Companies that choose bolder strategies tend to be more successful. However, there are good reasons why certain enterprises should consider choosing more conservative defensive digital strategies as there are still benefits to be gained from this approach. Strategy selection depends on a variety of factors, including industry forces and other factors which make each enterprise unique. It is important not to be half-hearted about digital ambition – defensive strategies are not sufficient in the long run. Strong and committed leadership at the top and throughout the organisation is still crucial to the successful implementation of digital initiatives.

Conclusion: The IT organisation in most enterprises suffers from the “Cobbler’s Children” syndrome – they give great advice but do not practise what they preach. A prime example is when IT does not apply Enterprise Architecture approaches and capabilities to the business of IT itself1 and yet expects other departments to apply such principles. Sadly, a new deficiency is emerging in IT as increasingly the role of analytics is democratised across the business – leading to the lack of data analytics capability for IT itself.

As organisations embrace data science, artificial intelligence and machine learning to generate increasingly sophisticated insights for performance improvement, IT must not let itself be left behind. This means ensuring that within a contemporary IT-as-a-Service operating model, space is created for the role of IT Data Analyst. This should be an inward-facing function with primary responsibility for the generation and curation of the IT organisation’s own core information assets in the form of data relating to the portfolio of IT assets, services and initiatives, including curation of operating data from Cloud providers and other partners.

Conclusion: Digital transformation is top of the agenda for most companies in 2019. Many organisations have initiated digital transformation programs and are seeing success with small-scale pilots. However, these activities do not easily scale across the enterprise or ecosystem, limiting an organisation’s capacity to fully realise the benefits of their digital transformation investment.

The biggest barrier to scaling is not technology. It is culture. The established culture in a stable and successful organisation is likely to resist disruption. Existing remuneration and recognition frameworks tend to reward existing behaviours. Individuals and groups will resist change if they do not believe the “digital vision”. A clear, compelling narrative is needed.

Effective scaling of digital initiatives must be led with a commitment from the top, intense communication at all levels and a clearly articulated vision of the future. Organisations that recognise this and can source the right capabilities to deliver large-scale digital transformations will have higher success rates than those which do not.

Conclusion: Developing a digital strategy or embarking on a digital transformation program is now a common business narrative. For some organisations it is a process of recasting existing IT strategy and continuing in more or less the same manner. For others it involves initiating a technology project as a way to learn new processes and update platforms and skills. Understanding the business readiness of the organisation is a critical element for any change but is key to digital transformation.

Related Articles:

"Digital transformation – get strategy and people right first" IBRS, 2016-08-03 08:01:16

"Digital transformation: More than a technology project" IBRS, 2018-06-01 04:04:24

"Digital transformation: Top 4 lessons" IBRS, 2018-10-04 13:03:00

Conclusion: On 3rd April 2018, Microsoft announced the availability of its Azure Cloud running within Canberra Data Centres (CDC) facilities, and officially rated for protected workloads.

Superficially, this appears to boost Microsoft’s ability to “check off” security concerns for government and other clients that have specific compliance demands.

While removing compliance barriers to Cloud adoption is certainly welcome, there are more compelling factors for considering the new Azure facilities. These include: closing the gap between legacy solutions, hyper-scale, (selected) SaaS environments, and legacy solutions; reducing the distinction between public and private Cloud services; blending customer ecosystems for critical national infrastructure.

The timing of this new infrastructure coincides with The Security of Critical Infrastructure Bill introduced to the Lower House in December last year, and passed by the Senate late last week.

Conclusion: Current approaches to knowledge management are being disrupted by a wave of new working practices that replace the paper-based metaphor which pre-dates the computer revolution, with a digital-only metaphor. While this change has been brewing for over a decade, it should not be confused with simple “digitisation” of paper processes. It is a fundamental shift in thinking about knowledge as a digital asset.

This disruption is already seeing tensions for organisations embracing new collaborative workplace productivity suites, such as G Suite and Office 365. Likewise, vendors of enterprise content management (ECM) solutions are struggling to find relevance, or are fundamentally rethinking their future offerings.

Understanding the differences between the current paper-metaphor approach to knowledge management and the (still evolving) digital-only metaphor is a vital set to a workable knowledge management for the future, and for planning future investments in ECM solutions – which will not be anything like the ones of the past.

Conclusion: Most organisations today understand that business change requires the effective management of stakeholders. Whether they be internal or external, the inclusion of their opinions, needs and concerns is critical to the success of the initiative. However, too many projects and change programs still struggle to be completed successfully or to achieve desired outcomes. Change management and stakeholder engagement is too often handled as a linear process and many are under the assumption that working through the activities in sequence will be sufficient. Stakeholders are complex to identify and to assess as their relative power and influence often go beyond the obvious. Effective stakeholder engagement absolutely requires a full and frank appreciation of the power and influence of each stakeholder.

Conclusion: The future of customer service will rely heavily on automating assistance with targeted empathy1.

Expect virtual digital assistants to heavily reduce the need for contact centre services and become the preferred choice as a CX channel.

Amazon’s $100 million investment2 fund to drive innovation in Alexa and its large installed base will advance Alexa and consumer digital assistant Echo capabilities rapidly3.

Treat Amazon Web Services’ (AWS) new “Connect” Contact Centre-as-a-Service (CCaaS) product as a complementary customer experience (CX) tool. Expect Connect to operate as a Trojan Horse for more complete AWS AI and CX solutions inside AWS customers’ operations.

Within two years it should be clear that AWS Connect has provided a significant point of inflection in the direction and functionality of global contact centre operations and the use of blended virtual digital assistants for voice navigation in CX. This is because in future, ecommerce or any customer service supported by separate or poorly integrated merchandising and buyer assistance platforms will be thoroughly unacceptable to end users4. A seamless fully blended CX56 will have become the (minimum) norm.

Conclusion: Australian governments at the federal and state levels have been implementing, modifying, discarding or persevering with shared services models for the better part of 15 years. Most of these initiatives were based on the premise that consolidating corporate service functions into a single entity and providing “shared services” back to the originating agencies would provide significant efficiencies and cost savings. While the concept of shared services does have considerable potential for value creation and efficiencies for government sectors, it is the execution that needs to be rethought.

Shared services operational units need to heed the learnings from other activities including:

  • the entrepreneurial sector
  • application of UCD
  • other service redesign techniques, and effectively generate a spin-off that everyone wants to receive services from.

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