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Conclusion: Personas are a popular tool for organisations developing end-user computing strategies. Unfortunately, when used inappropriately, they can severely limit workplace innovation. However, the process of developing personas can be a very powerful tool for engaging with end users and uncovering opportunities to identify different work contexts within the organisation. Personas may also be used to simplify and communicate the business case for changes in how staff will leverage new end-user computing technologies in new ways.

Conclusion: Successful ICT life cycle service delivery from strategy development to system decommissioning relies on the person assigned the role picking up the work in progress and successfully completing the task before handing it to the next agreed role. It is analogous to the relay runner at an athletics carnival taking the baton from the previous runner and, on completion of the leg, handing it onto the next runner.

Unless the ICT service delivery model is designed well, critical activities might be missed or partially performed by different roles, resulting in duplication of effort, output overlap and, at worst, process failure. To overcome this problem the service delivery model must be thorough, and activities and the level of accountabilities clear so staff know what is required of them by activity.

Conclusion: Australian governments at all levels are in the process of rethinking, reimagining and redesigning systems, process and services to improve government service delivery to an ever more demanding community. A number of government jurisdictions have or are adopting a user-centric approach to the design and delivery of a new generation of government services.

User-centric approaches such as User Centred Design puts the user at the heart of design and implementation and focuses on building products and services that are usable and useful through an approach that is inclusive and iterative.

However, simply adopting a fashionable approach under the guise of best practice alone will not provide optimal benefits and often places undue focus on the process at the expense of critical cultural and capability elements. Agencies looking to design and deliver improved government services need to also anticipate and provide for critical success factors such as: what is the most appropriate user approach, what skills and personalities should design teams include and leverage, and what behaviours should user-centric change programs support, encourage and reward to facilitate a successful user-centric program?

Conclusion: Contact centres in Australia have been undergoing many strategic changes embracing digital transformation for well over a decade. So what awaits in 2017? As new technologies mature, it is time to seriously ramp up and explore the emerging trends and then embrace the next generation of technology enablers to better serve business aspirations.

Conclusion: Serverless programming is a new paradigm for developing and running Cloud-native solutions. It holds the promise of creating far more scalable solutions that ‘stitch together’ other Cloud services, making it the much-needed ‘programmatic underpinning’ for the Cloud. It is as significant a shift in software development as object orientation was from procedural programming in the 1980s.

However, serverless programming is immature, and its use cases not well understood. The timing for development teams to engage with serverless programming is largely dependent upon an organisation’s appetite for adopting bleeding-edge, Cloud-based services. The more services being adopted, the sooner the team should begin to learn this new programming paradigm. Even when used, care should be taken to limit the scope of deployment of serverless programs.

Conclusion: Abbreviated trialling of RPA platforms is shaping up as a relatively low risk, low cost approach to exploring the use of robotics to aid business process rather than lengthy technical evaluations.

However, business process re-engineering experience shows that just automating existing business processes without addressing inherent inefficiencies and adding a robotic overlay is a total waste of resources.

Basic RPA applications do not need IT coding and can reduce repetitive tasks and improve accuracy.

In more complex situations, use of RPA platforms and tools relies on leveraging IT systems integration in providing robotic aid to human intuitive decision-making.

Conclusion: As the nature of work is becoming less routine and linear, the most effective collaboration solutions are supporting the ways that teams and individuals want to work.

At the same time, customer service techniques are changing to appeal to individuals in the ways that they like to be treated.

Developments in business work flow and customer service are emerging in four broad generations of deployment:

  • Business process, work flow and customer service have morphed from document and transaction-centricity to
  • augmentation by social networking and mobility applications, followed by
  • increasing support from a conversational (Chat) model aided by interactive robotic speech, and
  • in future, even more personalised and intimate experiences delivered by Artificial Intelligence (AI) and Virtual Digital Assistants (VDA).

Conclusion: Organisations must proactively manage exactly which data is kept, secured, and backed up, as well as which data must be archived or permanently deleted. Data hoarding adds considerably to storage costs as well as potentially exposing organisations to risks especially if the data is inappropriate, unencrypted, or could put an organisation’s brand at risk.

Organisations need to have clear policies on exactly what sort of data is to be kept, especially when there are legal, regulatory or other specific reasons for keeping the data. Additionally, organisations need to be clear on what should not be kept.

Organisations cannot leave the management of this issue at simply expecting compliance to a policy. Business stakeholders must be closely involved in defining the business imperative for tracking data relevance and the value of data. Data specialists equipped with the appropriate tools will be required to specifically find data and manage it based on defined policies.

Conclusion: Communications vendors’ product shipping reports show that a disappointingly large number of Australian enterprises continue to re-invest in obsolete telephony solutions. In most organisations, this approach is a major waste of business opportunity and a misdirection of communications responsibilities given that popular and effective alternative unified communications and collaboration (UCC) solutions are so readily available.

UCC has become known as simply ‘collaboration’ and telephony needs to be seen as a supported part of the collaboration environment rather than as a first choice communications technology.

Do not re-invest in obsolete telephony solutions. Strong collaboration solutions abound.

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