Operations & Service Delivery

Conclusion: For many good reasons collaboration is seen as a means to improve productivity and kick-start innovation. Both productivity and innovation are how organisations can raise their effectiveness and competitive edge.

However, simply ‘doing collaboration’, as though it comes as a readymade solution, is a certainty to fail. Collaboration needs governance and management. The expectations have to be established and the tools to achieve an organisation’s goals need clarity and agreement. The biggest factor is people and culture, and how these respond and develop over time.

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Conclusion: IT groups often seek to manage mobile device fleets using practices honed for desktops and laptops. These groups will find themselves facing eight significant challenges. Furthermore, as the mobile management field evolves, desktops and laptops will take on some mobile device management practices, rather than mobile devices being shoehorned into traditional desktop management practices.

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Conclusion: In-house IT Service Management (ITSM) initiatives require considerable time and investment (up-to three years, up-to $1.5 million approximately). This has resulted in limited senior management continuous buy-in and reduced ITSM benefits realisation. Therefore, IT organisations wishing to implement ITSM should evaluate a public cloud alternative versus the cost and merits of establishing in-house service management capability.

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Conclusion: Windows XP will not stop working in April 2014 when Microsoft stops supporting this popular operating system. However, as time passes, this OS will become an increasing burden on organisations, due to third party support, security challenges, increasingly specialised skillsets, and perception. Windows XP will quickly become a legacy environment, with all the associated challenges. Consequently, CIOs should have a clear plan for any remaining Windows XP machines. The value of a clear plan is two-fold: firstly for common understanding within the IT department, but also for communicating to stakeholders.

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Over the last few years the talk about search engine optimisation has given way to hype about semantic search.

The challenge with semantics is always context. Any useful form of semantic search would have to consider the context of a given search request. At a minimum, the following context variables are relevant: industry, organisation, product line, scientific discipline, project, geography. When this context is known, a semantic search engine can realistically tackle the following use cases:

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Conclusion: Over the last five years the market of crisis management and emergency response systems has undergone a rapid evolution. Innovative solutions exploit the proliferation of smart mobile devices, the continuously growing number of available data feeds, the simplicity of the deployment models afforded by the Web, and powerful geographic information system functionality. Given the maturity of some of the available solutions, it makes sense for larger organisations in the public sector and for utility organisations to consider the deployment of a modern crisis management and incident response system.

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Conclusion: When faced with the need to upgrade the desktop, rather than viewing this as a refresh or modernisation project, which is an IT centric approach to technology issues, undertake a business centric Application Delivery roadmap that focuses on the end-user’s application experience and the business benefits.

An Application Delivery approach will reduce project risks by highlighting the linkages between the project and the business benefits, prioritising the delivery stages of the project to get value early in the project, and ensuring application delivery methods are aligned to the user’s needs, ensuring a high quality user experience.

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Conclusion: Difficulty in defining performance criteria for an enterprise architecture team typically points to a lack of clearly articulated business priorities, or to a lack of a meaningful baseline against which performance can be assessed. An enterprise architecture team needs to be given clear objectives that relate to the performance of the business, without being prescriptive in terms of the target IT system landscape.

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Conclusion: Driving value from Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS) requires more than just a technical evaluation. IT Organisations must get clear understanding of the features and benefits of the billing model and how these are aligned to, and can be used to drive, the business’ objectives (e.g. faster time to solution, rapid scale-up and down, infrastructure costs to usage and revenues).

Achieving this understanding will require IT organisations to elevate the evaluation of the IaaS billing model to the same level of consideration as other key non-functional requirements such as availability, recoverability, and security. Organisations that fail to do this may find themselves locked into costly, inflexible IaaS contracts that are not aligned to the business objective and which fail to deliver the full potential of the Cloud.

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