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Operations & Service Delivery

Conclusion: Shared services commenced as a movement in the early 1990s and rapidly became a worldwide trend in both the private and public sectors. Conceptually the prospect of doing of more with less is appealing. However, anecdotally, there have been just as many failures as successes, especially in the delivery of IT shared services.

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Conclusion: Business Process Re-engineering (BPR) has been reborn, albeit in a new form. After achieving cult-like status for a number of years in the 1990s following publication of the book “Reengineering the Corporation”, authored by Michael Hammer and James Champy, BPR seemed to disappear from the corporate radar.

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Conclusion: For a project to be judged a success it must not only provide its deliverables on-time and within budget, it must also deliver the benefits that were outlined in its Business Case. These benefits will normally not be achieved unless there is a successful outcome to the process of change. The change may impact the organisation in a variety of ways, for example through changes to business processes, procedures, products or technology.

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Conclusion: One of the dilemmas facing senior managers is whether to allocate IT expenses to a service type or absorb them as a corporate overhead. The problem is compounded when a direct expense, attributable to Cost of Sales for a service or product, is involved. If it is absorbed as a corporate overhead unit costs needed to determine pricing will be hard to identify.

When issues, such as the one above arise, managers have to wrestle with options for chargeback systems for IT services and whether the effort is justified. There is no right or wrong answer, only the preferred option.

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Conclusion: Stories of late and failed projects are legion within information technology. Whilst there are may be many reasons for project failure, a key root cause, largely overlooked in the literature, is failure to correctly enunciate user requirements. A less than satisfactory outcome at the requirements definition stage can only become magnified as the project proceeds.

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Almost overnight our organisation became a $3 billion a year company with staff numbering 3,500 and in excess of 100 locations. This all occurred despite a business plan which stated that we would not be seeking revenue growth over the next three years but rather seeking, greater profit on a steady turnover through increased efficiencies. However when opportunity knocks it is not easy to turn it away, particularly when you are under clear instructions from the parent company.

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The changes that are currently being driven through the business are having an interesting affect on how Information Technology is being viewed. As it becomes more and more apparent that the changes required rely in the main on IT to deliver the appropriate infrastructure, it becomes equally apparent that there are insufficient IT resources to do so efficiently within the time frame expected. Furthermore the extent of the changes and the demands on IT are such that a significant additional investment in personnel and software is required.

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Conclusion: Manywho have outsourced their Service Desk complain that in doing so they lost touch with the pulse of their organisation. Bringing the Service Desk back in-house allows customer and IT intimacy to be re-established.

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For a long time now the organisational structure of the group of construction companies to which we belong has more or less flown in the face of what would normally be considered best practice. The holding company’s philosophy has always been that as three of the operating divisions compete against each other in the highly competitive Australian market place, they should, within reason, be free to leverage what competitive advantage they can.

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Conclusion: Delivering real business improvement in Workforce Automation & Management practices has proven elusive for many organisations. Two principal factors seem to have been at play. Firstly, a piecemeal approach seems to have been taken with a focus on rostering rather than on the entire process chain (see diagram). Secondly, the organisational change management effort seems to have been underestimated. With so few opportunities available to businesses to deliver bottom line savings from application software initiatives, it is now timely to revisit this area. Further, increasing safety-awareness in sectors such as mining, construction and transportation, have highlighted the need to achieve success with WAM initiatives, in some cases driven by the need to comply with fatigue management standards for rostered staff.

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In the News

Outdated work from home policies bog down Aussie businesses - Computer Reseller News - 6 April 2020

IBRS analyst Dr. Joseph Sweeney provides best practice-advice on working from home in the current pandemic situation. Dr. Joseph Sweeney discusses current working from home policies which are...
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Centrelink crashes under demand for crisis payments - Australian Financial Review - 23 march 2020

IBRS workforce transformation advisor Joseph Sweeney said many government departments had to navigate difficult IT environments that were only part-way through their digital transformations, with...
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Inside EY's security work at ANZ - Australian Financial Review - 3 March 2020

"There is more security work to go round than there are resources. So I don't think the market is that crowded. It's important to remember that security is not something you buy and then it's done;...
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Google cloud boss looks to AI as it fights Amazon, Microsoft duopoly - Australian Financial Review - 2 March 2020

IBRS analyst Joe Sweeney has been tracking the three major Cloud vendors capabilities in AI and said Google is right to believe it has an edge over AWS and Microsoft when it comes to corpus (the...
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What should be in Australia’s next cyber security strategy? - Computer Weekly - 10 Feb 2020

Peter Sandilands, an advisor at analyst firm IBRS, called the discussion paper “a pre-judged survey” that is mostly looking for answers. He also questioned if the resulting recommendations would be...
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